Sign in to follow this  
awake

CHILDREN, GUNS, and the TRUTH

Recommended Posts

We all are products of information, misinformation and advertising. None of us can help being influenced by the barrage of communicated messages from god knows who. With that said i would like to offer you some facts about children and guns. We all know that 2nd amendment rights issues can be some of the most polarizing items in America today.2nd amendment folks and gun control folks have been like the Hatfield's an McCoy's most of my life.

The national coalition to ban handguns offered up that thousands of murders were committed by law abiding citizens who would still be law abiding if they had not owned a firearm. In 1976 the Washington DC city council used this information to ban guns city wide. Problem is that no facts were every used to back up such a finding. To this day the myth is still a myth, but because the national coalition says it is so then millions will believe in that unicorn.

In the 1990s gun control groups had figured out that the average US citizen had seen enought of his rights being eroded by activist like the gun control lobby. But they discovered that we will do most anything for the sake of our children. So for over 20 years we have been bombarded with fear based information from the gun control lobby on gun accidents involving kids.

So what is the truth? The truth is most of the public would think that thousands of our children die from hand gun accidents every year. We see images of school shootings. We have gun control groups shouting from mountain tops that the youth of our nation are killing themselves at every turn. The truth? Let me throw some facts at you. My numbers are backed up by the ATF , the CDC and other credible sources. In 1950 gun ownership was 0.4 guns per person in the USA. There were 1.1 accidental deaths of children (under age 14)

per 100,000 children. That number has declined to 0.1 per 100,000 children in 2004. The number of accidents have decreased even as the number of handguns has risen to one gun for every man women and child in the country. In the past 45 years we have seen a high of 598 deaths in 1967 to under 100 by the year 2000. Since 1950 the rate has fallen over 90%.

Despite what you see in the facts the gun control lobby continues to use their misinformation program and media friends to spread the rumors of death and mayhem. Handguns in the home of responsible Americans is a tool for safety and not an accident waiting to happen.

 

Be safe my friends. Learn the truth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your right Awake but its a up hill battle I may self never had a accident in the 40 years but my brother in law had friends who go shooting and it seems every time they go out something happens once someone got hit in the foot once in the leg hole in fender though roof of car I told him to stay far away for them but those are the people the media love

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes i agree wholeheartily the same can also be applied to "clean air" drought and other fear mongering organisations that perpetuate these myths- its how they get their money (i mean, OUR money)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Your right Awake but its a up hill battle I may self never had a accident in the 40 years but my brother in law had friends who go shooting and it seems every time they go out something happens once someone got hit in the foot once in the leg hole in fender though roof of car I told him to stay far away for them but those are the people the media love

 

There is never a case of a gun accidentally firing. A person must manipulate the firearm to cause it to fire. People must learn that you never ever touch that trigger unless you can live with destroying the object the barrel is pointed at. I once drove 2 hours to met some friends to shoot at their property. Really nice setup. 300yards nicely berm-ed and level as heck. A cousin of one friend pulls his 1911 out of his holster. It fired two feet away from him and with in six inches to the person on his right. Without even unpacking my guns i loaded back in the car and headed home. You cant fix stupid, but you should avoid it when you can. I dont advacate that every one should own a gun, only those who take the responsibility seriously. And when you carry you should hold yourself to a higher standard of conduct than the ordinary citizen. Guns are not toys. they are tools that can have deadly results. I pray that neither you nor i ever have to use a gun to protect ourselves. But we prepare for the worst in these times.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sad state of affairs, viral media getting into folks heads, with studies of how best to manipulate the masses to push lopsided agendas. Fear mongering and intentionally causing unrest to divide and conquer. Takes my mind to the early 1900's when government and big business stirred up racial tensions between black and white working class who'd been getting along peacefully for decades to break the backs of worker movements pushing for better pay and conditions.

 

I hate the fact that we as a society can't just scrap all the political and financial agendas and just live.

 

And weapon safety, any weapon for that matter, is everyone's responsibility in my opinion. Not saying I have the right to impose my will on anyone, but if I'm nearby and a guy is using a shotgun dangerously I do have the right, even the responsibility to inform him that he's a menace and how not to be.

 

As for the kids angle, i don't have any of my own, but I grew up around them as did almost everyone I knew. Safety was drilled into all of us, and all of the folks I know with kids are the same way, they take the time to teach. Not all that different than teaching a kid not to run with scissors, or not to stick their fingers in a light socket. Never had a single problem with negligent discharges amongst the children of anyone I've known or when I was a kid.

 

Ignorance and Fear is what the Great American Experiment has boiled down to, sad, sad state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hi all

awake i agree that children should be shooting at a young age.and the dangers ,mishapes . my sons are in there upper 30's,with no problems.i'm now working with my 9 year old grandson,since he was 5.i had a single shot 22 cut down on both barrel & stock.when he gets done shooting he takes out the bolt,this insures there is no bullet forgotten,accidential shooting.he's also been to DNR safety coureses on hunting,trapping, shooting gun,bow&arrow.i figure DNR can better teach safety than i can.

 

but talking good about (atf) and other alphabet agencies,i beg to differ.i believe crime would drop 70 % or more if they were all behind bars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hi all

awake i agree that children should be shooting at a young age.and the dangers ,mishapes . my sons are in there upper 30's,with no problems.i'm now working with my 9 year old grandson,since he was 5.i had a single shot 22 cut down on both barrel & stock.when he gets done shooting he takes out the bolt,this insures there is no bullet forgotten,accidential shooting.he's also been to DNR safety coureses on hunting,trapping, shooting gun,bow&arrow.i figure DNR can better teach safety than i can.

 

but talking good about (atf) and other alphabet agencies,i beg to differ.i believe crime would drop 70 % or more if they were all behind bars.

 

i applaud your efforts with your children and grandchildren. Look into NRA safety classes for kids as well. they do an excellent job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have taught my kids the proper way to use firearms since they could walk.I believe one of the biggest reasons mishaps happen with kids and guns is because of curious kids. parents hide their guns from their kids and that only makes the kids want to see it more. I have unloaded pistols and rifles and handed over to my kids and told them to just hold it and play with it and this was when they were young. I basically took the mystique out of it for them, they know what they can do and they know that anytime they want to hold one or shoot to just come ask and they know not to mess with them unless I'm around. Of course at 9 and 10 they both have their own personal rifles anyway. knowledge and teaching them the proper use and dangers of firearms is much better than hiding it from them and pretending it doesn't exist. kids are smart and will understand if a parent is just willing to teach them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i applaud your efforts with your children and grandchildren. Look into NRA safety classes for kids as well. they do an excellent job.

thanx awake,DNR,here they are nra trained.or i should say if they give gun safety classes. the classes my grandson is in,is both boy scout-dnr.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree completely. Once we as family members take the "mystery" out of guns, there is little or no desire to "play "with them. We were "mean parents" becuase we did then (and stil do now that they are adults) have loaded handguns at our disposal, never let our kids play with toy guns. If they wanted to shoot, they got to use real firearms. Took any ofmthen"forbidden mystery" out of real firearms for them, and if one of their friends tried to get their parents gund, our kids left or tattled immeidateoy on thier friends. Since that time, they now as adults all have their CCW permits, and our grand kids like to shoot the air rifles at our "range"we've set up here for them. Safety is always first and foremost, so, it becomes an enjoyable and safe activity. Recently, my almost six year old grandson wanted to see the gun safe. As I opened the door, which dwarfed him, he let a giggle out and said, Grandpa, when you die, I get all of this stuff!......but I will share with my brothers!" Not a bad sentiment at all, sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seems like centuries ago that my grand father took me shooting with a 22 rifle. my father had no interest in guns. which was a good thing considering his temperament. My grandfather was a German immigrant with no time for grandchildren that did not listen to the safety rules. he had lost a brother in a hunting accident and it left a permanent mindset on him. Grandfather spent hours with us showing not only safety and target shooting but proper gun maintenance. I heard him say in over and over, " if its worth having its worth keeping up". His lessons have stayed with me and been passed to the next generation. Maybe in a few years the next generation as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have taught my kids the proper way to use firearms since they could walk.

My mother, good Texican that she was, taught me to shoot when I was 7. My folks bought me a Benjamen Pellet gun (there weren't "air rifles" at the time), taught me it was a 'real' gun (no toy BB gun for me) and taught me how to shoot.

 

When I was 8 she taught me to shoot her .38. It was an antique (wish I still had it but my sisters got rid of it, grump). It was interesting. She left a chamber with a fired cartridge in it. Before each shot, she placed a penny on the flat-top over the cylinder. If the gun when bang and the penny fell, fine. If the gun didn't go bang and the penny fell I got a spanking! I got over flinching in a hurry! I got ALL the safety rules with my Benjamen and any broken rules were - well, I don't actually know because I was so scared of what they might do I never got careless! I got to use her .410 about that time as well. I got pretty good with that old break-action single. I guess I grew up with guns. Turned 20, joined the army and then got to play with the artillery. I do LOVE things that go BOOM!

 

I learned that there is no such thing as an AD (accidental discharge); there are only ND (negligent discharge); if it goes bang it is because somebody made it go bang!

 

I took my kids out to the woods with a .22 and a .410. Taught them gun safety and had each of them do some shooting at paper. Then I set up three small melons and had them shoot. It was great, melon everywhere. Then I told them to put the melons back together! That led to the discussion of a real gun will do that to anything it is pointed at. Shoot someone and you can't put them back together again. (OK, overkill perhaps but they learned).

 

Now all my grand kids shoot with their parents. All my kids are into being prepared, CHLs from their states, and in general taking care of their families. Kind of proud of the way they turned out.

Edited by Capt Bart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Benjamin Pellet gun! My dad brought me home one broken down in his airline suitcase. (Try doing that nowadays!) It was a .177 pump with a single screw to separate the stock from the barrel and trigger assembly. A lot of plastic army men fell to the accuracy of that gun!

 

It had a little round cover you had to open to drop in the .177 pellet. Later on I hunted squirrels with it. What memories! Where I lived on top of a hill in a development, there was a trail that went about a mile down to a good size pond. The pond was all weedy and only the center was open water. It sat in the crook of a good size hill and was all forested with no houses around. Spend many hours there hunting big frogs in the morning and squirrels in the afternoon. Peanut butter sandwich for lunch and a canteen of warm water.

 

Would love to do that again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see the bias on this issue from the local news and on a national level as well. Recently, there was a tragedy here in the Houston area where a child (10 years old I think) was waiting with his mother at a garage to get her car fixed and the boy found a gun under the counter and fatally shot himself.

 

Anyway, reading Letters to the Editor in the Chronicle (itself usually a conservative paper), I noticed that all of the writers were blaming the store owner and the mother (and I feel sad for kicking her when she is down) got off with a "poor little victim" pat on the back. Being a parent, I sympathize for the mother for her loss as well, but if she had controlled her child better or taught him not to point guns at his head, none of this would have happened. Instead, we get another incident where the gun control geeks can point and claim that Little Johnny would be alive if not for guns. On the other hand, if he had walked out in the street and been hit by a car, his mother would be castigated for failing to teach her boy that playing in traffic is a bad idea, but because he used a pistol, it is obviously the firearm at fault.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Texas Bill

it really breaks the heart when a child dies (needlessly is even worse). That's what the news folks jump on. Oh its the firearm merchants fault or even the manufactures fault. Never blame the parent for not educating the child or securing the firearm. No No never the parent.

Where is the logic? You bring children into this world. You cant protect them from every form of harm. But you should inform them of things like strange dogs might bite, look both ways before crossing the street, drugs kill, guns are to be respected and on and on.

Not one of us should ever out live their own children. I have seen that pain up close and personal. We were not supposed to live like that. I am sorry for the loss of this child and the guilt that will follow the mother the rest of her days. If you own a firearm act like a responsible parent. The only way to protect your kids is to educate them.

Edited by awake

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also grew up with guns and I still remember my dad admonishing me to "never trust a safety! The best safety on a gun (a Daisy bb/pellet gun at the time) is your finger."

 

One of the things I do now with my kids (both preschoolers) is open carry around the house with a handgun on my hip. It never fails to get a question out of my 4 year old and gives me a golden opportunity to talk with him about the proper use/handling of a firearm, why I carry a gun, what guns are for, etc. (The questions are endless when you're 4). My daughter is young enough that she really isn't interested... yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Not one of us should ever out live there children. I have seen that pain up close and personal. We were not supposed to live like that. I am sorry for the loss of this child and the guilt that will follow the mother the rest of her days. If you own a firearm act like a responsible parent. The only way to protect your kids is to educate them.

 

There it is, the agony of losing your child is a sort of living hell. The only way I can imagine it possibly being worse is if you knew that your neglect caused it. We tech our kids stop, drop, and roll. We teach them don't get into car with strangers. We teach them to look both was before crossing the road. Why do so few teach them not to touch gun, and later how to safely use them?

 

It's a tragedy, it really is, but it was preventable. Maybe she was mother of the year and it was the one in a million time she left her kid unattended for five minutes, but the question begs, where was she when her child picked up the gun? I have no children of my own any longer, but even I know that you don't leave kids unattended, especially in a public, or unfamiliar place.

 

It's a sad thing when the expectation is that your child's safety is the responsibility of everyone else. I see it all the time, four year old kids running around the grocery store unattended, seven year old kids riding skateboards downtown in the middle of the night by themselves.... The negligence and stupidity that's not only accepted in our society these days, but in many ways encouraged, is depressing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this