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barbie.dragon

Dog training: useful commands and marker training

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Hi everyone,

So there was an intriguing thread about whether or not people would bring their dogs and a handful of people said they wouldn't take their dog because they weren't trained (or along those lines). Nothing wrong with that. But I just have a suggestion that everyone that has a dog should definitely train their dog to know these basic commands and some "useful" commands in the urban setting.

 

1. Sit

2. Down

3. Stand

4. Recall

5. Name (attention not a recall)

6. Crawl (army crawl)

7. Speak

8. Quiet

9. Heel (learn to walk ahead, behind or next to the person on command)

10. Settle (laying down in a relaxed position, not the sphinx position.

11. Hold (holding the object presented)

12. Release (Release object in the mouth)

13. Paw (for both paws and back legs.)

14. "find" (finding anything that smells like the article given)

And this isn't a command but a dog should definitely trained to be able to carry its own pack (to hold their own food, BOB ect.)

 

Now the list seems pretty extensive to some and ridiculous to others but I believe this is essential to keeping a dog in a SHTF situation. Will this take time? Hell yeah, but so does everything else when it comes to prepping. I'm not saying this is easy peasy but it's not as difficult as it sounds. Through operant conditioning (clicker training or marker training) these behaviors are extremely easy to shape and put to command. Even though my dog training experience isn't extensive I have used marker training to train my dog and my friend's dogs to do pretty interesting and practical things in a reasonable amount of time.

Anyways this isn't a dog training forum but I still think everyone should give this a thought? Dogs are family to me and if my dog (if I still had her) was not trained I would pretty much take her with me just like how people would take their "untrained" and noisy 3 year old with them (please read that with good humor).

 

There are great online resources on marker training for dogs (look up karen pryor) if you are interested. Toodles!

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That's a pretty good list. I'm not a dog trainer, although I've worked with a few in the past and picked up some rough techniques, which since I've used to train my own dogs and friends dogs.

 

I've only trained my dog to; Sit, down, Relax (settle on your key word listing), come (recall on your list I believe), Go Ahead (permission to range out a ways), Post (bring him to a standing alert position at my side, normally what I start a bit of fetch with)

 

I've neglected heel since he naturally stay within about 5 meters of me off leash. Release has never been needed, but If I get around to training him Hold as I would like here in the near future it'll be required. I've yet to see any realistic/practical application of crawl aside from being cute though. Speak and quiet are commands I've never needed, he seemed to intuitively get that a few warning barks were plenty, and seems to bark at all the times I'd like him too (Someone walking by a window, unknown coming to the door, strange animal getting too close in the sticks.)

 

I guess I'm pretty lucky that he's been so easy to train, and can read me for appropriate actions.

 

A friend of mine once taught his dog a couple of entertaining and nerve wracking commands considering the dog in question was around the hundred pound mark. One got the mastiff huffing and grumbling in an unsettling way, and another got him barking and squatting like he was ready to pounce at the same time. He was never attack trained that I know of, normally not necessary with a good dog anyway, though opinions vary.

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This is just a suggestion and I use it when training any of my dogs. When teaching verbal commands add a different hand gesture with each command. If the situation arose that you couldn't verbally communicate you could still command the dog. As for recall my personal preferance is just to whistle. I usually start with a verbal recall followed by a whistle eventually you can drop the verbal and just whistle. Just my 2 cents worth

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This is just a suggestion and I use it when training any of my dogs. When teaching verbal commands add a different hand gesture with each command. If the situation arose that you couldn't verbally communicate you could still command the dog. As for recall my personal preferance is just to whistle. I usually start with a verbal recall followed by a whistle eventually you can drop the verbal and just whistle. Just my 2 cents worth

 

Great suggestion Silver. My mom trains Police K9's for the local PD and I have worked with her a lot growing up. I would also suggest a different language. Since she trains Shepherds and Malinois so it usually in Chek or dutch, but any language could be used.

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Yeah everyone had awesome suggestions. I just made a list of things a dog should know how to do on command whether it is verbal or visual. So like silverwolf said, you can replace any of those commands with another sound in his case a whistle for a recall.

@vicioustom: If you and your dog is at the right "wavelength" with each other then commands aren't needed to get your dog to do something. My doggie Naula just knew when to walk behind me, when to go forward, when to bark and not to bark. We were just in tune with each other all the time! =) I think crawl is a great command just in case you need the dog to crawl under a table ect (I live in California, earthquake state!!!), or of you have to jump over a fence and your dog can't, so you can dig a small hole underneath to get the dog to crawl underneath it ect. Also some tricks are great to have to raise morale right? :D

 

And remember everyone you don't have to use real words to pair it with a behavior. Dogs don't necessarily understand the words so you can teach a dog to sit when you say tree and stuff like that. I definitely recommend teacher verbal and then hand signals just because hand signals come naturally to dogs since that is their main way of communication (body language). Day by day training just really helps get everything done! =)

And conditioning a dog to use a pack is extremely important because the dog should be able to carry his or her own food and ideally water.

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my dogs are conditioned AIR CONDITIONED and they are good

at eating anything that comes in the yard and anything they find animal vegetable or mineral

everything in their bowl.

 

and they have a sense of humor they flip the mole or what ever critter in the air and chase it and

flip it again keeps them entertained for hours and then they like to fight over it or anything else for

that matter.

 

my big one was playing with a stick while i was working on a project a 2x4 about 4 foot long running

around and playing keep away while I was yelling at him to give it back.

 

seeing how I ain't leaving and they are not we will be together when it comes and if it comes.

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But I just have a suggestion that everyone that has a dog should definitely train their dog to know these basic commands and some "useful" commands in the urban setting.

 

1. Sit

2. Down

3. Stand

4. Recall

5. Name (attention not a recall)

6. Crawl (army crawl)

7. Speak

8. Quiet

9. Heel (learn to walk ahead, behind or next to the person on command)

10. Settle (laying down in a relaxed position, not the sphinx position.

11. Hold (holding the object presented)

12. Release (Release object in the mouth)

13. Paw (for both paws and back legs.)

14. "find" (finding anything that smells like the article given)

And this isn't a command but a dog should definitely trained to be able to carry its own pack (to hold their own food, BOB ect.)

Barbie,

excellent list but there is one I think should be here and isn't (maybe two). The first is "alert"; that is a command to be on guard and to 'sound off' if anything comes near. Several breeds of watch dogs do this very well with little urging. Others aren't so good at it. For example the job of the Lhasa Apso is to be noisy enough to wake the Mastiff who then gets to eat the intruder! The second possible, depending on the breed, is "guard". If the person being "guarded" moves, attack! I've seen military dogs trained that way - i do not recommend getting fidgety when under the 'care' of a trained guard dog.

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@capt bart: Yeah those two commands are extremely useful! Totally forgot about those... Must have slipped my mind hehe.

Ha, mastiffs eating intruders :) just made me smile. Strange sense of humor I guess.

But yeah, alert is a real great command to teach to a dog since their senses are so much sharper than ours! Thanks for the add to the list :D

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