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Mike Uher

Being weak is unacceptable...

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I know that if I had to bug out on foot, I'd be done for. I've had two spinal surgeries and have fusions w/rods and screws in two locations. Now I'm looking at what should be the last of the surgeries - fusion of some of the bones across the top of one foot. That should lay me up (foot never touching the ground) for 6 - 12 weeks and then in a walking boot for 3 - 6 months. After that, I should be some semblance of normal again. Meanwhile, I'm hoping that nothing hits the fan until I can handle it. And I'm so glad that I live in a time and place where these surgeries are possible.

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Getting fit is a great idea, but not overloading your pack is also very important. If you plan on walking a long distance, over several days, then anything beyond 25% of your body weight is going to wear you down much faster AND you risk injury from strained muscles or inflammation. Walking on the treadmill at the gym does NOT adequately prepare you for hiking a heavy pack. The extra weight of your load is distributed differently than your normal body weight, and therefore stresses muscles/joints differently.

 

I've known lots of guys who load up a huge pack and stagger off under the load - and by the end of the day (if they make it to the end of the day) they are moving slow and painfully. Foot injuries, back pain, pulled hamstrings, the works.

 

Get in shape, and if you plan on humping a heavy pack for a day or more, you need to work out with that loaded pack on a regular basis - before your life depends on it.

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Getting fit is a great idea, but not overloading your pack is also very important. If you plan on walking a long distance, over several days, then anything beyond 25% of your body weight is going to wear you down much faster AND you risk injury from strained muscles or inflammation. Walking on the treadmill at the gym does NOT adequately prepare you for hiking a heavy pack. The extra weight of your load is distributed differently than your normal body weight, and therefore stresses muscles/joints differently.

 

I've known lots of guys who load up a huge pack and stagger off under the load - and by the end of the day (if they make it to the end of the day) they are moving slow and painfully. Foot injuries, back pain, pulled hamstrings, the works.

 

Get in shape, and if you plan on humping a heavy pack for a day or more, you need to work out with that loaded pack on a regular basis - before your life depends on it.

 

x2. if you take the time you will usually see various items left behind on the first 2-3 miles of a hiking trail. Folks go into the woods with the kitchen sink strapped to their back and start shedding things pretty fast.

 

i would tell you to train as often as you can. BAD weather days are the best. Less people, harder training, puts you and the gear to the best possible test.

 

please if you haven't trained in a while, talk in out with your doctor first and start slow. No one runs a marathon on their first day. and see what you can do to trim down the weight on your back and around your waist. you cant carry 100 lbs very far. its better to make 2 trips with that weight. Oh and be kind to your joints. Blowing out a knee is game over.

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Survivalcyclist, dead on man. Last time we went to the state park, I did a pack run, only about 1.3 miles, but it was through trails and the like. My wife and i plan on doing a fair amount of camping and hiking with our two children, and I am working up to doing as much as possible with a pack for just that reason. Even when i was in the prime of my life, doing a twelve or twenty mile movement over roads was a back breaker. then again, i will only have the pack, and no armor (that is about sixty pounds off my frame right there) and a lighter pack (should I be fortunate enough to have to bug out in summer). If it is a winter bug out, then things are just going to suck butt, and I have come to accept that. Looking at buying a sled this summer for just that reason. But some advantages to that, no shortage of water (unless we have a repeat of this last winter...) and plenty of material for building a shelter (snow caves work wonders).

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So, I have been absent for a while (Mainly due to school, and writing a lot) but I stumbled across something that would fit here well. It goes along with getting used to your kit and equipment. I made myself some stand in weights for my magazines using long envelopes, #7 lead shot, and duct tape. i cut the envelopes in half, measured out 13.5 ounces of lead shot (that accounts for the weight of thirty rounds, and the follower and spring) and poured the shot into the half envelopes. I then wrapped them in tape to keep the shot from falling out. After they were done, I removed the follower and spring, and stuffed the weight into the magazine (I use Pmags, so keeping the base on is relatively easy as I have the cover that can be mounted to the bottom, but this should work well with any other mag as well). It took me about twenty minutes to do eight mags worth. now I have the ability to do workouts with my load out the correct weight, and I don't have to worry about having live ammunition on my person. Figured some on here might like this idea. I hope all is well with every one here.

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