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Mike Uher

Being weak is unacceptable...

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I had no idea where to put this, so here it is. I always see things about BOB's and what gun to carry, and "Should I have body armor". But no one ever talks about ways to get strong and stay strong after everything goes down the proverbial toilet. I bring this up, because a strong body, is a much more capable and healthy body. Think about it, do you think that the 500 pound person who can barely walk up the stairs to his own home is going to Bug out anywhere? (Zombieland has a great opening with regards to this). Especially when you add another 50 to 100 pounds of kit to their frames? i am in pretty good shape, 195, 32 waste. But i still have some trouble moving with 100+ pounds of crap on my body. So, how do we fix this little mechanical problem. Simple, diet and exercise.

 

But what can we do, that requires nothing? Because most of us have neither workout equipment, and when SHTF, we don't want to go outside to workout, and show off the fact that we can workout, because we have ample food to do so/ the plague is outside, not inside. There are many things you can do inside your home, away from prying eyes, that will get you fit, and capable of buggin out should you need to. I encourage others to add to this list, and offer their ideas. but i will start it, and give you mine.

 

Pack PT

Pack squats, Pack lunges, Pack presses, Pack burpees, Pack Paratroopers, walk around with pack on for a set time, Pack snatches, Pack curls, Pack pushups (wide, narrow, diamond, clapping).

 

Ammo can PT

Farmers walks around house, Ammo can presses, Ammo can curls, Ammo can lunges, One armed ammo can presses, Ammo can crunches, Ammo can snatches, Ammo can lat pulls, Ammo can pushups (require two ammo cans), timed ammo can presses, ammo can squats, tricep extensions.

 

LBE PT

LBE squats, LBE lunges, LBE burpees, LBE paratroopers, LBE pushups (wide, narrow, diamond, clapping), LBE crunches, LBE jumping jacks, dips, dive bombers, smurf jacks, side straddle hops, hindu pushups.

 

Rifle PT

Straight arm raises (front, left, right), Rifle crunches, thousands of presentation and mag change drills (they will burn you out if you do them long enough), rifle presses, one armed rifle presses, rifle curls, one armed rifle raises front, chicken winging, tricep extensions.

 

Calistenics

Pushups, crunches, pullups, burpees, body weight squats, body weight lunges, Paratroopers, smurf jacks, sidestraddle hops, jumping jacks, hindu pushups, dive bombers, spidermans, star jumpers, dips, army crawl, bridging, up downs, sungods, grippers, hand stand pushups.

 

As you can see, there are alot of things you can do (and this is not everything, just what i could come up with off the top of my head). I realize that some of us can't do some of these due to age, joint problems (i got those) and other things. But its a start. Getting used to working out when you have the means will help you when you need those muscles to survive, and carry your gear, or do the chores around your place (diggin is extremely hard on my back, and elbows). Let me know what you all think.

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hey mike I'm 6'2" 215 pounds 34 inch waist and in my mind in pretty good shape, I did a 5 mile hike with my pack this weekend, and holy crap man, I'm gunna start doing this stuff every night. I realized DO NOT take fitness for granted guys, this is a huge point Mike is making here, thanks for the thread Mike I needed a good program!

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No problem. i was thinking about it one day while walking all over campus with my bag (about thirty pounds with books). I figured that if i took that same bag, added my pertinent gear, then a smallish combat load (90-120 rounds for my rifle, binos, food, etc.) that I would top out at at least 90 pounds. made me think...

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Ya know, I got the opportunity to live the hard life in the high mountain desert for a little over a year. No running water, no electricity, no modern convenience aside from a truck to make long distance moves. It was amazing ho in the absence of TV and such my mind got sharper, and without all the soft living I got stronger and more vital without working out.

 

I think if you just do the basics to stay healthy right now then SHTF itself will reforge you, just my $.02. I try to do a bit more than just stay healthy, but I'm a little banged up and if I don't my body will seriously fall apart on me.

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good post Mike Love to hike and always take my BOB witch is about 22 LBS there is no ammo in it though every night 5 miles weekend 15 to 25 winter I don't get out that much go to gym walk tread mill (but) got hurt at work 1st week of DEC not returning till 15 feb so been laid up went on 1st hike since injure with pack only 5 miles and was puffing legs hurt and a tad sore so those of you who have heavy BOB training with the bag is something you need to think about

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Agree. People love buying and talking about gear, but not about getting in shape. All that stuff won't do you much good if you can't carry it. In addition to all of Mike's great suggestions, I recommend stretching. Keep up your flexibility and stretch out those muscles so you are less likely to pull anything.

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Good post.

 

Loading up my pack lead me to focus more on core training, especially getting my back....well, back.

 

You're better off with some freestanding whole-body exercise/chore (chopping wood, hauling rocks, etc) than machine exercise. The best workout I get is during my side job in the summer when we have to demo concrete. Get a nice big sledge and go swing at some concrete for half the day, then load it up. You'll feel that in the morning. If I could do that a couple times a week I'd be Thor.

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Guest survival101

Good Thread. Mike, I hear ya. But, there is an excuse being weak, just not an excuse for not trying to get better. Plenty of folks sick or disabled on the net, and even on these boards. But YES... encourage all you can to think on the reality of a heavy pack to haul, and physical work dawn to dusk. One thing I hear a lot: "I'm down in the back." If you have a back injury, you should talk to your Dr. about what you can realistically do, and how to get strong without causing worse injury. One thing often overlooked is the value of a long walk. For folks with back problems, it's often recommended. Hit the trails. The FLAT ones, to rebuild your core, strengthen your legs, improve your stamina, and more. Walk, walk, walk, if you are physically able. Just remember good posture, and don't overdo it. You can add hand weights, ankle weights, a weight vest, or even carry your pack, adding a little weight at a time. Good Luck.

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Good Thread. Mike, I hear ya. But, there is an excuse being weak, just not an excuse for not trying to get better. Plenty of folks sick or disabled on the net, and even on these boards. But YES... encourage all you can to think on the reality of a heavy pack to haul, and physical work dawn to dusk. One thing I hear a lot: "I'm down in the back." If you have a back injury, you should talk to your Dr. about what you can realistically do, and how to get strong without causing worse injury. One thing often overlooked is the value of a long walk. For folks with back problems, it's often recommended. Hit the trails. The FLAT ones, to rebuild your core, strengthen your legs, improve your stamina, and more. Walk, walk, walk, if you are physically able. Just remember good posture, and don't overdo it. You can add hand weights, ankle weights, a weight vest, or even carry your pack, adding a little weight at a time. Good Luck.

 

You're on the money with that, most of my old injuries only get debilitating when I slack off and get soft, I know a lot of other folks that are the same way, and it can make digging yourself out of the whole so much worse, but it's worth it.

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Great topic! I started my PT again last week. Working on getting my 1 mile time down to 6-7 minutes and then I'll probably start adding weight and more distance to build more endurance.

 

An added benefit is that you will also feel great from day to day.

 

Lastly, I think that running and 'typical' PT (sit ups, pushups, etc.) are not the only or best ways to get in shape.

 

I may sign up for Karate or Tae Kwon Do real soon so that I can train my body but also LEARN something.

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I started hiking the Appalachian Trail three years ago. I have carried 35 to 40 lbs in my pack for 30 to 35 miles per weekend. I try to get up to the trail every 2 to 3 months. It keeps me in good "hiking shape". I am 59 and can hike with most younger guys all day. It also gives me a chance to use all my camping gear in extreme conditions. This is not a walk in the park. It's up and down mountains all day long. The AT is a very rough trail. Rocks,roots any thing you can imagine.

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subguy,

 

I spent about two months on the AT before grad school. Hiking all day with that weight is one great way to get in shape. Keep it up. I need to get back out there and finish it up one of these days.

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I am glad everyone is taking this well. I know what you mean by body getting worse the longer you sit. If I don't do something, my back hates me. Even with a good routine, shoveling snow can put me in a world of hurt. I need to get out and start hiking, and doing things in this nasty, cold evil weather. nothing like getting cold to motivate you to be that much harder. YUT YUT!!!

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I am glad everyone is taking this well. I know what you mean by body getting worse the longer you sit. If I don't do something, my back hates me. Even with a good routine, shoveling snow can put me in a world of hurt. I need to get out and start hiking, and doing things in this nasty, cold evil weather. nothing like getting cold to motivate you to be that much harder. YUT YUT!!!

 

I hear ya Mike, I'm a MN boy myself, so I can relate...I have had some lower back problems off and on for years, and chiropractors are not cheap, anyway a few weeks ago I went to a yoga class (don't laugh) and I have not had a sore back yet. I have been very surprised how much I have improved in strength and general health, granted I have also spent some time on the treadmill and the elliptical, but I feel alot better after the yoga classes, and have had no more sleepness nights from back pain. And, I don't even have to go outside to get some exercise.

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I hear ya Mike, I'm a MN boy myself, so I can relate...I have had some lower back problems off and on for years, and chiropractors are not cheap, anyway a few weeks ago I went to a yoga class (don't laugh) and I have not had a sore back yet. I have been very surprised how much I have improved in strength and general health, granted I have also spent some time on the treadmill and the elliptical, but I feel alot better after the yoga classes, and have had no more sleepness nights from back pain. And, I don't even have to go outside to get some exercise.

 

Yoga is under rated. I should probably get back into the habit of 15 mins to a half hour a day. It builds amazing flexibility and core strength. Not sure, but it seemed to help keep my head clear too.

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nothing like puking to let you know you got a good workout.

 

I used to think that too, but stumbled upon some info that pointed to it being counter productive to push yourself to that point unnecessarily. Although there are certainly psychological benefits that come with getting used to being that uncomfortable.

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So, today we went to the local state park, and I walked around with my bag, with my family along the trails, and through the woods. i had forgotten just how many muscles you don't realize you have are needed to do that kind of off roading. However, it was good. We moved at a rather slow pace (the kind i suspect we would move at if we were forced to leave) and the forty pound bag really didn't hamper me at all, even carrying my fifteen pound daughter. i plan on making it a regular thing now, and look forward to doing some ruck runs out there, and some good old fashioned hiking. My wife plans on doing the same, though I think that her learning curve is going to be much steeper than mine. But still, good for all involved.

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Guest survival101

Mike, been doing some light yard work, carrying some light (under 40 pound) loads for short distance, and feel a lot better than I did this winter. Back is still bad, but I can feel those muscles starting to strengthen. Glad you are keeping us going on this.

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