Sign in to follow this  
shadowplyr

detailed map usage

Recommended Posts

While i know how to fully read a map, topographical map, use a compass, or a watch to tell direction, i would love to see a detailed article on how to use maps. More so I would like to see an explanation of how to tell how far you have traveled without GPS so you can tell where you are on a map easier. this seems to be my big issue, when i am using a map in the woods i find that it is hard for me to keep track of my where abouts and have not figured out how to keep track of myself on a map.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you done a "pace count"? Use a measuring wheel and measure 100 meters (the system used for military topo maps) and pace count yourself. Remember NOT to take exaggerated steps and I usually told my troops to actually take a "small" natural step, as this is usually what is taken in the woods. Then you can at least keep track of your paces for an estimated distance.... it can be very accurate if you monitor steps and use pace counters of some kind to keep track of them. The only other way is triangulating your position and then you can basically figure out the distance covered on the map.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you done a "pace count"? Use a measuring wheel and measure 100 meters (the system used for military topo maps) and pace count yourself. Remember NOT to take exaggerated steps and I usually told my troops to actually take a "small" natural step, as this is usually what is taken in the woods. Then you can at least keep track of your paces for an estimated distance.... it can be very accurate if you monitor steps and use pace counters of some kind to keep track of them. The only other way is triangulating your position and then you can basically figure out the distance covered on the map.

 

Try to get a pace count of both your relaxed pace and hurried pace, and see if Tinderwolf can make you a pace counter out of paracord. Just a little extra added to what Regulator said.

Edited by Vicioustom

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Vis, I think we were posting at same time...lol.

 

Shadow, give me a sec and I'll find a link for the Land Navigation manual in digital form for you. You can download it (free) and it'll help give you a more detailed understanding of what we are trying to say in our "shorthand".

 

http://www.enlisted.info/field-manuals/fm-21-26-map-reading-and-land-navigation.shtml

 

http://www.enlisted.info/field-manuals/

The first link is Land Nav manual, second link is for all unclassified US Army manuals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Lol, yeah, I'll back out, we'll pretty much being saying the same stuff.

 

I don't think we can add much more without specific questions. Besides, even covering the same thing, you added a point , relaxed vs harried pace, that I missed. I just got tired of having to show the "younguns" how taking a long stride on the track/road was different than the pace they used to walk in the woods. Most were "city kids" and they really adjusted their step when they entered the brush. The other issue is most people look down when they enter the woods, watching for trip hazards, and lose their azimuth of march.

The funny one was watching one walk into a tree because he refused to take his eyes off the compass. I shoot an azimuth to a landmark (large tree, boulder, etc) and then walk to it while counting and WATCHING where I am going.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shadow, these are just the basics of keeping distance travelled as a known entity. In some situations, you must deteor from your intended path. When doing so, keep track of your paces and try and walk straight lines and count your paces. This is for skirting a pond/lake, clearing (if trying to remain hidden), or other obstacles. After you pace the "side" distance, resume general direction of travel and go back to your original pace count until obstacle is cleared, then walk a back azimuth to your original line of march (by counting the side line march, you know how far to backtrace to get on original path) and then you can resume your original path and not lose track of your distance. It sounds more difficult than it is, just keeping the different pace counts is "confusing" but you will be able to maintain your relative position withing a few feet pretty easily after some practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't think we can add much more without specific questions. Besides, even covering the same thing, you added a point , relaxed vs harried pace, that I missed. I just got tired of having to show the "younguns" how taking a long stride on the track/road was different than the pace they used to walk in the woods. Most were "city kids" and they really adjusted their step when they entered the brush. The other issue is most people look down when they enter the woods, watching for trip hazards, and lose their azimuth of march.

The funny one was watching one walk into a tree because he refused to take his eyes off the compass. I shoot an azimuth to a landmark (large tree, boulder, etc) and then walk to it while counting and WATCHING where I am going.

 

Man, I feel your pain, watched a kid step in a badger hole and whack his head on a stump a couple years ago for the same reasons. What can you do though, we buy them books, send them to school, and they eat the pages :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Man, I feel your pain, watched a kid step in a badger hole and whack his head on a stump a couple years ago for the same reasons. What can you do though, we buy them books, send them to school, and they eat the pages :rolleyes:

 

LMAO... I just wish I had a camcorder.... great for a teaching aide, but better for my amusement...lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Vis, I think we were posting at same time...lol.

 

Shadow, give me a sec and I'll find a link for the Land Navigation manual in digital form for you. You can download it (free) and it'll help give you a more detailed understanding of what we are trying to say in our "shorthand".

 

http://www.enlisted.info/field-manuals/fm-21-26-map-reading-and-land-navigation.shtml

 

http://www.enlisted.info/field-manuals/

The first link is Land Nav manual, second link is for all unclassified US Army manuals.

 

your amazing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
any good overnight hiking/camping areas around either place?

 

I'm sure there are in ILL but I do not know them. Indiana has the Hoosier national forest that is open to the public and I believe they have a website. I know alot of people who go there and camp during squirrel season and hunt while they camp. I plan on taking the boys down there this fall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Have you done a "pace count"? Use a measuring wheel and measure 100 meters (the system used for military topo maps) and pace count yourself. Remember NOT to take exaggerated steps and I usually told my troops to actually take a "small" natural step, as this is usually what is taken in the woods. Then you can at least keep track of your paces for an estimated distance.... it can be very accurate if you monitor steps and use pace counters of some kind to keep track of them. The only other way is triangulating your position and then you can basically figure out the distance covered on the map.

 

ranger beads. never hike without them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pace_count_beads#Description_of_ranger_beads

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off the topic if I may,

Just picked up the cammenga official us military tritium lensatic compass, and have to say love the feel of it. Iam fairly new in map and compass orienteering, have a base plate compass, never really worked with a lensatic one, but i love the feel of this cammenga one. Any take on, based on your experience, what compass type should I get familiar with more, or just get familiar with both types?

As Iam getting familiar with maps and land navigation, I could use your advise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PSLL, I carry the Cammenga tritium myself. I would suggest getting used to both styles if by "base plate" you are referring to the type usually sold as a "Boy Scout Orienteering" compass. I prefer a card style instead of a needle. The Cammenga will work as a map orienteering compass as well. The military style will allow you to practice using the Land Navigation Field Manual of the US Military, as this is what they base their training on. I would even practice using a "button" compass, the type that they sell for attaching to your watchband and such. They are definitely not going to get you within a meter of your target waypoint, but will give you general direction (usually) and allow you to use landmark/topo navigation to find your way a little better.

One thing to remember about a tritium compass is that tritium is radioactive and if broken, can cause alarms to go off. It's not much but when in a "target" enviroment on heightened alert status (NYC, DC, etc); it can draw unwanted attention to you. I was told tritium sights (night sights) can cause same situation but it's only hearsay and I'm not knowledgeable in this area to say yes or no.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • Hey I am new here i go by Bishop but not new to  the survival world what I call every day Life hoping to add to the site I am interested in slingshots bows Kylie stick bolas slings atlatls blow guns camping fishing hunting traping and playing sports but not watching .
    • I am new here name is Bishop I make hunt and shoot slingshots I have taken everything from bees to deer  with a sling shot I shoot flat bands mostly if you need any advice just ask 
    • Great thread. My son is attending a higher-end university in VT. His tuition is over $60k a year - can you imagine getting out of school with almost  a quarter million dollars' debt and just starting at the bottom of the barrel? I started working construction when I was 20, learned an incredible amount, worked my ass off, and now I have a comfortable job with zero college debt.   
    • Yep, lay low, gather intel, keep your signature as small as possible, to the leaving and the dead. Keep an eye out for masses of people - hopefully there's a network of some kind to give you a heads up a few hours before they descend on you, so you can get a start on a secondary BOL. Run, don't stand and fight.