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Rod

A place to go: BOL

BOL: Do you.....  

33 members have voted

  1. 1. BOL: Do you.....

    • Live in your BOL?
    • Plan on acquiring and living in your BOL?
    • Plan on acquiring your BOL?
    • Have a place to go as your BOL?
    • Have not yet selected a BOL?


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I think for any longer term event it will be a necessary part of your plans to, at minimum, have a BOL. I am curious how this group has addressed this issue at this stage of your planning. If you would, answer the poll and chip in a few words of your thoughts on a BOL. I know that your age and resources will largely determine where you are on a BOL but I thought it might help other people to understand what could be the most expensive part of prepardness.

 

For me, I bought five acres on top of a mountain way back in 1979. My wife and I built our own home and raised two boys there. The house was specifically designed by myself to meet the challenges of a possible need to be self sufficient. Thankfully, we have only ever had to endure a few days of no electricity. But it has been a source of reassurance for a large part of my life.

 

How does that need for reassurance drive your decisions?

Edited by Rod

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Rod, this has been a tough one for me. At 55, with a tricky knee, I'd prefer staying home. Since I can't guard the castle all by my lonesome, if under attack, I have a outdoor place, in nearby woods....just did some hiking last night and found that place and would suit me just fine. It is off a trail, so I may not be alone there. That's a potential problem.

 

I do own a 2nd home, but it's 11 hours away, so that would not work unless I have certain knowledge that would allow me to get a head start. Still, there would be no guarantee that it would be any better (too many unknowns with this scenario).

 

I have a neighbor that has a small farm in BFE, 45 mins away from my current home, that would be ideal. But, prepping isn't an interest of his. I've even offered to help him start a garden. He'd rather ride his ATVs.

 

I wish I'd had the foresight that you had for your family. That mountain top sounds nice. I'm just not going to buy a 3rd piece of property. LOL

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Rod, After several years of wandering around the lower 48 looking for a BOL or what I call a “retreat site” when I'm in mixed company (i.e. preppers and non-preppers), I finally settled on a place a couple years ago. To put structure in my search I had developed a set of criteria which helped me look for a site where my family and I would have the greatest chance of survival if the predicted (expected?) OMG, SHTF, or TEOTWAWKI really did happen.

 

An abbreviated list of my criteria was:

(1) the retreat could be no more than 1 tank of gas away from where I and my family lived and worked;

(2) the retreat site must be further than 9 miles from an Interstate or major highway;

(3) the retreat site could not be close to a large city or large town;

(4) the site could not be seen from the nearest road or neighbors;

(5) assuming that a person can walk at a 3mph pace, then the retreat had to be at least 3 hours walking (9 miles) from an Interstate/major highway, 70 hours walking (210 miles) from a large city or town, and 8 hours walking (24 miles) from the nearest small town that has a grocery store, hardware store and hospital/clinic;

(6) at least an acre of the site had to be flat but there also had to be lots of trees; and

(7) there had to be a good source of water on the site – either a well or fast moving water.

 

As I said earlier this list is just the abbreviated short list. The original list got modified a lot of times by the family and the full list is way too long for this reply.

 

Once I found and acquired the site getting it ready for habitation was nearly a full time job. I started by getting my 36’ RV to the site. I used it as a basecamp while I made improvements to the retreat's perimeter and outbuildings. Getting the RV up there --- well, that’s another story.

 

Since acquiring the site my family has used it a lot. It's a great place to go and unwind. Each time we go out there we try to make small improvements. Currently working on better sleeping quarters and cooking facilities.

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Well Capt Rob, you sure beat me on criteria thoroughness! I took an airplane up and when I found a spot that looked good, I looked up who owned it and made an offer. :D

 

Love to hear your story on getting up a 36' RV to the site! It is always fun to laugh about experiences once their over and at least six months in the past. After about a year I find I can improve on the telling of the story! B)

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Rod: To make a long story short I discovered that logging/fire roads were not designed to handle 36’ RVs. They are way too narrow, far from being level and have humps in them which can hang-up a long, low vehicle.

 

A little over two years ago I had acquired a nice piece of Kentucky property and drove my 2000 Pace Arrow that was way overstuffed with my prepper necessities that I had been collecting for years. My plans were to get the RV to the retreat site and live in it while making improvements to the land. The final leg of the journey was traversing an old logging road for about 3 miles. I had scouted out the road prior to purchasing the land and was convinced that I could get the RV to the final site.

 

Everything was going as per the plan until Murphy reared his head at about 2 miles down the logging road. I had been carefully white-knuckle navigating the road and felt I was on the final stretch and anxious for that first cold adult beverage when I suddenly found myself in an RV trap… a subtle hump in the road purposely designed by Mother Nature to wedge itself under the RV basement at about mid-point. The rear wheels were about an inch removed from the dirt surface (i.e. no traction) and the front wheels were in a similar situation. Because the road was so narrow the driver side door was up against the steep hill so it couldn't be opened. The main door behind the passenger seat could be opened but the first step would have given a bungee jumper second thoughts. I couldn’t get out but at least I had a fridge full of cold ones.

 

I had to admit to defeat and call the wife on the two-way. She had driven point in the F-150 and was waiting for me at the retreat site. After subjecting me to an ear full of “I told you that would happen” she drove the truck back to RV, hooked up the winch, and carefully pulled me over the dirt hump. The remaining mile was uneventful and very quiet.

 

Now a-days while sitting around the campsite with members of my extended family enjoying life the wife loves telling this story. Of course she throws in tid-bits like me running fore and aft in the RV trying to rock it off the hump and the bit about me rappelling out the side of the RV and then having to climb back in when I discovered that the transmission needed to be in neutral so the truck winch could be effective.

 

Life is good.

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Rob: Fellow Kentuckian here. Are you on the east side or the west side of the state? There are lots of great potential BOL's in KY. I have a friend that would have a great one, near Crittenden toward the northern part, but he "doesn't get it". I have some relatives to the SE part but I usually stay out of there because of all the painkiller / meth killings going on down there

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So let me get this straight Capt Rob. Your wife had to to haul your a$$ out of trouble with her pick up truck! I can see how she gets mileage out of that! :D :D :D

 

Great story!

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MikeE: The BOL is in Eastern KY. The RV has been set up there for over two years now and my family has been on site many times. As far as I can tell we're the only ones using the logging road, which appears as bad today as it did when I first trekked in there with the beast (the RV not the wife). Our BIL (our residence) is in Central KY.

 

Rod: The wife (over 40 years now) has saved my bacon more than once.

 

rayz: You know you're in for an enjoyable evening when you hear the grandkids say "Tell us about the time . . ." It seems like the "sea-stories" get better and better with each telling.

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I really like the criteria you guys have. My Bol is a peice of property I inherited. It's rural but far from perfect. I'm just trying to make the best of it. Security is a big problem. But fresh water sorce and land for sustainable resources are great.

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Hello everyone, I am hoping you can help with this. My wife and I watched the "Survivorman Off The Grid" video. Wife says she would be ok living in the country like that. (whoo hoo me!!)

 

The problem is I have no idea how to buy land.

 

A discussion area on how much land to buy, where to buy, HOW to buy BOland would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks from Terrance450 in Canada!

 

ADDED BY CAPT BART

Terrance450 - I've moved your post and threads here as we discussed on private mail. I think this is a more appropriate post location.

Thank you, Capt Bart

Edited by Capt Bart
Added information for moved post.

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http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/showthread.php?1110-A-place-to-go-BOL

 

Here is a thread already started that has many ideas and a very good set of criteria to look at and then you can adjust for personal needs. Also, look at the Country Living threads and the farming threads. I'm not sure exactly how detailed you are looking for, but these can be a great starting point.

Are you planning on a self sustained homestead or just looking for a retreat? Planning on livestock? a garden? how many people? Do not answer anything that can compromise OpSec, but these are questions that will need answers to at least yourself to be able to even begin finding property to meet your needs.

Welcome to the site.

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one thing get a title company to verify the title this puts them on the hook if the title is not

clear it cost a bit of money but that can be included in the contract as to who pays and how much

It is called a title search

 

I looked at some land in Idaho it was vertical literally no part was flat and no access to water nor a road

there is a lot of land you cannot build on because its a wetland or historical site you need to know

what you can and cannot do some places require a certain size to hunt or shoot on your property.

some land is land locked meaning you are surrounded by others or the state and unless you get an

easement for a road you will be trespassing.

boundaries and meets should be verified and found before you buy or build they are iron rods

at the corners of your property, done by the original surveyor and a new survey may be necessary.

this can be agreed to in the contract also.

 

building codes are county by county and some are state wide and it depends on your title

my title states unrestricted I can have a business or home or both raise animals or not.

no water district {cheap water} no housing association fees or telling me what and how and what color

of my structure or what it is built from.

 

if a structure was on the property sometimes it is a good thing some places the home owner to

{remodel} as long as one wall from the old home remains after a while it can be remodeled LOL

need to look up water company electric bills and requirements like a water meter and temp pole

to start construction. they do not make things easy and sometimes building permits are required

or you can build a "storage building" with a mobile home box and pole for {on site power}

then later construct a home there are proper ways around building codes and are legal

you would be well served to speak to your neighbors one area I know of has recently been

found to have toxic elements in the soils so the surrounding area might be effected

you may fine interesting elements of local living you may love it or hate it but it is best to know.

 

if your going to live off the grid build smart as most insurance companies will not cover you if

your not connected to the grid building from local stone is best but terrain is important

however you decide make it fire resistant as possible there is a concrete block coating with fibers

looks like stucco but bonds the blocks together better than mortar and a metal roof and fire resistant

blown in insulation. or shipping containers a lot to think over.

 

but i would never buy land I have never seen or found out the neighbors some ares look so peacfull

and every time the owners leave they are burglarized.

you need to know if water dries up or wells go dry how much bad weather etc...

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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My first plan would be to bug-in at our ranch. We would be ok if left alone, but we are 30 minutes from a city of around 125,000 people and 1.5-2hrs from a city of around 500,000. That is scary to me especially since lines of drift would likely go west down the interstate highway a couple miles from home. I have several locations in mind, but none prepared. We have a pasture 20 miles from home with a good spring and poor access with some old stone buildings but nothing repaired. I'd like to improve it but another relative stands to inherit that place while my branch of the family that manages and works the ranch gets the headquarters and rest of the land. Anyway, there is a decent size river and some tributary streams that are public about 9 miles from home that I know very well from catfishing them. If worst comes to worst, I have a place and freind in mind several states from here.

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Wow! What a great post Capt Rob. I am 36 and I'm hoping in the next couple of years to be able to acquire a very similar property to your criteria. I've found a nice location geographically here where I live, now looking for the right property. I've found that land in a good BOL is actually more affordable.

 

Thanks again!

 

Matador.

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Rod, After several years of wandering around the lower 48 looking for a BOL or what I call a “retreat site” when I'm in mixed company (i.e. preppers and non-preppers), I finally settled on a place a couple years ago. To put structure in my search I had developed a set of criteria which helped me look for a site where my family and I would have the greatest chance of survival if the predicted (expected?) OMG, SHTF, or TEOTWAWKI really did happen.

 

An abbreviated list of my criteria was:

(1) the retreat could be no more than 1 tank of gas away from where I and my family lived and worked;

(2) the retreat site must be further than 9 miles from an Interstate or major highway;

(3) the retreat site could not be close to a large city or large town;

(4) the site could not be seen from the nearest road or neighbors;

(5) assuming that a person can walk at a 3mph pace, then the retreat had to be at least 3 hours walking (9 miles) from an Interstate/major highway, 70 hours walking (210 miles) from a large city or town, and 8 hours walking (24 miles) from the nearest small town that has a grocery store, hardware store and hospital/clinic;

(6) at least an acre of the site had to be flat but there also had to be lots of trees; and

(7) there had to be a good source of water on the site – either a well or fast moving water.

 

As I said earlier this list is just the abbreviated short list. The original list got modified a lot of times by the family and the full list is way too long for this reply.

 

Once I found and acquired the site getting it ready for habitation was nearly a full time job. I started by getting my 36’ RV to the site. I used it as a basecamp while I made improvements to the retreat's perimeter and outbuildings. Getting the RV up there --- well, that’s another story.

 

Since acquiring the site my family has used it a lot. It's a great place to go and unwind. Each time we go out there we try to make small improvements. Currently working on better sleeping quarters and cooking facilities.

 

Sir, I must admit I am quite jealous of you at the moment. If I had the financial means, I would buy myself a few acres up in the mountains too.

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