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Sleeping Bags

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So I was at the fire station the other night when one of our new guys came in and was complaining about being broke. He's in the Army. I asked how broke. He said my truck just got repoed broke. I was online looking at the military sleeping bag systems that we've been talking about here. He said, " you know that I'm in the Army right?" I said, "yes". he said, "I've got 3 of those sleep systems and I'm broke." I said, "go get your nicest one and let me look at it." He went and brought one back with the stuff sack and everything. It was in amazing condition. I asked him how much he wanted for it. He said, "make an offer, but I know what they're worth so don't lowball me too much." I had $80.50 in my wallet. I showed it to him. He took the money and left. lol. So I'm now the proud owner of a sleep system from the U.S. Army. lol. And at a price that I can re-sale it and make a little dough if I don't like it. :)

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Here is a little tip for cold sleepers. You know those chemical hand warmer packages? Open one up and place it beween your thighs when you go to sleep. Your major arteries pass through that area on their way to and from the heart. It is amazing how much warmer you feel with just the small amount of heat they provide. I use that technique when I am on a really cold campout. I have found it to work great.

 

A couple of other tips for cold weather sleeping. Always, and I mean always, change into fresh dry underwear before going to bed. Always wear something on your head. Eat a chocolate bar just before turning in. Don't sleep with you head inside the sleeping bag. Moisture build up is brutal. Insulate yourself from the ground. Keep your next day's clothes in the bottom of your bag where they will be warm the next morning. Be very careful to keep your footwear inside the vestible of your tent with a couple of layers of old towel or rag laying over them. Bury your water bottles in your pack along with anything else that can freeze.

 

All hard learned lessons from years of camping in the cold.

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Here is a little tip for cold sleepers. You know those chemical hand warmer packages? Open one up and place it beween your thighs when you go to sleep. Your major arteries pass through that area on their way to and from the heart. It is amazing how much warmer you feel with just the small amount of heat they provide. I use that technique when I am on a really cold campout. I have found it to work great.

 

A couple of other tips for cold weather sleeping. Always, and I mean always, change into fresh dry underwear before going to bed. Always wear something on your head. Eat a chocolate bar just before turning in. Don't sleep with you head inside the sleeping bag. Moisture build up is brutal. Insulate yourself from the ground. Keep your next day's clothes in the bottom of your bag where they will be warm the next morning. Be very careful to keep your footwear inside the vestible of your tent with a couple of layers of old towel or rag laying over them. Bury your water bottles in your pack along with anything else that can freeze.

 

All hard learned lessons from years of camping in the cold.

 

All excellent information Rod!!!!!!!!

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Here is a little tip for cold sleepers. You know those chemical hand warmer packages? Open one up and place it beween your thighs when you go to sleep. Your major arteries pass through that area on their way to and from the heart. It is amazing how much warmer you feel with just the small amount of heat they provide. I use that technique when I am on a really cold campout. I have found it to work great.

 

A couple of other tips for cold weather sleeping. Always, and I mean always, change into fresh dry underwear before going to bed. Always wear something on your head. Eat a chocolate bar just before turning in. Don't sleep with you head inside the sleeping bag. Moisture build up is brutal. Insulate yourself from the ground. Keep your next day's clothes in the bottom of your bag where they will be warm the next morning. Be very careful to keep your footwear inside the vestible of your tent with a couple of layers of old towel or rag laying over them. Bury your water bottles in your pack along with anything else that can freeze.

 

All hard learned lessons from years of camping in the cold.

 

great info i agree.

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Just to add some things to consider. Empty your bladder before you retire. It takes extra energy to keep the fluid at body temp. Plus if you can forgo the mid night bathroom break, you save heat. You can turn your sleeping bag compression sack inside out, place your boots inside and put the boots in the bottom of your bag. Warm boots in the morning. :) If you get cold you can do sit ups in the bag to generate heat. Use your back pack for extra insulation under your pad. Place leaves and pine needles under the place you pitch your tent. Use wind breaks when possible.

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I have only ever used 2 different sleeping bags, a light weight fleece bag and a "zero degree" sleeping bag (not a mummy bag). I preferred the fleece one in pretty much all conditions except when the temp dropped down near freezing. On a side note I was always told that mummy bags are great at low temps but it would soak up water like a sponge, for that reason i kinda steered clear of em.

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I used to have a home made bed roll

 

it was 2 large wool blankets and an oiled 10 to 14 ounce canvas tarp coated and let dry with linseed oil

both sides a few coats

 

until it is dry it can catch fire if folded or wadded up.

so hang it up until dry and every year re treat some used boiled linseed and some used unrefined

 

you can do this yourself and depending on your size and weight the weight of canvas and place eyelets

where they work for you these can be used for a sail for a raft, hammock, ground cover, hammock,

tarp, shooting blanket {keeps dust from flying obscures position of shot} wind break etc.

 

a shoe shop or a saddle shop can sew the edges once you have sized it to suit you

I like them because they last better than these new tarps and the scent although not

a perfume it is not bad but bugs do not like it.

the wool blankets I made a slit to use them like a Mexican serape had the edges sewed so they

would not fray.

 

3M scotch guard is great for shirts and back side of pants and legs below knees to keep cuffs

from getting wet do not treat the whole garment because then it acts like a rain suit and traps heat

and does not allow breathing and if you get soaked it takes longer to dry so on a shirt under the arms

a strip 4 to 6 inches wide to the waist and elbows I just treat the upper chest shoulders and back.

these area when wet draw heat from the body and wet cuffs and legs drip down your legs into your

socks and your feet get wet and your back thighs and butt gets wet when you set so that's why I

treat these areas.

 

many bags rate high but when it gets soaking wet well that's where the rubber meets the road

isn't it.....

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Snake,

looks like an inadvertent double post. Would you care to delete one, or I can if you choose. No harm if we don't, just a little neater that way.

Thanks.

 

noticed it was double posted when I did it, and I thought I deleted one apparently NOT

 

I think I got it this time..

 

thanks

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