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Guest zen811

Medical Kit Prep

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Guest zen811

Dr Bones/Nurse Amy and Joe Knight,

 

Just wondering what your thoughts were on what a good basic medical kit should have for:

 

1) Everyday Carry (What would be small enough to fit in a small day bag or purse that would contain enough essentials to get by until a person could get to their BOB or main medical kit)

2) Bug Out Bag (Same deal except having a bit more room to put a few more items inside)

3) Basecamp/Bug In Kit (The ideal mostly complete kit that would cover most life threatening emergencies and minor situations that if curtailed early can prevent medical emergencies.)

 

Thanks for your time and thoughts.

 

ZEN

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Also, do you have any suggestions on how to add/ what to add to those little first aid kits that you can buy? All the one's that I've seen are essentially 5 band aids, a ibuprofen and a disinfecting wipe.

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Hi Delta7 and Zen811,

 

Here is my list for BOB: tx=treatment

 

antiseptics-at least 2 different

oral antibiotics, may include garlic oil, honey,cayenne,thyme oil,peppermint oil and eucalyptus oil

antibiotic ointment

multi size bandages and ace bandages

gauze/dressings include telfa pads and xeroform petroleum dressings (non stick)

ABD pads

tapes

quality bandage scissor/trauma shear

4 pair or more nitrile gloves

masks, surgical(for sick people) and N-95(for healthy people)

dermabond/needle holder and sutures

tweezers

several large and small size safety pins

magnifying glass

pen light

tongue depressor(s)

clotting powders/dressings

quality tourniquet

olaes modular bandage

Q-tips

cravet triangle bandage

snake bit kit

rubber bag (hot water bottle)

 

dental kit /and extra clove oil(numbs pain, and good for minor burns when mixed with geranium oil)

 

claritin (non-drowsy antihistamine)- hay fever/allergies

 

benadryl ( drowsy antihistamine)-allergic reactions to stings/medication/food/contact with irritants/this is the other ingerdient in tylenol PM! It really puts you to sleep at 50mg dose, but this is a better dose for serious allergic reactions!

 

epi-pen, if needed for serious allergic reactions

 

sudafed-decongestant,

 

eucalyptus essential oil- also a decongestant and good for coughs/ also a good insect repellent

 

pain relievers- asprin/tylenol/ibuprofen

 

immodium-for diarrhea tx

 

hydrocortisone cream-anti-inflammatory

 

helichrysum essential oil- also anti-inflammatory and additionally an analgesic

 

Lip balm-I love carmex brand

 

zinc oxide-rashes and a sunscreen

 

honey-externally for serious burns/internally mix with garlic oil for an antibiotic and sore throat tx

 

tea tree essential oil-antiseptic/antifungal/insect bite tx/burn tx

 

lavender essential oil-analgesic/antiseptic/calming effect for insomnia,stress/skin care-rashes and cuts

 

peppermint essential oil-respiratory and nasal congestion/Headache tx 1 drop to temples or inhale vapors

/also good for digestive disorders/achy joints and muscle tx/ use 2 drops on toothbrush with baking soda

 

geranium essential oil- decreases bleeding when applied to wound/lowers blood sugar/burn tx

/antibacterial

 

thieves blend essential oil- combo of clove,lemon,cinnamon,eucalyptus and rosemary oils. Antibiotic

/antiseptic

 

chamomile tea bags- internally relaxing,headache tx and digestive problems/ external compress for burns,bee stings

 

ginger tea bags- internally good for nausea, stomachaches, digestive problems like gas and bloating, also good for motion sickness

 

echinacea/elderberry tea bags- supports immune system, decreases flu and cold duration

aloe vera

 

laxative tea bags- usually contains senna mixed with other herbs for a better flavor

 

powdered gatorade-for rehydration drinks ( to tx dehydration)

 

With the above list you can handle:

colds/flu/cough/sore throat/lund congestion

aches and pains

allergies/allergic reations

skin irritations and conditions

digestive upsets and nausea

constipation/diarrhea

bug bites/ bee stings/ contact dematitis( poison ivy/oak/)

burns/sunburn

minor cuts. scrapes and lacerations

headaches, sinus congestion

stress and anxiety

oral hygiene and basic dental tx

surface disinfectant

insect repellant

 

I know I forgot something!! I would say instant ice bags but they weigh a lot. I would vacuum pack all the tea bags into a very small package. I would also have DUCT tape, but thats already in a BOB. If you can't get demabond, superglue may burn like holy heck but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. In a collapse situation there will be a lot of improvising!! Also, make sure you get a small first aid pocket guide. CPR is only done with chest compressions so thats not hard to learn anymore. Dr Bones has recorded a suturing video, we just have to edit it first. I would have extra bandage scissors, tweezers and pen lights, not one of each.

I have part one of essential oils at www.doomandbloom.net so you can read more about them. They are a medicine chest from nature! They are also in very small vials, so they don't take up much space or add too much weight to the bag. I also have a few medicinal herb articles, which are helpful to know.

I gave you a lot of natural remedies because one day nature may be our pharmacy!!

 

I'll put together the "carry" kit soon.

I hope this helps everyone get started!

 

Thanks,

Nurse Amy

Edited by DrBonesNurseAmy

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Hi Zen:

 

May I also suggest you and your family take as many first aid classes, CPR classes, etc as you can? Contact your local Red Cross. If you've got a son or daughter in the Boy or Girl Scouts, they are now on the non-volunteer list for the First Aid merit badge (I've had several scout troops over the years, including a Brownie Troop and First Aid was ALWAYS top priority). Another thing is to get yourself an Army surplus suture kit, go to a medical supply store and get some suture material, watch a couple of videos on suturing on YouTube, then practice on an orange (it's very unlikely you'll find a volunteer).

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Guest zen811

Thanks for the great input Joe! That's a great idea to get the family and myself in courses. I've had a bit of training through the years but that stuff is definitely perishable. I think alot of the Red Cross and community courses are free as well. Sometimes with family especially, they are a bit more receptive to being taught by others than from their own parents/spouse although at a minimum it can help reinforce stuff they're already being taught at home. Also, practicing suture on an orange is a great idea too not only to practice for a first time but also to keep skills up.

 

Zen

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Hi GRoberson! Yes, I will let you know! We have the video, we just have to add the audio. This weekend we are in Denver presenting Collapse Medicine Part 1 and Part 2, so we are a little crazy busy right now. Monday we fly home and our goal is to have the audio finished by Wednesday. Part 1 of Collapse Medicine includes the various resources for training and how to put together a comprehensive list of medical needs for your family or survival group. The first 15 minutes can be found here:

 

 

The entire presentation was 90 minutes, which included suturing,lacerations, burns,fractures, gunshot wounds, and a whole lot more.

 

It is important to identify who you will be taking care of and any special needs they have. Learn the skills now and make sure you obtain a variety of medical books.

 

Thanks,

Nurse Amy

Edited by SurvivalCache
To embed the video in the post

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I'm glad to see someone mention essential oils for medical purposes. I didn't see it mentioned, but tobacco and tea bags can also be used as "drawing" poultices, especially for insect stings/bites. I used tobacco on a scorpion sting in Iraq. One of them little tan buggers got me on my left arm and I used Skoal as my poultice. I was definitely under the weather for about 2 weeks, but it worked.

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Hi Regulator,

 

Thanks so much for the great suggestion of tobacco! I did include 4 different teabags, but using them to draw out poison is a great idea. The chamomile tea bag is good internally, and also to sooth rashes and small burns externally.

Thanks again for your input, Nurse Amy:)

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Saliva is the best source to use for wetting these poultices also. My herbalist has tried water and other liquids, but saliva just works better according to his findings.

Most essential oils are also not fit for internal use, but there is 1 brand that is approved for internal use (I do not remember the brand, sorry). I use a mixture of essential oils for insect repellent as well.

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Hi Regulator,

 

Saliva may be all you have sometimes, but remember that there is bacteria in saliva which is partly the reasons why you can get sick from human and other animal bites. You're correct about the various essential oils as insect repellant. We use Neem oil in the garden. Other oils by the bug they are supposed to repel:

 

 

ANTS Peppermint, Spearmint

APHIDS Cedarwood ,Hyssop, Peppermint, Spearmint

BEETLES Peppermint, Thyme

CATERPILLARS Spearmint, Peppermint

CHIGGERS Lavender, Lemongrass, Sage, Thyme

CUTWORM Thyme, Sage

FLEAS Peppermint, Lemongrass, Spearmint, Lavender

FLIES Lavender, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage

GNATS Patchouli ,Spearmint

LICE Cedarwood, Peppermint, Spearmint

MOSQUITOES Lavender, Lemongrass

MOTHS Cedarwood,Hyssop, Lavender, Peppermint, Spearmint

PLANT LICE Peppermint, Spearmint

SLUGS Cedarwood ,Hyssop ,Pine

SNAILS Cedarwood, Pine, Patchouli

SPIDERS Peppermint,Spearmint

TICKS Lavender,Lemongrass, Sage, Thyme

WEEVILS Cedarwood, Patchouli ,Sandalwood

 

This list from the Oils for Wellness Blog. Add lemon balm to the mosquito repellants....

 

Dr. Bones

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One that I also add is garlic oil. Garlic seems to be a very good repellant for the bloodsuckers (I guess this may be where the legend/myth was born). I heard about eating lots of garlic to repel mosquitos and it seemed to work, so I also added the oil to my medicine bag. Of course wearing the medicine bag tends to illicit some negative commentary from people around me at times ( my wife especially).

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Ready, you can also get books on Native American herbology. One that seems to give some good advice and tries to give even pointers on conservationof the plants is written by Tis Mal Crow, "Native Plants, Native Healing: The Traditional Muskogee Way" ( about $10). It gives information on making your own essential oils and tinctures and the different uses of the plant to treat or help prevent conditions. I suggest trying to read several authors on the same subject to get multiple views and then they can be used to cross reference each other for accuracy.

Edited by Regulator5

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Hi Delta7 and Zen811,

 

Here is my list for BOB: tx=treatment

 

antiseptics-at least 2 different

oral antibiotics, may include garlic oil, honey,cayenne,thyme oil,peppermint oil and eucalyptus oil

antibiotic ointment

multi size bandages and ace bandages

gauze/dressings include telfa pads and xeroform petroleum dressings (non stick)

ABD pads

tapes

quality bandage scissor/trauma shear

4 pair or more nitrile gloves

masks, surgical(for sick people) and N-95(for healthy people)

dermabond/needle holder and sutures

tweezers

several large and small size safety pins

magnifying glass

pen light

tongue depressor(s)

clotting powders/dressings

quality tourniquet

olaes modular bandage

Q-tips

cravet triangle bandage

snake bit kit

rubber bag (hot water bottle)

 

dental kit /and extra clove oil(numbs pain, and good for minor burns when mixed with geranium oil)

 

claritin (non-drowsy antihistamine)- hay fever/allergies

 

benadryl ( drowsy antihistamine)-allergic reactions to stings/medication/food/contact with irritants/this is the other ingerdient in tylenol PM! It really puts you to sleep at 50mg dose, but this is a better dose for serious allergic reactions!

 

epi-pen, if needed for serious allergic reactions

 

sudafed-decongestant,

 

eucalyptus essential oil- also a decongestant and good for coughs/ also a good insect repellent

 

pain relievers- asprin/tylenol/ibuprofen

 

immodium-for diarrhea tx

 

hydrocortisone cream-anti-inflammatory

 

helichrysum essential oil- also anti-inflammatory and additionally an analgesic

 

Lip balm-I love carmex brand

 

zinc oxide-rashes and a sunscreen

 

honey-externally for serious burns/internally mix with garlic oil for an antibiotic and sore throat tx

 

tea tree essential oil-antiseptic/antifungal/insect bite tx/burn tx

 

lavender essential oil-analgesic/antiseptic/calming effect for insomnia,stress/skin care-rashes and cuts

 

peppermint essential oil-respiratory and nasal congestion/Headache tx 1 drop to temples or inhale vapors

/also good for digestive disorders/achy joints and muscle tx/ use 2 drops on toothbrush with baking soda

 

geranium essential oil- decreases bleeding when applied to wound/lowers blood sugar/burn tx

/antibacterial

 

thieves blend essential oil- combo of clove,lemon,cinnamon,eucalyptus and rosemary oils. Antibiotic

/antiseptic

 

chamomile tea bags- internally relaxing,headache tx and digestive problems/ external compress for burns,bee stings

 

ginger tea bags- internally good for nausea, stomachaches, digestive problems like gas and bloating, also good for motion sickness

 

echinacea/elderberry tea bags- supports immune system, decreases flu and cold duration

aloe vera

 

laxative tea bags- usually contains senna mixed with other herbs for a better flavor

 

powdered gatorade-for rehydration drinks ( to tx dehydration)

 

With the above list you can handle:

colds/flu/cough/sore throat/lund congestion

aches and pains

allergies/allergic reations

skin irritations and conditions

digestive upsets and nausea

constipation/diarrhea

bug bites/ bee stings/ contact dematitis( poison ivy/oak/)

burns/sunburn

minor cuts. scrapes and lacerations

headaches, sinus congestion

stress and anxiety

oral hygiene and basic dental tx

surface disinfectant

insect repellant

 

I know I forgot something!! I would say instant ice bags but they weigh a lot. I would vacuum pack all the tea bags into a very small package. I would also have DUCT tape, but thats already in a BOB. If you can't get demabond, superglue may burn like holy heck but sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do. In a collapse situation there will be a lot of improvising!! Also, make sure you get a small first aid pocket guide. CPR is only done with chest compressions so thats not hard to learn anymore. Dr Bones has recorded a suturing video, we just have to edit it first. I would have extra bandage scissors, tweezers and pen lights, not one of each.

I have part one of essential oils at www.doomandbloom.net so you can read more about them. They are a medicine chest from nature! They are also in very small vials, so they don't take up much space or add too much weight to the bag. I also have a few medicinal herb articles, which are helpful to know.

I gave you a lot of natural remedies because one day nature may be our pharmacy!!

 

I'll put together the "carry" kit soon.

I hope this helps everyone get started!

 

Thanks,

Nurse Amy

i would like to add a few oils.pine needle oil,myrrh,frankincence,leaves of sage(which is native american)almost no weight.

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You medical kit should be organized based on several factors. First, as you mentioned in your question, where is it going to be carried or stored and secondly what enviroment are you planning on being in and finally what is your training to use the items in your kit. It would be difficult to go into great detail here. But as an example, if you are looking to put together a kit for your BOB, then you want minimal items that are light weight and to not take up too much room. If it is in the winter time then you need very little supplies for insect bites. Those are limited examples. So your medical kit may need to be changed out depending on the time of year and whether it is going to be in your BOB, storded in you house or get away and or if it is in your car. You also need to conisder if you have kids and any medical conditions any one in your family is being treated for, so there are many many things to consider when putting together your medical kit. To best understand what you need in your medical kit I highly recommed you seriously consider taking a medical first aid or EMT course.

Edited by Dan4010

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All excellent information. I will be showing this thread to my wife who is currently taking an at home herbology course. She is our herb/oil person. I also look forward to seeing the suture video, I have the sutures (which I recieved from my dermatologist when I went in for my skin check) but have never used them. Also we bought several "disposable skin staple kits" which is made for dogs, but can be used for anyone. Also has anyone had any experience using "Quick-clot"? again, something I have, but have never used. Thanks for the info and input.

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I hit up my EMTs for spare stuff all the time(i work in a Nurseing home) and have gotten a nice collection of stuff.I will be working on the herbs this year and growing what I can.

Thanks for the great list.

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Sorry but I didn't have a chance to read through all the posts so sorry if my question is redunant but how long is a med kit good for? (generally) We have all run across a first aid kit that looks like it has been sitting around since the civil war and all the bandages are yellow and unsure if you would want to use anything in the box and it might have only been sitting there for a year or two...

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