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kevin

Wild edibles

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Around 15 years ago I started my journey as a prepper. In addition to a reasonable supply of food stuffs and an unreasonable supply of ammo I wanted to add skills to compliment my new way of life.

One of the first skills I chose to work on was identifing wild plants as food and medicine. When I first started I knew maybe 10 plants which is above average...but all true Texas country boys have chewed a stem of sour dock (sheep's soral) at one time or another. Now 15 years in I am able to identify 120+ by name and usage. It has even begin to rub of on my wife and son. ( the boy is well ahead of where I was at 13 )

The hardest part of learning all these plants was finding a book or web site that had good reliable pictures and descriptions of each plant. Most books are nearly useless....half the web sites are just plane wrong. 

Since I already have done the leg work to find the best places to study plants I thought share them with you.

By far the sharpest "plant guy" I have ever known is Mark "Merriwether" Vorderbruggen. He has a book out that is far and away the best wild edible book I have ever used. "Idiots guide to foraging" is 10 out of 10 stars imho. You can find it for about $15 at the other best place....his web site "Foraging Texas" . I know it says Texas but most of the plants talked about are found thru out the south...and a large portion are nation wide.

If you ever have the chance to take Dr Vorderbruggen's wild edibles hike\class I highly recommend it as well.....yeah I'm a fan. 

wally and juzcallmesnake like this

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Kevin completely I agree with people learning their local flora and fauna, I love Sassafras home made root beer if you know the leaves and the leaves are also known as gumbo File' powder when ground. making the root beer is easy take some feeder root remove the dark skin crush a bit and bring to almost a boil and let steep add to water to taste if you want like soda add a block of dry ice if you don't have dry ice collect frozen co2 from blasting a co2 fire extinguisher into a loose knit bag and pour the crystals / chunks in, and you have root beer soda pop.

I have books and I look for the color pictures that well document the identity from other plants and in different stages, as many do not take on their adult characteristics early on,

People really forget that for aesthetic reason America has imported plants that are NOT domestic and most are dangerous to deadly like poinsettias and elephant ears. I raise Horseradish and if I were not familiar I would pass it by potatoes are dangerous believe it or not just like many plants only parts are edible not the entire plant.

Pardon me if I rail on spices as almost all spices are not indigenous we import them by the ship load and if people want variety and their favorite tastes they had better stock up.

Smoking meat is easy but in order to keep it safe from insects coating it with crushed birdseye peppers or chili pequines that are found along creeks and rivers here helps meat last many seasons.

I am reposting this but, although not a spice it is not found in the wild and we use it by the ton and that is Baking powder here is a recipe

Baking Powder makes 1 tablespoon

1 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons cream of tartar (now you know what this is for) and it is used to make meringue / egg whites stiff and peak. comes from wine barrel wine making sediment.

add 1 teaspoon of corn starch to prevent caking and reacting before adding to ingredients. store in an air tight container until needed.

people need to read on how to prepare / process acorns as some varieties have too much tannin / tannic acid to be eaten as is and the husk of the nut should be removed as it contains a lot of the tannic acid. that is another area where study and compiling a survival notebook well serve people well even if only camping and hiking.

Many medicinal plants have spines or stinging hairs or hard to process / digest veins edible or inedible berries fruits or seeds.  Polk sallet comes to mind as a edible that if not prepared right is toxic / poisonous like FUGU or puffer fish great stuff but joe bob is not filleting it for me just because he got a set of Ginsu knives !

Knowledge practice experience and then there are mushrooms a real hard subject as some very experienced pickers have been fooled by a fungi that looked almost right. I leave them to the professionals.

 

 

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I gave $50 for the ultimate guide to mushrooms books. Worth every penny. It taught me to leave the mushrooms alone....to many variables.

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Yea Kevin that's about what I cam up with :o

Fungus or fungi / mushrooms spores float on the wind and when they deposit on an agreeable stratum like a dead tree trunk or whatever they seem to thrive on they grow so if the tree was killed by a defoliant or there are other chemical or organisms they get imparted so about the only mushrooms that I feel are safe are ones grown from spores that have been gotten from a medium started by a grower lets say contained spores and they have facilities to test the earth they use and the final product some here are grown in caves / a closed system so foreign spores are not easily introduced

In the wild as you perfectly state too many variables of color size and medium on where they grow.  I don't know how man ever survived by trying them --- hey bob how do you know we can eat that kind because Pete din't die when he ate one !

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Exactly. I have been kicking around the idea of growing some in the rabbit poop but I know next to nothing about mushroom growing ......after I get a handle on the bee hive we just got a week or 2 back I may start doing research on the viability of it.

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12 hours ago, kevin said:

Exactly. I have been kicking around the idea of growing some in the rabbit poop but I know next to nothing about mushroom growing ......after I get a handle on the bee hive we just got a week or 2 back I may start doing research on the viability of it.

you can buy kits but some require cool and dark  area to thrive that lets me out as here it is average of 85 to 95 degrees most of the year if it is not too hot it's too cold, technically winter here is mid December to early February or about 2 months then cool for a couple weeks and right back into warm to hot weather.

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I have seen grow your own mushroom kits in grocery stores before. I bought one once. It worked on a very small scale, but it sent spoors out everywhere (I had it inside) and that that annoyed me...so I tossed it. LOL.

I have an excellent book for Foraging in the Midwest. It's called Midwest Foraging by Lisa Rose. She grew up foraging. I like this book because it discusses plants in seasons and when they are used - in color - and what parts to use.

It also gives basic warnings of not foraging near RR tracks (chemical seepage from the RR ties) or roads (run off).

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On 10/13/2017 at 9:27 AM, juzcallmesnake said:

you can buy kits but some require cool and dark  area to thrive that lets me out as here it is average of 85 to 95 degrees most of the year if it is not too hot it's too cold, technically winter here is mid December to early February or about 2 months then cool for a couple weeks and right back into warm to hot weather.

Yeah .....I'm in Texas too. Lol

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9 hours ago, MommyLiberty5013 said:

I have seen grow your own mushroom kits in grocery stores before. I bought one once. It worked on a very small scale, but it sent spoors out everywhere (I had it inside) and that that annoyed me...so I tossed it. LOL.

I have an excellent book for Foraging in the Midwest. It's called Midwest Foraging by Lisa Rose. She grew up foraging. I like this book because it discusses plants in seasons and when they are used - in color - and what parts to use.

It also gives basic warnings of not foraging near RR tracks (chemical seepage from the RR ties) or roads (run off).

Her book was mentioned in the class we took. The fellow who gives the class has about 10 books he recommends ...hers was on the list.

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5 hours ago, kevin said:

Yeah .....I'm in Texas too. Lol

I am annoyed by the influx of commiefornians screw up their hole and want to spread out and turn the rest of the country into a cesspool

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You and me both. I was born in boxelder Texas...24 people strong...and have never lived in any other state. I'm not taking common sense and family values to their state...so they can keep their liberal transgender values to their f#$×ing selves.

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Weinstein accused by over a dozen women and on the left all you hear is crickets (crickets another wild edible) :P --- but they are all about womens and people of colors rights unless the people accused are power brokers or filthy rich and donate crazy sums of money then the victims are gold diggers or crazy.

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