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Arrows???

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As Snake mentioned in my other thread, I'm going to take my bow to Academy Sports and have them go over it. For 40 bucks they will go through the bow, make sure it's sound, re-check draw length based on my measurements, re-tune it, re-adjust draw weight, check for cracks, check strings and cables, etc. So, I have noticed that you pretty much "build" arrows. Does anyone have an Arrow Building For Dummies rundown??? Lol.

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Academy Sport will fit you with the proper Arrow for you and your bow,take there advice about arrows,purchace a couple then shop around for a couple dozen and field points.

As stated in other thread, your razor point and the field point should be the same weight.

Practice much.

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There are several books on arrow building out there. The hard part is getting the correct "twist" on your fletching. I would recommend an arrow jig if you truly plan on making your own. If using real feathers, as will be needed after an event, then use feathers from the same wing. The lay of the feathers from a left and right wing are different and will throw your arrow off target. The twist in the fletching is similiar to rifling and if you have rifling going in both directions, it will cause issues.

On broadheads, they have chisel points as well as razor points. The difference is relatively small, in ways. The chisel point will break a bone easier and punch through but a razor point works better (IMHO) on soft tissue for slicing through (especially on woven fabric if you know what I mean). I use a 2 blade broadheads myself.

http://bowsite.com/BOWSITE/features/articles/equipment/penetration/

here is a site that did some testing and has lots of info for those interested in archery as a survival tool/skill. I've seen some bad hits lead to lots of after action work by trailing a deer. As Matt stated, practice much. This not only perfects accuracy but also developes the muscles used for archery; starting to shake from muscle failure at a crucial time can be risky and cost you a nice venison roast. In the end, it's personal and "equipment" preference. What works great for one bow may be a failure on another, same with people's styles. The basics are usually the same but fine tuning yourself to your equipment makes a better tool.

Edited by Regulator5
clarity

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