Sign in to follow this  
Texas Bill

Survival Fiction or Learning is Fun!

Recommended Posts

Guys, I gotta say for fun reading nothing beats a Kindle. I agree with the Captain and Oregonchick about maintaining situational awareness, but for sheer volume and price, I love it. I'm currently reading Wanted by Jason Halstead, which has some interesting stuff on post-nuke bunkers. Pretty good action book, not a lot of deep thinking here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest kevin

hunger games must be action packed.....i do the maintenance on the local hollywood theaters(one of three businesses i tinker with).....man the damage to the ones showing hunger games is double of those showing other movies, may just be the youth attendees tho.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I LOVE it! I just found and read this topic and can't wait to start some of these that I've missed. I am all over the Heinlein and L'Amour books and am in the middle of the second Monster Hunters Int. right now!

 

One of my old favorites is Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. It is a true after the end story where the world gets smacked by a big old rock. They also wrote one called Footfall about an Alien invasion scenario.

 

It's been mentions but Alas Babylon is a must read and worth mentioning again as is Farnum's Freehold from Heinlein.

 

On a lighter note William Johnstone's Ashes series is interesting and survival oriented.

 

I have a Kindle and a Nook and each has its strengths and weaknesses. The NOOK is far superior to the kindle if you want to read PDF. Man you can buy literally thousands of books at a time in PDF format. The Kindle just doesn't like to read anything much more than Amazon Kindle books. I have experience with the Kindle Keypad and the Newer Kindle Touch and neither does PDFs very well compared to the Nook from Barnes and Nobles. I have the Mother Earth news on CD in PDF format and it reads fine on the Nook and is more trouble than it is worth on the Kindles. I don't mind scrolling up and down but having to go back and forth sucks. The Nook sizes it to the page width and even when you change the font it is still page width. The Kindle seems to make it so you are either reading with a font that is too small for my old eyes or the view is wider than the page. On the Kindle Keypad I flip it on its side and that helped but the Touch won't let you do that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I LOVE it! I just found and read this topic and can't wait to start some of these that I've missed. I am all over the Heinlein and L'Amour books and am in the middle of the second Monster Hunters Int. right now!

 

One of my old favorites is Lucifer's Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. It is a true after the end story where the world gets smacked by a big old rock. They also wrote one called Footfall about an Alien invasion scenario.

 

It's been mentions but Alas Babylon is a must read and worth mentioning again as is Farnum's Freehold from Heinlein.

 

On a lighter note William Johnstone's Ashes series is interesting and survival oriented.

 

I have a Kindle and a Nook and each has its strengths and weaknesses. The NOOK is far superior to the kindle if you want to read PDF. Man you can buy literally thousands of books at a time in PDF format. The Kindle just doesn't like to read anything much more than Amazon Kindle books. I have experience with the Kindle Keypad and the Newer Kindle Touch and neither does PDFs very well compared to the Nook from Barnes and Nobles. I have the Mother Earth news on CD in PDF format and it reads fine on the Nook and is more trouble than it is worth on the Kindles. I don't mind scrolling up and down but having to go back and forth sucks. The Nook sizes it to the page width and even when you change the font it is still page width. The Kindle seems to make it so you are either reading with a font that is too small for my old eyes or the view is wider than the page. On the Kindle Keypad I flip it on its side and that helped but the Touch won't let you do that.

I currently have the Kindle, but I used to have a Nook app on my old smartphone, loved it. Another book I recently read I liked...Earth Abides by George R. Stewart, very good story about a survivor of a pandemic, and how he deals with his situation, couldn't put it down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished 77 Days in September by Ray Gorham. Interesting book about EMP but not a lot of useful prepper information, since the protagonist, a young father trying to get home to his family in Montana, is a bit of a goober. I cringed every time he had to make a decision since most often he turned out to be wrong. Fortunately, he meets several Good Samaritans along the way to bail him out.

 

Also, I read What So Proudly We Hailed by James Howard last week. This is basically a call to arms to the Christians of America to prepare for the End of Days and to fight the Muslims who are trying to take over our country and impose Sharia Law following a "limited" nuclear war. Really sort of offensive to anyone who is not a Evangelical Christian, since they are apparently the only ones who can see the coming Apocalypse and are willing to resist with prayer while everyone else is falling all over themselves to bow to the Beast. I am not bashing Christians, being one myself, but I am really tired of these guys presenting themselves as the only real Christians. Author also takes a swipe at the Catholic Church for being tricked into going along with the new charismatic Islamic leader who is clearly the Anti-Christ. Come on, can't we all get along?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find I'm reading a LOT of older stuff that is free or $.99 on my Kindle Fire. Wife is doing the same on her Kindle. Problem is I can order on line books with the Kindle - you can spend a LOT of money at $.99 a pop if you're not careful! My other issue is some book I really want are simply not available on the Kindle. (things like Pournelle's "there will be war" series of books. I want the set, but I'd rather have them on Kindle instead of paper back. Oh, well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Capt.

 

You might want to try some publishers directly. I know Baen Books has a Free Library and offers other books as well at discount prices, and I understand that the format is Kindle friendly. I loved Andre Norton as a kid and I think they have most of her books available. Also, I check for free downloads as well on Kindle. There's a lot of the classics available that way. I really enjoyed the "There Will Be War" series and I remember discovering several promising young (and not so young) authors there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished Invasion USA Book 1 last night and I am downloading Book 2 today. Not exactly Shakespeare here, but interesting look at a Chinese plot where all of their stuff manufactured in electronics in the last 30 years goes off at the same time. America, and the world, is in chaos as a result, and the Chinese forces (led by a vast multinational that has subverted the Chinese government) are hell bent on world domination. Kind of hokey, but scary too given the wholesale takeover of the electronics market by Chinese companies that are all somehow related. Is it Foxcom that manufactures 80% of the consumer electronics in the US?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Folks, I got an odd one for you this time. Bystander by Carolyn Evans-Dean popped up as an Amazon recommends based on my previous purchases and at first I thought it was an error. Looks like a romance, starts like a romance, and then all the sudden becomes a book about survival in a small community setting in upstate New York. Our protagonist is an African-American would-be Martha Stewart who moves to the quaint little town of Bystander, NY following the death of her husband with the idea of starting her own "Sustainable Homestead" as a way of catapulting her brand and website (since she is an accomplished home and garden writer) into prominence. Then, the unthinkable happens and she figures out she is going to have to do this stuff for real.

 

The book is an easy read and has characters you can easily identify with after only a few pages. There is depth here, from great prepper tips to thoughts on race relations (very interesting from her perspective) and the author writes with an easy grace. Not a lot of action or derring-do, but the day-today problems of making do without the outside help we all are accustomed to is educational. If you are a husband having a difficult time bringing your wives around to the prepper mentality, this would be a great way of doing that. Honestly, though it is sexist of me, I found the book to be more oriented towards the ladies, but I did find it very enjoyable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Folks, I got an odd one for you this time. Bystander by Carolyn Evans-Dean popped up as an Amazon recommends based on my previous purchases and at first I thought it was an error. Looks like a romance, starts like a romance, and then all the sudden becomes a book about survival in a small community setting in upstate New York. Our protagonist is an African-American would-be Martha Stewart who moves to the quaint little town of Bystander, NY following the death of her husband with the idea of starting her own "Sustainable Homestead" as a way of catapulting her brand and website (since she is an accomplished home and garden writer) into prominence. Then, the unthinkable happens and she figures out she is going to have to do this stuff for real.

 

The book is an easy read and has characters you can easily identify with after only a few pages. There is depth here, from great prepper tips to thoughts on race relations (very interesting from her perspective) and the author writes with an easy grace. Not a lot of action or derring-do, but the day-today problems of making do without the outside help we all are accustomed to is educational. If you are a husband having a difficult time bringing your wives around to the prepper mentality, this would be a great way of doing that. Honestly, though it is sexist of me, I found the book to be more oriented towards the ladies, but I did find it very enjoyable.

My wife loves to read, but isn't a prepper, maybe this book will give her a nudge in the right direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just read Bystander. I liked it! It wasn't as prepping tip intensive as some of the recommended books are, but it did give a lot of good information about homesteading and the difference between doing it as a hobby and doing it because you have no choice. It's definitely a romance novel, and has strong Christian values entwined in it (so no gratuitous sex and swearing) but doesn't come off as formulaic or preachy.

 

I did love the irony of setting up her Martha Stewart-type home garden for the purpose of becoming a brand and having a popular, money-generating blog, and almost immediately losing power and the internet and, well, the use of money. LOL I wish there had been more diving into the potential conflict between giving to others vs. saving what you need, but overall, it was a good, fast, enjoyable read. Thanks for the recommendation!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, Oregonchick. I am glad you enjoyed it. I really liked it when Ellie blew her top and told the rest of the town to go stuff it. I was also surprised that the author managed to walk the line between strong Christian values without tipping over into the preachy.

 

Jerry, if your wife reads any kind of romance she will like this one and maybe it will open her eyes a bit. Plus, nothing objectionable in here so it is suitable for the kids as well. I thought about recommending it to my wife, but she only enjoys non-fiction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it was nice to see Ellie finally point out that they were living off of HER smarts and labor and that of Skeeter, and that they'd better fly right or starve. I also like that the dig early in the book, about finding websites with "gun crazed rednecks talking about zombies" when she was looking for off-the-grid/prepping advice, was answered definitively with her own experience of being saved by some off-the-grid, gun-happy neighbors. ;)

 

I wanted to tell her, "See? It sounds crazy... until it sounds like common sense." LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually laughed out loud at the "gun-crazed rednecks talking about zombies" comment because the author showed she was not too proud to make her protagonist a prissy missy. Skeet reminds me a lot of some good old boys I grew up with. Minus the degree from Cornell.

 

Btw, I am now reading Caretaker by Richard Clem and it is stil early in the book but so far an insightful look at a handful of survivors after a catastrophic flu pandemic. Author makes a good point about the fragile infrastructure, as was glimpsed in the miniseries After People. Sobering...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, man. The pandemic scenarios are actually the ones that freak me out the most because it's such a horrifying combination of random chance (are you exposed? are you immune? do you have access to medical care?) and just overwhelmingly bad possible outcomes. I think it's why zombie stuff gets me; it's not so much the horror factor of brainless flesh-eaters chasing us endlessly, it's just how quickly it spreads and how helpless we are in the face of it.

 

So I'll add that to my list. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished Caretaker last night. Nice start but just sort of limped along after the first few chapters. Shorter than I expected and nothing really happened except a small group of survivors decide to live together on a farm. The end. I don't need Mad Max, but absolutely no tension in the whole story. I've seen it done better, and the characters never got developed beyond a simple descriptive phrase. Worth it if offered for free but in retrospect I doubt I would have paid had I known what it was going in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just read what might be the worst post-apocalypse survival book I've run across in a long time. Extinction Point by Paul Jones had some really positive reviews on Amazon so I gave it a shot, and then I kept waiting for it to finally end. I hate to second guess an author's plot, he is the one telling the story, after all, but this one just left me scratching my head. On the other hand, his spelling and verb agreements usually matched, so the grammar reviewers cut him some slack.

 

His protagonist, the utterly bland Emily, is a reporter for a New York newspaper and a thoroughly converted urbanite. So New York, in fact, that she can't drive. Okay, I can see that, except this is a woman who grew up on a farm in Iowa. I just CANNOT see her as unable to shift a car into drive and get the heck off the island. Instead, we have to suffer through days of her preparing to leave by bike, while monsters are popping up left and right (including in the apartment just above hers). Completely unbelievable that she would stick around except this plot device lets the author build in some really scary scenes (which did work, but felt contrived). Nothing useful survival wise, or much in the way of entertainment either, in this pile of dreck. Sorry, just my opinion, but one other thing did bug me as well. If she was a reporter, going to travel cross-country to meet up with a conclave of scientists outside the affected area, wouldn't you expect her to, well, report on what she has seen? She is going to relate her adventures to these scientists, but never stops to take a picture? Just did not ring with me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just finished reading When There's No More Room in Hell by Luke Duffy and giving it the thumb's up over in the zombie section, but this book impressed me so much I decided to post here as well. This book was written by a former British marine who worked private security in Iraq after he demobbed (I think that is the proper Britishism), and he has managed to write a terrifying novel about what would really happen if the dead got up and started causing a ruckus. The story is told from several points of view but mainly deals with a pair of brothers, one working private security in Iraq and his younger sibling working a braindead (pun intended) warehouse job back in Jolly Olde England.

 

I dropped this here because take out the zombies and drop in civil unrest or flu pandemic and you have muh the same story. The fall of civilization takes time, and some areas may go unaffected while others are completely overrun. Plus, the story of the elder brother Marcus and his amazing trip accross the Middle East and Europe to get home is awesome. For his crew, zombies are the least of his troubles.

 

Fair warning- this book is raw and hard to read at times dues to the graphic nature of the topic. Bad things happen and the author is not bashful in describing the bloody mayhem. On the other hand, the edit and polish is pretty good. Nice description on how to get out of an ambush and how to assault a numerically superior force. The guy knows his stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is anyone here reading Susan Gregersen? She has several short little books on Amazon that I found very interesting and informative. She writes fiction from a definite prepper perspective and I find her to be very entertaining. So far I have read The Long Ride Home, The Rally Point and Over the River and Through the Woods. The Long Ride Home is about a grandma on a biking trip across the US when the country is hit with an EMP attack. The story details her trek, and offers some real tips when it comes to such "adventures". Mad Max this isn't, but still a gripping tale. Read first, then read Rally Point, which is the story of how her family copes with the attack while she is making her way home. Only 99 cents each! Let me know what you guys think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is anyone here reading Susan Gregersen?

 

Hadn't heard of her, but among the books she has listed on Amazon is a $0.99 eBook called Poverty Prepping: How to Stock up For Tomorrow When You Can't Afford To Eat Today. The reviewers say that it's filled with practical advice, and the premise is that some people don't prep because they are too overwhelmed to start or they think that they need to sink thousands and thousands of dollars into preps like the folks on Doomsday Preppers do. This is just a method for getting started on a budget; might be a useful resource for the rest of us!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have Poverty Prepping on my Kindle but I have not read it yet since i am reading her fiction first. I like her writing style and the practical ideas she puts out there. Not all about guns and ammo, and instead she focuses more on the food and shelter aspects.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a nice e-mail from Susan Gregersen letting me know she is working on a sequel to Long Ride Home and Rally Point. No release date yet but I finished her other books and now I am waiting impatiently for the next. Her books are actually novella length so you can plow through pretty quick. All of her titles are available for 99 cents and there's enough good stuff in here for me to wish she would bundle them into a trade paperback and sell as a hardcopy set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • This is a great inspiring article. I am pretty much pleased with your good work. You put really very helpful information.
       
    • here is the survival coupons codes to get a amazing material of survival struggling 
    • Hey all, This is sort of cool (okay really cool) and maybe some of you have heard about it because it's been plastered over FOX and mentioned by POTUS as well as other conservative-leaning news people (Huckabee, Diamond/Silk, Candace Owens, Mark Levin, etc..) and politicians. #walkaway is a movement based mostly on social media. Started last year, by Brandon Straka (pronounced Strawk - like "straw" with a "k"). He's a former 2016 HRC-voting hair stylist, from NE, now in NYC, homosexual, liberal who began to question the MSM and what he was hearing. He got really frustrated as he began to do his own research. Anyway, after having his own awakening to the lies of MSM he had been following, he began an online testimonial campaign in which former liberals can post their #walkaway stories, written or video. Many are now on the "Trump Train." Many have simply left the Left. Still, others have always been non-Left and are members in support. The amazing thing is how many different people from all walks of life are beginning to wake up. Lots are not conservative on all issues, but all have a love for the USA and dislike the demonization of open political and social thinkers and speakers. This group gives solace to people scared to voice their conservative opinions or views for fear of negative professional or personal responses. It now has budding smaller groups in all 50 states and an online discussion group where people discuss current topics or issues (WITH no vitriol, gasp).  Here's the original video from Brandon.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=51UGcghHZsk This man, Brandon has a unique, stylish, well-articulated voice to help move people "in hiding" out into the open and not be silenced. Pretty much any video Brandon does is great. Here is the Facebook page: www.facebook.com/groups/OFFICIALwalkawaycampaign/ As I see fights erupt online, I simply leave #walkaway in the comments. Brandon has a goal of 1 million members! The liberal media has called this campaign "Russian Bots" and "paid actors." It's not!!!        
    • thanks to all who  have served or are serving our great country....243 years in the making....   Trump did a good job today thanking each branch of our military and a long time coming salute to the coast guard too....
    • I can imagine food prices going up this Fall or Winter. Corn is used for live stock feed, & us humans consume a lot of corn based products, as well as corn based biofuel. I’ve been keeping a watchful eye on the mid-west of America, which is flooded by water. Where corn  & other crops are normally grown there. Farmers are quite worried about this years growing season. Time to stock up on extra food if you can, if you haven’t already. Stack it high, stack it deep. Store the foods that you normally eat. What ever the  amount of food you’ve stored,  try to double it if possible. Better extra safe, than sorry.