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Texas Bill

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Wow, it's hard to keep up with all the recommendations. Texas, I'm about half way through Against the Grain. You're righ that the story grows on you. Hope you enjoy Shelter.

 

Just finished ANNIE by Lenore McKelvey Puhek (2009-10-30). ANNIE (Kindle ). A TRUE STORY From slavery To A Montana Homestead.* Philipsburg, Montana Territory. * 1833 – 1914. It was very informative about the time. Finished and found a full length bonus novel at the end. Oregonchick is probably familiar with the area.

 

EMP and Earthfall are good reads too. Read 'THE MARTIAN' about a man stranded on mars. Excellent read.

 

Ya'll take care. My writing has been nada for the last two weeks. Developed tendonitis in my right wrist-- probably from trying to write three sequels to novels at one time.

 

Terry

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Terry, take care of that wrist. A lot of us are depending on it so you can get those sequels done! I really enjoyed Earthfall, too. I told Steve it reminded me of Damnation Alley with Jan Michael Vincent and Ernest Borgnine. I loved that movie, cheese and all.

 

I caught Dark Days Rough Roads by Matthew Mark on sale for $3.99 and found some really cool ideas in there. A little too pat, a little too prepared on a cop's salary, but good escapist reading.

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I just finished Eden's Warriors by Lloyd Tackitt. I have enjoyed the series and the latest entry was good as well. I like Adrian as the main character, as he is a larger than life creation and fits well with what the author wants to do here.

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Just finished ANNIE by Lenore McKelvey Puhek (2009-10-30). ANNIE (Kindle ). A TRUE STORY From slavery To A Montana Homestead.* Philipsburg, Montana Territory. * 1833 – 1914. It was very informative about the time. Finished and found a full length bonus novel at the end. Oregonchick is probably familiar with the area.

 

Holy cow, I actually lived just outside Philipsburg for about a year. That's crazy! I'll have to check this out.

 

Hope that your wrist feels better soon, and not just because I want more books from you (although I do!) but because it's such an ordeal trying to handle things when you have chronic pain of any kind. Take care of yourself!

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I just finished Eden's Warriors by Lloyd Tackitt. I have enjoyed the series and the latest entry was good as well. I like Adrian as the main character, as he is a larger than life creation and fits well with what the author wants to do here.

 

Even if I didn't already love this series - and I do - I would want to download the book based on the description. It totally cracked me up:

 

... Before he gets there he unintentionally rescues several girls, and has no idea how to get rid of them, so he does what comes naturally and trains them in hunting and combat proficiency - turning them into a tough and deadly fighting unit...

 

Definitely sounds like something Adrian would stumble into - and like a solution he'd come up with!

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I really enjoyed how Adrian's fame spread by short wave and word of mouth, just because ti was a good story. Some people heard of his fight against the Louisiana raiders and others his war against the Colorado cannibals, but everybody heard the story of how he sired a bunch of bear cubs. Too funny. Also his reaction of horror at being responsible for the girls was appropriate for a guy like him. Train them up to be little troopers so they never have to face the same thing again.

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Loved, loved, loved Eden's Warriors. Adrian's reaction - the discomfort of being in charge of two girls, the suspicion and anger when he realized what was really going on, then the almost terror when he realized he now had 16 young girls to take care of - was priceless. And his decision afterward made so much sense to his mindset: if he had been hurt, he would want to learn how to protect himself from future danger. So he did the same thing for the girls. Adrian's Angels. Race's Rangers. LOL

 

What I kept thinking, as the book progressed, was that Mr. Tackitt was a bit of a military historian himself because Adrian? He's George Washington. In case there's any doubt about the parallels between Adrian's response and that of our first president, ere's an article about George Washington, the Reluctant President: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history-archaeology/George-Washington-The-Reluctant-President.html

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I enjoy that, too. It's not enough to simply not die at TEOTWAWKI. We have to have something to live for, and hopefully part of that would be creating something good and meaningful and lasting out of the chaos. I also think that, for this series, there are good points about not being able to simply resurrect the US but instead having to do something on a smaller scale.

 

FWIW, I also thought using the Republic of Texas as a starting point was genius. It's one of the few states that has its own almost "nationalistic" identity apart from its place in the US, and that territory has a long history of independent people banding together to repel oppressors and establish order for decent people.

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OC, we got folks down here who are already wanting a return of the Republic of Texas. Of course, the first and only Republic of Texas barely limped along for ten years, broke and vulnerable to attacks from outlaws, angry Native tribes (Sam Houston treated them right only to have legislation Houston championed reversed by that scumbag Lamar when he took office), and the ever-present threat of the Mexican Army.

 

BTW, if you ever get a chance, read up some on the life of Sam Houston. He was a fascinating guy and sadly, he died in 1863 seeing his beloved Texas embroiled in the Civil War he opposed.

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Thanks for the recommendation. Some men (and women) really led such amazing lives and accomplished remarkable things. Pity that Sam Houston lived to see that, but not to see Texas come out the other side of it. We can only hope that people will learn from history... although, of course, evidence shows us that we often don't! LOL

 

In Oregon, the closest we get to any causes are some people who used to talk about annexing northern California since it's more like Oregon than the rest of that state (the idea was to create a bigger region called "Cascadia" for some reason). Anyway, after all of California's budget problems, I don't think that people are quite as eager to adopt that pack of troubles as they might have once been.

 

Texas has a lot going for it and I wonder if people from neighboring states will try to get there should TSHTF. One of Oregon's primary benefits in a SHTF situation, I think, is that we aren't as populous or well-known as neighboring states. When people think of the west coast, they usually think of California and sometimes Seattle (but not even so much the state of Washington). We don't have major military installations or wealth centers, and essentially have only one "real" city (Portland) and a few large towns. So we hopefully won't attract quite so many random people to us in a crisis. I-5 could be problematic, and if there's an influx of roving gangs/cartels we might have issues because they already are familiar with using the interstate for trafficking. And I suppose if we were invaded by China or North Korea or something we'd pretty much be SOL because they could walk right up on our beaches. But other than that, it's not a bad place to hunker down, IMO.

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I personally love Oregon from the half dozen times I have been there. I think it would be a good place to hunker down, outside of Portland, of course. In a SHTF scenario, the problem with Texas is the existence of the Big Three: Houston, DFW, and San Antonio. Huge population centers, already high crime rates, and at least in San Antonio and Houston, already highly infiltrated by the Mexican gangs and cartels. We have a border that is a joke and much of West Texas is just untenable for food production without irrigation. Lloyd Tackitt's first book, A Distant Eden, is pretty much dead on about how things would go in the Dallas area. I lived up there for about five years and I could see that happening. Now, living on the northern outskirts of Houston, I see the neighborhoods already in decline and I have begun to rethink my plans for bugging-in, except for natural disaster.

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Yeah, I can see how population centers and the proximity to the Mexican border could be alarming. I remember that sequence in A Distant Eden - and how feasible it all seemed. If the grid went down and gas wasn't available, Oregon would be well-served by the pretty difficult to climb pass (over the Siskiyou mountains) on I-5, which may make it difficult for people to get north from California. And there are only a couple of bridges across the Columbia River from the north, if we really wanted to isolate ourselves. Since we have abundant water and farmland in the center of the state and high desert that works well for ranching in the east, plus a coast and many rivers and lakes that are good for fishing, Oregon does seem to be a place where you could make a good life with hard work even if everything went to heck.

 

I just "bought" a freebie on Amazon called Collapse (New America - Book One). http://www.amazon.com/Collapse-New-America-Book-One-ebook/dp/B008HYUFWO/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1366006172&sr=8-2

 

Plot summary from the site: "What would it take for the United States to fall from within? In a not too distant future, America is put to the test. With the American people deep in The Second Great Depression and two of the most powerful hurricanes on record to contend with, the United States is in no condition to deal with hidden terrorists on its soil, maniacal politicians, and the most formidable military threat the world has seen since the Third Reich.

 

"This is the story of three men from three very different walks of life: Howard Beck, the world's richest man, also diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome; Richard Dupree, ex-Navy SEAL turned escaped convict; and Maxwell Harris, a crippled, burned-out chief of police of a small Texas town. At first, they must overcome their own struggles and fight for their survival against impossible odds. In the end, the unlikely trio must band together to save their beloved country from COLLAPSE.

 

"Empires topple. Nations crumble. Civilization is fragile. In 2027, America will fall."

 

It was pretty interesting and a lively read, and I'm looking forward to the next installment. It's not exactly a survival book in that much of the action takes place with people who are relatively well-supplied and capable, but there are definitely some "oh my gosh!" moments that really made it a page-turner.

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After reading some of the informational type books out now, it is very easy to see the possibility of some of the plots in the fiction sector actually happening and possibly much sooner than any of us expect.

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Partsman, if you are looking for informational survival fiction, you've come to the right place. All opinions are just that, our opinions, but some books you will see recommended by multiple folks. Also, please make your own recommendations here as well. This is where I get a lot of ideas for my reading list.

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I just finished Jingling Our Change by Kelli Otting and I found it an interesting read. A lot of tin-foil hat time in here, with mandatory chipping, Citizen Compliance arm of DHS, and peak oil issues, but also has some fascinating characters and scary situations. The story centers on Bloom, a crime survivor and dedicated loner who suffers with debilitating injuries while preparing for an uncertain and rocky future. She is the only real prepper atthe beginning of the story but as the country tiptoes ever closer to becoming a police state, a select few of her friends join in her efforts. The story is set in the backwoods of Missouri, the Ozarks that Jerry D. Young loves so much, and I was amused at how some folks still regarded Bloom, who lived there for 25 years, as an outsider by some.

 

I found the Woods brothers, Carl, Walt and Earl, to be a great study in contrasts, and I am eager to read the next book in the series. For those readers looking for strong female characters, Bloom is the best. I know this book is pricey at $7.99 but I found the story worth it. Not much new in prepping necessarily, but the plot shows just how fast things can get out of hand.

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Hi all, it's been a while. OC, I'm definitely going to check out about Sam Houston. Thank you for mentioning him. The history of Texas is something I've not looked at and I have a knowledge gap that needs to be bridged.

 

I recently published a new short story 'W' and it want me friends here to be able to get it for free. It will be free tonight and tomorrow the 28th.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CJ02XDQ

 

Partsman, most of my reading lately comes from the recommendations or analysis by members here and I've yet to be steered wrong.

 

Terry McDonald.

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I recently published a new short story 'W' and it want me friends here to be able to get it for free. It will be free tonight and tomorrow the 28th.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CJ02XDQ

 

Okay, I immediately downloaded this, then put off reading it for a couple of days because I knew it would be over too soon. And I was right, it was over too soon! I love the short story-ness of this, that we're dropped in the middle of a post-apocalyptic world, in the middle of Wanda's life, and just have to hit the ground running with her. For being so brief, the world seems real and complete, and you really feel you know and understand the key characters, which is what makes this such a pleasure to read. That said, now I want the full novel! LOL I want to know the whole story of how Wanda became W, and for that matter, I want more about all of the secondary characters, especially Baby.

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Well cool. I'm glad you enjoyed it OC. Maybe later I will expand the story into a novel. I have three sequels to complete, one of course is for Gran De Daddy which I promised Texas Bill. I think a sequel to 'W' would be loads of fun. If you find time, I hope you will leave a review at Amazon. I hope you're having spring up there and over there in Oregon.

 

Terry

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It makes sense that you can only work on so many novels at once, but I'm glad this has a chance of making your list! LOL I did post a review on Amazon - thanks for the reminder.

 

Spring has fully sprung here, which is confusing the natives (we're not really used to sun until the day after the Fourth of July), but it's a lot more fun than unrelenting rain! Hope the weather is lovely for you, too.

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