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Texas Bill

Survival Fiction or Learning is Fun!

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OC, I agree the protagonist in Against the Grain had some unresolved issues with Breanne, since he figured out he was in love with her and she probably had feelings for him as well, but I thought they worked it out in an adult manner when they were on their road trip. Not in this life, I think was how he put it. Avoiding Bre was probably one of the reasons he stayed away as often as he did, and then like a moth to the flame he would return. That and his feelings of being a fraud, since he is out doing the looting and killing that others would shun him for if they knew. They have been well insulated in the farm but the world outside has begun to intrude no matter what he does.

 

Tiffany was old news for him and yes, I think he handled that one wrong but from his actions later I doubt he would ever intend to renew that relationship. He summed it up pretty good with how Tiffany and RJ got stale being cooped up for so long. Hopefully we will see how that turns out.

 

Megan is the future for him and I would guess he would begin taking steps in that direction as soon as he returned. I think he was wise to take it slow to renew their relationship given how they were reunited, and he was working hard to make it clear that her residence at the Farm was not owed to him (even though it clearly was). Megan, having been traveling out in the mess, did seem somewhat naive given how bad things were supposed to be.

 

I agree, the author would benefit from an editor but then so would a lot of folks self-publishing today. For me, I enjoyed the way bits and pieces came out about him over time instead of getting it all at once. Also, the proposed prequel may make things more clear if the author gets around to writing it.

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Well, after the release of Episodes 1-7 in the Survivalist by Circumstance series in Book 1, we finally have a new episode out today with Episode 8. The author has promised the episodes will be longer, so a little more time between releases, but they will also be much more action-oriented. Case in point, in this one we have one major character shot in the head and another kidnapped. No, I am not the author but I read the Amazon blurb before downloading this morning. Enjoy!

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I saw a book entitled Desperate Times about an economic collapse and almost ordered it unti lI read more of the intro and decided to pass, even though it was free! The story looked like a hot mess. The Last Day (Book of Jim) by Daniel Fellows is nearly as bad, and I did get it for free today on Kindle and started reading at lunch. This book needs a lot of editing and the format is weird on my Kindle, but the price for this thing is normally $10. Rip off. I'm sorry but this reads like a first draft, not something polished for release to the public. No character development, not a lot of plot and for our purposes, nothing really new survival-wise.

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Read a book called Last Best Hope by T.C. Butts. I actually found the book because I read two vampire novels that I enjoyed, and it turns out the "author" of the stories is actually the protagonist of this book! LOL

 

The premise is that a bunch of people in a rural community in Colorado see invaders from space annihilate Denver. They retreat to a cave in the mountains, pooling resources and trying to figure out how to survive despite a threat from above - and from some of the remaining humans who decide that the end of the world means they should behave like savages. This isn't a typical survival book in that you're not going to learn a lot of great tips for handling TEOTWAWKI, the scenario is particularly far-fetched, and the group of survivors at the core is largely made up of women, children, and a few young men. But the MZB aspect, while a key plot point and a fear of the group, isn't particularly inventive or well fleshed out. And I was not all that satisfied with the epilogue, although it really did make sense in terms of the reality of that world.

 

Overall, the book was good. And I genuinely enjoyed the characters and the way they adapted and responded to the situation. But it was not all of that compelling from a prepping aspect. I'm more hopeful that the author continues with the vampire series than doing a sequel to this one! LOL

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Thanks, Oregonchick. I have been missing your recommendations lately. I will try Last Best Hope. I have run out of anything good to read so I have restarted all the P.S. Power books while waiting for Ancient Kings, due out March 15. This is supposed to tie up the current Tor story arc and is rumored to be in the 200,000 word range, so Dale calls it an epic.

 

One thing I do recommend even though it is a zombie book and not really fitting here, is Trooper Tyree. I just recommend it because it was such a good read. Reminds me of the Alamo, but with a better ending.

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Sadly, I haven't had much of interest to recommend lately. I've been reading a few self-help books from the Science of the Mind/Law of Attraction mode of thought (in particular, The Power of Decision: A Step-By-Step Program to Overcome Indecision and Live Without Failure Forever by Raymond Charles Barker and 21 Days to Master Affirmations by Louise Hay, both of which are rather incredible). I've also read a bunch of Louis L'Amour books and romance novels, and I've run out of interesting things to say about LL's work - yes, he's awesome and his characters are great and they actually do real survival-specific things! - so I haven't had much to actually contribute here. LOL

 

I will check out Trooper Tyree, though. Sounds very, very promising! Almost as promising as a Tor epic - that's exciting! I liked Cellophane quite a lot, by the way. It's always interesting to see what new development may occur with the anti-Infected movement and all of the crazy things that take place in that world.

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I guess I need to check out some of those self-help books myself. I picked up the complete Sackett series as a hardcover set from from my local used book store and I will start them this weekend. I have been re-reading A Simple Darkness and I have picked up some more clues (maybe) about what Dale is going to drop on us in Ancient Kings. As for Trooper Tyree, I could imagine a young Marion Morrison (John Wayne), well in his 30s anyway, playing him in a film version of the book.

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Oooh, I loved the Sackett novels. Jubal is my favorite, but there wasn't one book in the series I didn't thoroughly enjoy. And I will never, ever mess with someone with that last name... just in case. LOL

 

YES about Trooper Tyree/John Wayne. He has that whole big, silent, menacing-but-righteous thing going on. And I think you're on the money with that assessment because the author actually wrote (in the notes at the end of the book) that he thought of a lot of his characters as sort of being the ones you'd find in a good B-Western movie, "only this is B-horror"! Absolutely love that series and so glad you mentioned it; I can't wait to read the next book(s).

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Anybody here read the new Grid Down: Perception of Reality book by Bruce Hemming? I found it entertaining but not as chock full of useful items like the first book. I did find the wood gasifier and water heater ideas to be interesting but beyond my technical level.

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I just finished reading the Deadliest Plague by Brian J. Clarke about a world-wide pandemic wiping out 99% of the population and the struggle by the few survivors to carry on in the aftermath. Not a bad book but the author is really sexist in his attitudes, relegating his female characters into stereotypes.

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I just started a book I picked up on Amazon, Friends of the Family by Joel Baker, about a family trying to survive after a collapse. I just started and the husband and wife are discussing a move from Ohio to Tennessee where the husband's family farm, now vacant, offers a better chance for the future. I have only just started but the story is good so far. Very believable and scary.

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Sounds like a good one Tx Bill but amazon just told the whole dang story on the site and spoiled it for me.

I hope you enjoy and let me know if it's different than the spoiler they posted.

 

Have a great day

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Thanks Texas. I'll check it out. In the middle of reading 'Shelter Humanity Abides. About survival after a nuclear holocaust. So far it's a good read. I'll let you all know if it ends cool.

 

BTW> Thanks for the glowing review on 'Disaster'. Sales are fairly good so far. Am definitely going to write sequel to 'Gran De Daddy'.

 

Terry

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Terry, I will give Shelter a read. I am really looking forward to reading the new Phil and Willa story as well as the sequel to Disaster. I still have nightmares about that book, but it just encourages me to be more careful and continue to keep a low profile. Let me know if you want any free help with proofing. I have been having fun doing this for several independent Amazon authors.

 

t2940, I didn't look too closely at the sample posted by Amazon but Friends of the Family was really good in a low key, realistic sort of way. Well, except for the "Friends" but if you have read much Dean Koontz you will love them. There is some useful herbal information in here as well as general homesteading tidbits but they do not detract from the story.

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I am caught up on Shelter for the moment, and thanks for the recommendation, Terry.

 

BTW, I cannot believe it, but when I checked my Kindle I have more than 40 Jerry D. Young stories there. Some of the content is repetitive but the guy is addictive.

 

I also read a little short story on Kindle by Terri Lively entitled Prepper Fiction and Bug Out Bag Practical Guide. Nothing ground breaking here but if you have a spouse who is still waffling, this is the low impact sort of thing you can feed them to get the idea across. Since it was free, I scooped it up.

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Wally, good to hear from you. I check Jerry's site every so often to see what he has posted but I try to support him by buying from Amazon. I am working on reading Shelter but it has been slow going so far. I think it is because I am only able to read it in small chunks so the flow isn't the best. Not the author's fault but entirely mine.

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Louis L'Amour dealt with day to day survival in many of his westerns that I enjoyed as a kid/young Marine. One of my favorites is Last of the Breed. It's set in the 70s or early 80s about a USAF pilot forced down over siberia and his attempt to escape from prison camp and finally from Russia. It's dated and improbable but the mindset of the main character is a good insight into the mindset required to survive and even thrive in an inhospitable land.

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Absolutely loved Last of the Breed. Yes, it's specific to the Cold War and therefore quite a bit of the stuff is outdated or of a really outmoded mindset, but it also is completely compelling and amazing. It's worth reading just for all of the explanations about dealing with cold in a survival situation, even without the epic plot that went with it.

 

My favorite L'Amour books are still the Sackett saga ones, especially Jubal Sackett, although there are many that are quite wonderful. I liked The Man Called Noon, because the story starts with a hero who has amnesia and isn't sure whether he's a good guy or a bad guy. Great story made more so just because it takes a while to catch on to why someone wants him dead. Flint is pretty great - a guy who left the frontier for civilization, then decides to head back when he finds out he's dying, only to wind up an unlikely hero to a young woman whose ranch is under siege. One that I recently read that had me riveted was Down the Long Hills, which is about a seven-year-old boy who escapes a raid on the wagon train he's in with only the clothes on his back, a three-year-old girl, and a really good horse. He knows his father waits to the west, so he sets off and tries to remember everything he's been taught - while the outlaws that killed the rest of the travelers and an Indian who with an eye for a good horse try to track him down.

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