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Texas Bill

Survival Fiction or Learning is Fun!

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Texas Bill, You do keep everyone up to date on their and your reading. I will have to check the World of the Chernyi-Aftermath series.

 

In case anyone would like to take advantage of a freebie, I have a collection of shorts for free on Friday at Amazon 'ODDITIES' . I think Texas Bill has read them all, but perhaps not 'A Tough Man' which is included in the collection. If you enjoy please do review if you have time.

 

I was reading about a water bottle that purifies hundreds of gallons of water without changing filters. Sounds pretty amazing.

http://www.amazon.com/Lifesaver-Bottle-4000-Ultra-Filtration/dp/B001EHF99A

Have any of you had experience with it. It is expensive, but I think I want one.

Terry

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Thanks, Terry. I really enjoyed "A Tough Man", especially the accent. It kind of reminded me of some stuff I have read by TJ Reeder. I saw Oddities and that is a great omnibus of your shorter works. As for the World of Cheryi- the first three books is this series were really good. The last two weren't bad but it got bogged down over infighting amongst some religious groups.

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Texas Bill: Your list of books is great. I've added every one of them to my reading list. These add'l books should keep me occupied for a while.

 

I've been out of touch 'cause Uncle Sam had me out "practicing" many of my survival skills far, far from home.

 

When I upgraded my Kindle to the Kindle Fire I took my older Kindle Touch and put it into a specially built Faraday Cage. The Kindle Touch has copies all of my fiction, non-fiction, and important papers in PDF format. Although I do have hard-copies of many of my books, there are just too many of them to keep as hard-copy. I pray that I never have to confirm that the Faraday Cage worked. And yes, I also have a way to charge it that is also protected in a separate cage.

 

workquick (Terry): Thoughly enjoyed Tough Man, Annie Higgins and A Bunker Christmas. Look forward to reading Oddities. Look forward to a full length novel (600+ pages) some day.:)

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I've been out of touch 'cause Uncle Sam had me out "practicing" many of my survival skills far, far from home.

 

On behalf of the spoiled stay-at-home types, thank you for being willing to "practice" when and where Uncle Sam calls you.

 

Good idea on the backup Kindle, by the way. I may just do that myself. I have a Kindle 3 for reading without glare, and a Kindle Fire basically because it's much cheaper than an iPad, but it might be worth digging out my old first gen Kindle and stocking it up with all of the books and info that would be useful in a SHTF scenario. I try to buy hard copies of most survival-oriented books, but you're right that the books I have/will acquire will far exceed my capacity to store them on shelves. Plus a Kindle is portable in a BOB, but an entire home library may be a bit difficult to carry around.

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oregonchick: I just checked and I have 287 books of fiction, 114 reference books, and 36 PDF files (titles, CCL, deeds, passports, etc.) on my Kindle Touch. From the looks of it I think I still have enough memory to just about double that amount.

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Wow. That's pretty impressive - especially the reference materials. I have had a Kindle for years, and only store part of my library on my devices, but I know I have upwards of 2,500 books total... many of which wouldn't really be worth making the effort to preserve (post-SHTF, all of those books about vampires and werewolves and even zombies probably won't be useful or in much demand). Looks like an upcoming project for me will be sorting out what books I'd want to archive on a back-up Kindle!

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Capt. Rob, thank you for your service. That is a great idea about adding PDF files to your Kindle with other pieces of information. I just learned how to do that when I downloaded some Jerry D. Young short stories but keeping copies of important documents handy sounds so much more useful.

 

OC, don't be too hasty. One day you might just need to know how to take out a Wallachian bloodhound (I don't know what that is-just made it up), so those werewolf books might come in handy! Seriously, we all need some "comfort" reading materials and that includes books about vampires, werewolves and zombies. Or fluffy kittens and pretty ponies. Whatever floats your boat.

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Read Going Home by A. American this weekend. I liked a lot of it, but was annoyed by the fact that there are a TON of unanswered questions at the end and there's no sequel out yet. LOL

 

That said, it's a great story about a guy who is somewhat prepared for TEOTWAWKI, but finds himself caught about 250 miles from home when an EMP or CME knocks out power (and most cars). With an adequately stocked GHB, he sets out on foot to find out what's going on and make his way - as quickly and safely as possible - to his wife and kids. Along the way, he encounters some good people and some really, really bad people, and a whole lot of sheeple in between. The author walks you through the rationale for everything from what he carries to how he decides where to camp at night, and shows varying kinds of interactions you might wind up having with other survivors if you found yourself in a SHTF situation. I especially appreciate that (for the most part) the characters in this book don't engage in confrontations and then leave armed, angry enemies nearby; in general, they are either totally disarmed and immobilized or flat-out killed. There are several situations where he probably could have chosen to move on without helping but chose to intervene, and other times when he kept to himself and it served him well - but there's a real understanding that part of what happens when there are no rules is that you have to make decisions based on your own conscience and the kind of person you are.

 

Overall, a very good book with a few things that bug me (but are more like nit-picking than serious issues). If you haven't already picked it up, it's worth the read.

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I read Going Home last night and the story is definitely left open for a sequel. I like reading about a protagonist with a conscience who is still willing to do the hard things necessary to get home to his family. And as to his family, I thought the way he had to compartmentalize his thoughts on the road so he didn't dwell too much on his wife and children was a nice touch. Thanks so much to Oregonchick for the recommendation.

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Glad you liked it, Texas Bill! I will admit that I put off reading the book for some time simply because the author's pen name made me roll my eyes, but I was very pleased with the story overall. I agree that many of the protagonist's reactions and decisions struck me as believable, such as being better able to function when he didn't let himself worry too much about what was happening at home and instead focused on the here-and-now. I also like that at times he felt compelled to intervene simply because he was a decent guy (such as with the young mother who was being assaulted early in the book). After all, what's the point of surviving if we lose our humanity?

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If you read Out of Gas by Randy Dyess, he is giving a sneak peek at the first six chapters of his sequel, The Farm, on his website. Just go the author page on Amazon and click on the links on the right side. These first few chapters are sort of a rehash of the ending of Out of Gas but the chapters fill in a lot of blanks and explain the way the Farm is set up as a refuge for not just the current residents but their extended family as well as things get worse in the fuel shortages. Nice descriptions of how the set up off grid power and the need to balance loads as well as centralizing food prep and communal dining to preserve resources.

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I felt like there was a lot of exposition in Out of Gas, like I kept waiting for action and just got more explanation about how tenuous our society is. When the plot moved, it was a great book - and the information was really good. But it felt something like a lecture instead of a story in parts.

 

Just read A Long Winter's Journey by Greg Walker. It was a lot more about coping with mental illness than dealing with an apocalypse, but it was an interesting take on things. A young man with severe depression has been in an asylum for about a decade. The world ends and the only thing the patients notice is that most of the staff is gone and nobody served pudding on Tuesday - and they ALWAYS get pudding on Tuesdays. Forced by dwindling food and medications to go out and search for more, he and another patient (who is suffering from schizophrenia) encounter the after-effects of a flu epidemic that's killed off most people: looting, violence, and desperation. They realize it's past time to take charge of their lives. There's also a whole secondary story line involving the head doctor from their clinic, who is not nearly as benevolent as he led everyone to believe before the world ended, and it was a bit over-the-top for me. But I did enjoy the book and the interesting characters. There aren't a lot of useful survival ideas there, unless your plan is to form your own band of raiders. LOL

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Hey y'all. Had some computer problems and enjoyed catching up on the post here. Just finished a book. Seven Fires by Brian Goodson. It was a pleasant surprise to read. It is a true apocalyptic survival story. If you enjoy native American culture and a well written story this book is for you. The characters are developed. The dialogue realistic and the battle and other conflicts are believable. Let me know if you have read it or if you do read it, let me know what you think.

 

Terry

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Thanks, guys, I will have to get both and check them out. I was aware of A Long Winter's Journey but this is the first mention I have seen of Seven Fires. I just finished Eden's Hammer by Lloyd Tackitt and I found some of the long term implications of a grid down situation interesting, especially when it relates to primers and black powder adaptions. The story itself was farfetched but interesting. I especially enjoyed the "Old Timer's Brigade" of Roman and his buddies (my phrase, not the author's) because it goes to show that old and sly will often beat young and quick.

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Texas Bill, I just finished Eden's Hammer yesterday! Absolutely loved it, but agree that some of it was a little unbelievable. It was interesting to see how the "old guys" who had tactical experience were able to play a big hand in engaging the enemy. And the concerns of the growing community were really worth contemplating, like how quickly everyone would run through shoes if you had to walk everywhere. It also really made me wonder how to advertise for "mad genius gunmaker/inventor/blacksmith/barber" when I finally get around to establishing a prepper community of my own. LOL

 

Just FYI: When I first searched for Seven Fires on Amazon, it brought up a bunch of random books. Here's a link to the Kindle version, which is only $2.99. http://www.amazon.com/Seven-Fires-ebook/dp/B00B2PD716/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1358870752&sr=1-3

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Snake, that looks like an interesting book and it is strange I have never heard of it. I'll need to investigate further.

 

OC, I can cut hair and heat/bend iron but that is about the it for me. I had that book for a while but I rationed out my pages so I didn't read it too fast like I did with Adrian's War. I loved how the other guys just keep giving Roman "guff" about getting lost. That really is the way old friends needle each other and it rang true.

 

Terry, I just downloaded Seven Fires and I am going to get started on it during lunch. I really enjoy some aspects of Native American culture and the survival skills gleaned from thousands of years of trial and error getting by in this environment.

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I still need to read Seven Fires, next up on my Kindle, but i was trying to finish Free Falling by Susan Kiernan-Lewis first. Hard slogging and not just because of the dreary Irish countryside depicted. The story of how these wired-in computer junkies learn to adapt to a post-nuclear contry life trapped in Ireland (these Americans end up stranded there on vacation) is interesting and manges to keep my attention for the first half of the book. Then the author engages in that most painful of literary misdeeds by suddenly having our protagonists come down with a fit of the "stupids". Yes, I think authors who are brave enough to write about characters who make mistakes and who learn from those mistakes should be applauded since nobody likes a know-it-all, but this is rediculous. I don't waht to give any spoilers but has anyone else read this and disagree? Mind you, I am not finished, but after this turn I doubt I will go back to that story.

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Terry, I forgot to ask earlier. Any chance of seeing more of Phil and his family from Gran De Daddy? I loved that story and I would certainly buy more stories about any continuing adventures. I know it would be hard to come up with a plausible reason for Phil to come out of retirement again but well worth the effort.

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