Sign in to follow this  
___

5 Monkeys

Recommended Posts

I found this and thought I would share

Start with a cage containing five monkeys. Inside the cage, hang a banana on a string and place a set of stairs under it. Before long, a monkey will go to the stairs and start to climb towards the banana. As soon as he touches the stairs, spray all of the other monkeys with cold water. After a while, another monkey makes an attempt with the same result - the other monkeys are sprayed with cold water. Pretty soon, when another monkey tries, the other monkeys will try to prevent it.

 

Now, put away the cold water. Remove one monkey from the cage and replace it with a new one. The new monkey sees the banana and goes to climb the stairs. To his horror, the other monkeys attack him. After another attempt, he knows if he touches the stairs he will be assaulted.

 

Next, remove another of the original five monkeys and replace it with a new one. The newcomer goes to the stairs and is attacked. The previous newcomer joins in the punishment with enthusiasm! Then, replace a third monkey with a new one, then a fourth, then the fifth. Every time a newcomer takes to the stairs, he is attacked.

 

 

 

Most of the monkeys beating him have no idea why they were not permitted to climb the stairs or why they are participating in the beating of the newest monkey. After replacing all the original monkeys, none of the remaining monkeys has ever been sprayed with cold water. Still, no monkey ever again approaches the stairs.

 

 

 

Why not?

 

 

 

Because as far as they know that's the way it's always been done around here...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is one extreme of the example. There is the other side to be aware of - namely, I don't know why it is done that way so I feel free to change it. Being a bit of a 'grey beard' at work, I have to constantly remind younger engineers that just because you don't know the reason that something is being done, that doesn't mean you are free to change it. Unless you know why a thing is being done, be very careful about altering it. Part of being a good engineer is to provide the rational for what you've done so the next generation can make informed choices. The Challenger was launched on its last flight because the decision makers 'had no proof that it was dangerous' to fly in temperature below the certified temps. Ignorance may be bliss but it can also be fatal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is one extreme of the example. There is the other side to be aware of - namely, I don't know why it is done that way so I feel free to change it. Being a bit of a 'grey beard' at work, I have to constantly remind younger engineers that just because you don't know the reason that something is being done, that doesn't mean you are free to change it. Unless you know why a thing is being done, be very careful about altering it.

 

In other words, if it ain't broke, DON'T FIX IT!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this