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catfish hunter

Basic minimum kit for a planned day hike

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After reading about more hikers dying of exposure I thought it might be time to bring this up again. Figured if several of us posted our basic day kits we might learn from each other. I'm thinking the kit that goes in the bottom of the daypack for a hunting trip, or in the pocket of cargo pants for a fishing trip, not your all out BOB type kit but just the little bit of insurance you pack along. On my body I always have a knife, wetfire cube, and lighter in addition to the kit.

 

Anyway, here is my basic minimum kit.

Full-time daypack kit (1lb 11oz total weight)

-stainless steel water bottle (empty weight)

-spare wool socks

-Adventure medical heatsheets bivy (the 3.8oz one)

-cheap mylar space blanket (mainly for a fire reflector)

-compass

-bandana (red for signal, pre-filter water etc)

-Mammut S-lite headlamp (1 AA lithium battery, 60hr life, 2oz) (this is part of the kit, and in addition to the bigger headlamp I count as hunting gear)

-Victorionox trekker knife (decent saw, 4" un-serrated blade, tools)

-whistle with thermometer & compass built in

-fire kit: firesteel, lighter, bottle of vaseline coated cotton balls, 4 wetfire cubes, pencil sharpener (making tinder)

-spare small firesteel

-50ft roll 2" duck tape

-small bottle superglue

-frontier water filter straw

-4 tabs potable aqua

-30yds 152lb bank line

-15yds 350lb bank line

-25ft bright yellow paracord

-blank CD (signalling)

-little bag with 12 45lb 18” leader snares & 30ft 25lb fishing line, 20ft 10lb fishing line, 12 hooks, repair/suture needle)

Medical: (stop bleeding, make splints)

-quick clot sponge

-1 roll hot pink vetwrap (bandaging with duck tape, marking trail, etc)

-small tube neosporin

-4 3"x3" gauze pads

-rubber glove

-6 pills immodium

-2 pills claritin

-1 packet sunscreen

-1 packet lip balm

-4 safety pins

-1 antiseptic towlette

 

Additional gear for western or longer hunts (2lbs 5oz total)

-Kifaru paratarp with 10 1/2oz aluminum stakes (18.4oz total)

-50ft bright yellow paracord

(All below, 12.9oz total)

-esbit stove (4 fuel tabs)

-2 oatmeal packets

-6 tea bags

-cut down spork

-1ftx2ft aluminum foil folded down

- Bic lighter

-1 two serving mountain house meal

Robertskemo likes this

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After reading about more hikers dying of exposure I thought it might be time to bring this up again. Figured if several of us posted our basic day kits we might learn from each other. I'm thinking the kit that goes in the bottom of the daypack for a hunting trip, or in the pocket of cargo pants for a fishing trip, not your all out BOB type kit but just the little bit of insurance you pack along. On my body I always have a knife, wetfire cube, and lighter in addition to the kit.

 

Anyway, here is my basic minimum kit.

Full-time daypack kit (1lb 11oz total weight)

-stainless steel water bottle (empty weight)

-spare wool socks

-Adventure medical heatsheets bivy (the 3.8oz one)

-cheap mylar space blanket (mainly for a fire reflector)

-compass

-bandana (red for signal, pre-filter water etc)

-Mammut S-lite headlamp (1 AA lithium battery, 60hr life, 2oz) (this is part of the kit, and in addition to the bigger headlamp I count as hunting gear)

-Victorionox trekker knife (decent saw, 4" un-serrated blade, tools)

-whistle with thermometer & compass built in

-fire kit: firesteel, lighter, bottle of vaseline coated cotton balls, 4 wetfire cubes, pencil sharpener (making tinder)

-spare small firesteel

-50ft roll 2" duck tape

-small bottle superglue

-frontier water filter straw

-4 tabs potable aqua

-30yds 152lb bank line

-15yds 350lb bank line

-25ft bright yellow paracord

-blank CD (signalling)

-little bag with 12 45lb 18” leader snares & 30ft 25lb fishing line, 20ft 10lb fishing line, 12 hooks, repair/suture needle)

Medical: (stop bleeding, make splints)

-quick clot sponge

-1 roll hot pink vetwrap (bandaging with duck tape, marking trail, etc)

-small tube neosporin

-4 3"x3" gauze pads

-rubber glove

-6 pills immodium

-2 pills claritin

-1 packet sunscreen

-1 packet lip balm

-4 safety pins

-1 antiseptic towlette

 

Additional gear for western or longer hunts (2lbs 5oz total)

-Kifaru paratarp with 10 1/2oz aluminum stakes (18.4oz total)

-50ft bright yellow paracord

(All below, 12.9oz total)

-esbit stove (4 fuel tabs)

-2 oatmeal packets

-6 tea bags

-cut down spork

-1ftx2ft aluminum foil folded down

- Bic lighter

-1 two serving mountain house meal

 

Love the pencil sharpener and blank CD ideas. Helpful!

 

I also carry a mini tube of lanolin. It's better than vaseline for chapped skin/lips/nasal irritation, etc.

 

Thanks for your list.

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Id add A tarp. Even just a 6 x 6 one. Can be used for shelter, flooring, water collection, insulation.... Since you already have rope or line in your kit... And tarp is seriously only ounces in your kit....

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Id add A tarp. Even just a 6 x 6 one. Can be used for shelter, flooring, water collection, insulation.... Since you already have rope or line in your kit... And tarp is seriously only ounces in your kit....

 

I agree completely. The Kifaru Paratarp weighs 11oz and is roomy for 1 person and gear in it's full height standard configuration. In a flatter set-up it can cover alot more area. A military poncho is ALOT cheaper and can make an emergency shelter, but the Kifaru weighs the same and is a much more complete shelter.

 

I am skilled in building natural shelters and carry the emergency bivy to crawl in, plus the cheap space blanket that can be used to cover my head or better as a fire reflector in front of a lean-to. The tarp is a great idea and an item that I carry most times, but I sometimes skip it. A tarp or poncho is a damn good idea and item to have though, sometimes I just cut the bulk/weight. I sure check the weather forecast first though and the times I don't take it I'm within walking distance of home where it is close to impossible to get lost. Impossible with a working compass.

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I've actually spent entire days in the woods with nothing but something to drink. It's funny what you don't find a need more if you don't have it. It's fun to plan and stock up for stuff though although yes I do like to seriously be prepared.

 

Back in the 90s, I used to rock an ALICE belt and suspenders with a canteen and pertinent pouches. Then I got self conscious about it, and started using a small backpack, lol. I still use a backpack.

 

I like the Dave Canterbury approach of 5 C's: cover, coradage, combustion, cutting, and container. Something to shelter with or create shelther with. Cordage is obvious. A way to make fire. Something to cut with and preferably a backup. An item to hold water and I mentally add make more water clean and potentially cook/boil in. As a personal confession, it's the cover I'm usually deficient in with my little packs.

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I always ended up leaving the cover out too, I'm a Cantebury fan. I fixed that with the Paratarp, it's an expensive little bugger but it's light enough that I actually take it with me and makes a darn nice dry shelter FAST, which is the best part. When a storm rolls in I can be set up in a hurry, not looking for where to tie ridgelines etc.

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I always ended up leaving the cover out too, I'm a Cantebury fan. I fixed that with the Paratarp, it's an expensive little bugger but it's light enough that I actually take it with me and makes a darn nice dry shelter FAST, which is the best part. When a storm rolls in I can be set up in a hurry, not looking for where to tie ridgelines etc.

 

I have a couple of those flimsy, disposable ponchos still in their packaging. I figure I could put one on the ground and one on the roof. Still, I don't take anything specifically for shelter. I have a mil. poncho under the backseat of the truck in its little pouch. If I had to have it I've got it, but I don't day hike with it. I'll give the Paratarp a look.

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Plastic drop cloths are cheap and easy to pack they come in different mil specs and sizes to fit your need and a few of the tarp clips make them very useful.

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i just recently repurposed a cpl camelpacks just for this, day hikes.

As far as what to include, i cover all my bases for the day (Fire, Water, Food, Med, Shelter, Defense)

and a few things if for some reason i lose my brain and get lost over night.

 

besides... if i were to start a camp fire in the middle of any of the parks around here, it should prompt quick response from a Ranger. These parks arent that big.

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went over to see what all the scuttlebutt was about Kifaru Paratarp well their web site sucks

 

If you can find a company that does pond / tank /toxic /hazardous liners they use HDPE film {high density polyethylene} film

 

you want a long lasting tough tarp get some and make your own can be heat welded and you can do custom configuration or

 

grommets and the size you need as if your tall or more rotund you need a bigger tarp

 

188 bucks or pounds I cannot remember either way they can forget that.

 

As far as day hike NEVER HEARD OF ONE plan on more and if you get back consider your weight training yourself

 

compound fracture to a leg injure an eye {another reason you should always wear polycarbonate eye wear and your in deep crap

 

you need rescue 911 NOW consider a portable radio {look on the radio thread} cell phone and a flare gun with bird bangers

 

and red para flares day hikes have killed many more than the few I see listed here how about the guy that had to cut off his arm

 

climbing in Utah flash floods freak tornadoes widow makers {dead falling branches or trees] back injuries especially on mossy

 

rocks and river beds and how about asps bees snakes spiders scorpions it's a green heaven or hell depends on what you run into.

 

and it is not just all about you others may be in trouble pretty useless to be training and when a situation presents itself

 

your NOT PREPARED AGAIN!

 

and if your going somewhere leave a direct message of where you are starting where your going route if there are more than one

 

with a couple of humans not a recording or voice mail or text or paper note it only takes minutes and if you do not call in someone

 

will know you may need assistance.

 

use your compass have a map tell the ranger park attendant also I have gone to many parks a few were many miles across

 

even the small ones took a day to cover and you still had so make it back {IN THE DARK} streamlight makes a black light pen or uv

 

using canola oil BEST or tonic water in a hand pump sprayer and non toxic and it is visible in the dark so if you need to find your

 

way back and is eco friendly try it first It is an Idea I remember but I am at home at night in the woods {where I am familiar}

 

but I would use something similar or hi viz tape rip it off as you come out do not leave a mess behind you

 

and take azz wipe them leaves are rough on your nose and makes great fire starter.

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Snake I'm not saying the Paratarp is for everyone. The situation I bought it for, I'm starting at 5000ft, hunting at 8000ft and covering 5 miles in gaining that elevation before I start hunting each day. I'm only going to pack the necessary weight for a hunt up there and not any more. Yes it's possible to carry more weight in but I drive 24hrs there with a limited time to take a good bull or buck before I have to be home for work. If packing less weight lets me cover more country then I up my chances. I pack light for a rough overnight camp at that elevation so that if I get on a good animal at dark way back in I can hole up for the night and be right on him in the morning. It works. I'm very glad not to be packing any extra weight once the meat and rack/cape are strapped to my back and I'm making multiple trips out.

 

I've posted many times that I wouldn't have the ultralight gear I do if it was only for prepping. I use it for my hunting, fishing and camping gear in these "normal" times also. Gear doesn't replace knowledge, you have a system that works for you and I've read enough of your posts to have little doubt that you know what works in your area. I read about your plans and find few holes in them. Just don't discount something you haven't tried due to price or prejudice, that 11oz Paratarp I have with me when the storm rolls in is much better than the

2lb canvas one I left behind due to weight. I can pitch mine with 2 sticks, 9 stakes either cut or pre-made, and 10 minutes without needing a ridgeline or anything to tie to. If it doesn't fit a situation buy something else. I've done alot of research though and it offers more coverage and versatility than anything I've found for the weight.

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with the exception of the silenced rifle and the armor, I take the entire BOB, especially if it's in the mountains. I'd much rather have 15 lbs be "unnecessary"  than badly need the 1-2 lbs of stuff that I aint got. I need the exercise and the practice and the experience/use of the gear, anyway.

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I rarely bother with the rifle, but if I'm gonna be more than CRAWLING distance from a dwelling or my vehicle (especially in the mountains) I want the full kit, to include the pocket 9mm, AND a rental satellite phone if it's wintertime.

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