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mojo3174

Communication

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Hi

Me and my dad are looking for ways to communicate should there be an earthquake or any other natural disater. We were looking at walkie talkies and realized that most people say that although they are suppossed to get ex.36 mile range reality is trees and buildings hamper that. We live in a city with lots of trees and building. Any suggesstions as to something reliable that would get around 15 mile range?

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Look at CB and handheld Ham units as the possibility of the mobile phone system being down if equake or major weather event could render texting a nonevent. Talk to people with these types of equipment and find out what their experiences have been. What ever type of equipment you decide on... be sure to test it in the areas you expect to use it. You may find that there are certain hot spots and other areas that are dead to the type of signal your equipment puts out. Remember..knowledge is power.

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Hi

Me and my dad are looking for ways to communicate should there be an earthquake or any other natural disater. We were looking at walkie talkies and realized that most people say that although they are suppossed to get ex.36 mile range reality is trees and buildings hamper that. We live in a city with lots of trees and building. Any suggesstions as to something reliable that would get around 15 mile range?

 

The little FRS "bubble-pack" radios are very good at exaggerating their effectiveness. I've never gotten more than a few blocks with them in town. They are cheap for a reason.

 

CB might be viable if both of you can connect up to a good antenna (directional would be even better). But CB is AM, which is very noisy, and the band is not that great in some areas. You are limited to 40 channels in a single band.

 

Other options might be radios certified for MURS (Multiple Use Radio Service) or GMRS (General Mobile Radio Service). Both have their +'s and -'s.

 

But, in my opinion, if you are going to make that kind of investment ($75-$300) you might as well go the Ham (Amateur Radio) route and be done with it. It does require a license for both parties ($15 dollars and an exam on basics). The equipment is readily available new and used. Hams are a very friendly group and happy to help the newbies. A technician license (the lowest level) will limit your choice of frequencies (upgrading will get you more "privileges").

 

Just Google "Amateur Radio" or go here for more information: http://www.arrl.org/helloradio-org

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