Sign in to follow this  
SigCorps

Looking for a long range hunting rifle

Recommended Posts

After sorting through all the good info in this part of the forums I want to pose a question. I am looking for a long range hunting rifle. Now here come the criteria.

I live in Alaska, where the animals come in large, extra-large and holy crud look at the size of that. So I want something that with maybe, upping the grains on the rounds, will take down pretty much anything. Worst I may have to be concerned with are our large brown bears. Main game would be caribou, elk and moose. For smaller game I already own a G22 rifle. While yes it was bought as a plinking gun to go to the range with my sons, it can still be used for small game, has built in sites and an 8 round clip. So that area is covered. As for a side arm, carrying anything smaller than a .44 in bear country is an invitation to being mauled by a wounded angry bear. But .44 suggestions are for another thread. I do have some hunting experience, and military background so I can shoot and know how to maintain a weapon.

 

Now my father-in-law is in favor of the Ruger scout 308. I like the iron sites idea incase optics become unusable, but the 308 is a tad small for brown bears. I did look at Savage 111s but the one I saw did not have any iron sites. I also looked at a Winchester with sites, but the price tag was prohibitive. I would like to keep it under $800 if possible, under $600 preferable.

I am thinking of something in the 300 win range and prefer iron sites as well as being able to mount optics. Looking for something easy to maintain and light weight comparably. Not adverse to synthetic stocks and such. This is a weapon that would be included in any bug out situations, so it needs to be able to be used for worst case scenarios. As I have heard that 300 win can have a decent kick, upgraded, aftermarket stocks can also be included in any suggestions.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the new gun bans in the pipe-line, and the need for a good hunting caliber. I would agree with your choice of the Ruger scout 308. Its bolt action, so the new bans wouldnt apply to this type of firearm. 308 is very capable. I considered getting one myself shortly before purchasing a Saiga .308. it was either the Saiga or the Scout

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the savage / stevens model 200 in .308 is retailing out at 420 dollars it needs iron sights drilled and tapped for scope base.

 

http://savagearms.com/firearms/models/

 

look through your local sops gun and pawn for deals also wood stocks are notorious for swelling or touching the barrel

 

making accuracy a problem it is easy to fix sad the barrel channell {only} and seal with linseed oil do not touch the edge

 

of the channel you can see on top all you need to remove is enough to slide a dollar bill to the barrel joint with the action.

 

linseed oil needs to dry a few days and do a few coats that way reassemble the rifle and test it some rifles have stock ferrules

 

the bolts go through check on gunparts inc site for a diagram see if they were original parts or not if so get some or make some

 

aluminum arrows cut make good ferules also copper tubing or metal tubing it is there to keep the bolts from moving front to back

 

and side to side.

 

clean and remove all old oil in bolt and trigger group break cleaner does this make sure it is out of stock break cleaner

 

check scope mount screws for fit / tightness if you find them loose use blue loctite NOT RED and refit and tighten

 

allow to dry over night replace scope and check rings too use good quality steel rings they are not that expensive.

 

messes up the stock finish or fiber / plastic stock

 

and clean the barrel with a good bore cleaner like sweets with a bore brush and until it a white patch comes out clean

 

check the crown before you by see if it is dinged.

 

this is all part of regular after shooting maintenance so do not think this is a big deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i like the 300 win.mag. i have a savage wheather warrior and i have never had any problems what so ever. it has an adjustable muzzle brake so it doesn't kick the s--t of ya! it has a fluted bull barrel and detatchable box magazine. if you've got enough ass in your pants you can drive nails with it! LOL!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go with a 338 win mag in your area. The 300 win is a great choice, the 338 just offers a little more versatility in bullet weight for the animals you may encounter. I'd shoot a premium bullet like a Nosler Partition in either, a 200gr in the 300 win or a 225 -250gr in the 338. For most uses I prefer the Nosler accubond especially at long range, but it's bonded core and large mushroom can limit penetration a little. A Partition will shed some of the mushroom ahead of the partition part while the back of the bullet drives on in for deeper penetration. I want that penetration on a bear.

 

I'd go with a Ruger M77 in a stainless all weather model and likely still go with a more stable and lighter weight aftermarket stock like a Mcmillian Hunter's Edge. I like a real stiff stock so that using a bipod or improvised rest on the forend won't allow the stock to contact the free-floated barrel due to pressure. I'd have a 3rd sling swivel installed on the front also and put a Stoney Point rapid pivot bipod adapter on it and then get the sitting/kneeling and prone model bipods. These are a great versatile shooting aid that can aid accuracy in alot of field shooting situations.

 

The reason I'd go with a Ruger is for the built-in scope mounts. I'd have a good variable scope, partial to Leupold VX-3's or Vortex Vipers myself with an elevation turret matched to my load and average conditions. I'd then have a second scope, a compact fixed 4x zeroed for the gun in a second set of rings. I had a problem with my long range scope, I'd still have a tough secondary option I could install with my multi-tool in seconds that would be darn close to zeroed right from the start. If the situation permitted I'd sure try a round to check it though. Iron sights are a great back-up to have also, but I like having the second scope for precision shooting. It's getting hard to find a good stainless bolt gun with iron sights anymore. The plastic fiberoptic sights are nice but not extremely durable. With a Ruger's built-in scope mounts and a second top quality scope I'd feel comfortable without sights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No love for the 30-06??? I recently picked up an 06 in a trade. I've got some 220 grain rounds for it too. I couldn't see why that would work, but then again I'm not very gun savvy. I'd love a Saiga. My 30-06 is a Western Field M78 and I have a Mossberg 100 ATR in .308 also. Both I would think would be good for large game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with a 30-06 at all. It is perfectly adequate for big bears, Phil Shoemaker one of the top brown bear guides is a fan of it with a real good 220 gr bullet. I just like to go right past adequate and into at least mid-range for big game.

 

That said, shot placement is still and will always be more important than how big a gun you use. If the big gun makes you flinch a good shot with a lighter rifle is always better than a poor shot with a heavy one.

 

The magnums with their larger powder capacity will push the heavy bullets considerably faster than a 30-06 can. The increased speed means a flatter trajectory for easier hits at longer range, and more energy put into the target when they hit. They also generate more recoil, there is always a trade off.

 

Higher BC (ballistic coefficient) bullets have a more efficent shape that holds it's trajectory better against the resistance from cutting through the air. Any time you are shooting long range a higher BC is desirable as long as it can be found in a bullet that still has the terminal performance you are looking for when it hits. Some of the highest BC bullets are target bullets designed for accuracy but not quick kills on game.

 

Long story short if all other things are equal, as long as the recoil doesn't affect your shooting the highest BC bullet pushed the fastest is best for long range.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the input folks. I need to see if I can get my hands on a few of these and test fire them. Thankfully my eldest son works at a firing range. I am liking the look of the Ruger. That M77 looks to be a nice upgrade from the American I looked at earlier. The debate on .300 vs .338 would be the next step. I need to test fire those. While I am an experienced shooter I have yet to fire either of those rounds. Not too many M16 or M249s in those calibers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this