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Josh_Survivalcache

Survival Cache Presents: Building Better Bug-Out-Bags

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Yes I do agree with you that you should be using things to better know how to use them and also maintain what is in there but at the same time its nice to be able to flip through a notebook and see that I have ten glowsticks before I go to the store so that I know to get more rather than go through the bad and count them up.

 

Yeah... I do this myself. I keep a mini-composition notebook specifically for the purpose of maintaining an inventory of equipment.

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Have you checked shipping weight for all items? Also, I would have a hatchet to split wood and act as a hammer in camp over the pocket chainsaw. I have a few of the hand operated chainsaws, but something heavy duty is needed with multi use options. I would also get a sleeping pad.. Ground is cold and it will drain the heat right out of you. Most sleeping bags are insulated on top and not between you and the ground so much. Not sure where you live, but getting into the low 30s here now at night. Also, add a magnesium fire block to go with the Gobspark. Get a stainless water bottle even if using the platypus bags. The bags get holes and the bottle will handle rough handling much better. I didn't see a mess kit of any kind either.

Also, get a field guide on edible plants, medical plants, mushrooms, survival guide, animal tracks, etc. I'm not sure if you're hiking in, but make it a learning experience.

 

*Edit* Posted in reply to Sir_Vive's post that is now MIA*

Edited by Regulator5

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Have you checked shipping weight for all items? Also, I would have a hatchet to split wood and act as a hammer in camp over the pocket chainsaw. I have a few of the hand operated chainsaws, but something heavy duty is needed with multi use options. I would also get a sleeping pad.. Ground is cold and it will drain the heat right out of you. Most sleeping bags are insulated on top and not between you and the ground so much. Not sure where you live, but getting into the low 30s here now at night. Also, add a magnesium fire block to go with the Gobspark. Get a stainless water bottle even if using the platypus bags. The bags get holes and the bottle will handle rough handling much better. I didn't see a mess kit of any kind either.

Also, get a field guide on edible plants, medical plants, mushrooms, survival guide, animal tracks, etc. I'm not sure if you're hiking in, but make it a learning experience.

 

Excellent post, you said all the things I was thinking. I to like the axe over the saw and prefer a Wetterlings or GB with a 19" handle for a mix of weight and utility. It will handle a comfortable one or two handed grip for better force and control. I like the 32oz stainless water bottle & 25oz nesting pot from the Pathfinder store, as well as their waterproof edible plants guide. I also pack a little Esbit stove and fuel tabs for times when a bigger fire is unwise or to quickly brew a warm drink if I get to cold. A little aluminum foil can double as a windscreen for the stove, lid for the cup, or to cook wild edibles or game.

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hi all

in the nam era,we were rations K C ...now you have mre's.the liver has the job of cleaning the toxins we eat.i never noticed vets having liver problems from the nam days.but there seems to be a very high percentage of vets with this problem from the recent encounters.as far as fda puppets,check out how many are receiving consulting pay after they retire.i wish i could make that much.and its from the people they are keeping a eye on.wink wink i was told if you have a label to read , it's bad.thats why i tind to stick with nature items.check with indian foods,dehydraded fruits ,vegies,chia seeds.lite weight very good.

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Great post Josh! As you said about research:

 

The process of building a Bug Out Bag can be divided into five easy steps.

 

1) Determine what you want your BOB to do for you.

2) Research.

3) Select your gear.

4) Testing and Evaluation.

5) Adjust the setup

 

A good place to start is www.mybugoutbag.com

 

I am going to build my first Bug out Bag once I arrive in the US.

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