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Lemonmint

My intro...

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I posted in the intro thread but here's a little bit more. We're a family of 5. Three kids between 10 and 16 and two dogs. We've gone camping for a week at a time without amenities but we're far from survivalists. I'd rather be reading a book with a cup of hot tea than roughing it :o My husband is quite opposite from me. He's a machinist and all-around handyman.

 

I've gotten overwhelmed with all the prepping posts and what we might be in for in the future. It's a little too much to handle right now so I'm just focusing on the known emergencies we have had.

 

We're going to start small. We live in the country in a town of about 25,000 surrounded orchards and vineyards and towns the same size or smaller. The biggest city is a little over 500,000 and about 25 miles away. We're about 45 min. to the foothills.

 

Natural disasters are possible earthquakes (but the USGS database shows that there is a about a 60% chance of a major earthquake within 50 miles within the next 50 years. Largest earthquake within 50 miles was a 6.5 Magnitude in 1983). We have hot summers (can get to 115) and mild winters (some freezing).

 

Man-made disasters: If there was a blackout or food supply was cut for more than three days we would have to deal with gangs as they are in all the surrounding cities. Not as bad as LA but it is here. We have a large agricultural migrant population.

 

We have family in the foothills and the mountains. They both have some land (less than 2 acres). Both are pretty self-sufficient with a lot of common sense and hard work ethic. They know how to make a little go a long way.

 

That's just a little background info.

 

The most immediate emergency I can think of is getting stuck in traffic/storm/fog while coming home from work. I work 35 miles from home and drive on the highway with little towns interspersed to a city of about 60,000. My husband works 25 miles away in the industrial area of a city a little over 500,000.

 

I am putting together a car emergency bag now from what we have around the house and will make a list of what we need. I've gotten lots of info from these forums and will post a list when it's together.

 

Our second most immediate emergency is when the power goes off. It happens quite a bit but never for more than 6 hours. I'm planning on a 3 day supply for now, just in case.

 

After that we will do a 2 week supply and keep adding to it. If it becomes a doomsday scenario then we wouldn't want to stay here and trying to lug around all our stuff would be futile.

 

We have a backpack for everybody. We're going to set them up for a 3 day supply.

 

We have firearms for protection but I never paid attention to what they are :P He's in charge of that.

 

We plan on keeping our vehicles at least half-full at all times.

 

We are on a limited budget so we'll be using what we have and upgrading items as we can afford to.

 

We're going to be increasing our knowledge basics of food, shelter, etc... Doesn't do us much good to have stuff if we can't utilize it.

 

It might be short-sighted to not go all out in planning for doomsday but if I thought about it too hard right now (I saw The Road, Book of Eli) I would probably hyper-ventilate and be a useless mess :rolleyes:

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just take one day at a time lemonmint DON'T let it overwhelm you just go back to the list i made and pick one category and start there. dont try to prep for everything all at once or you'll burnout. i prep'd at 20$ a month for seven years and its added up so you can go small if you want...

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Welcome tyo the forum's Lemonmint..

A plan that is small and steady is a plan worth doing..

 

SKILL's ...you have the oppertunity to find out who in the family can do what,and what they enjoy doing..

Map reading/medical/communcation's/scout/cook/herb gatherer(wild food)/traping ...on and on.LOL

OK so you have a full Squad! So take advantage of it.Spreading around responsibility's is a good thing...Keep's everyone focused on what they can do for the UNIT..

AND have Fun doing it..

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Welcome tyo the forum's Lemonmint..

A plan that is small and steady is a plan worth doing..

 

SKILL's ...you have the oppertunity to find out who in the family can do what,and what they enjoy doing..

Map reading/medical/communcation's/scout/cook/herb gatherer(wild food)/traping ...on and on.LOL

OK so you have a full Squad! So take advantage of it.Spreading around responsibility's is a good thing...Keep's everyone focused on what they can do for the UNIT..

AND have Fun doing it..

 

We'll be learning/practicing our skills, some in the yard and some on actual camping trips/hikes in the spring. It will be fun to see what skills everybody excels at.

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Lemonmint,

Thanks for the new information. It is new preppers that keep me on the forum. You don't seem to know it but you've been a prepper for a while now. If you have camp gear for a week out in the tall and uncut, then you have the basic gear required to survive a great many SHTF events. Food and water are needed of course. I like rules of three - 3 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 9 months (3 times 3 months) etc.

 

As to the firearms, please rethink your "leave it to the husband" philosophy. Two main reasons for that - since you both travel, he may not be there when the need arises for firearm use. Secondly, he NEEDS someone to watch his back. I broke up an assault on a young lady in my front yard - an old guy doesn't intimidate an 18 year old punk but an old guy with a Colt does a decent job of getting their attention - when I turned back toward the house, my bride was there with her auto, crimson trace on, covering my back. It felt good.

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Welcome, Lemonmint!

 

Tough to add to the above, but let me encourage you to join right in with us here. All of us are newbies in a lot of things, and I wish I had a nickel for everything new I have learned in this forum. Hopefully I have reciprocated and contributed some small things in the process.

 

Good luck in your prepping and God Bless.

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Lemonmint,

Thanks for the new information. It is new preppers that keep me on the forum. You don't seem to know it but you've been a prepper for a while now. If you have camp gear for a week out in the tall and uncut, then you have the basic gear required to survive a great many SHTF events. Food and water are needed of course. I like rules of three - 3 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 9 months (3 times 3 months) etc.

 

As to the firearms, please rethink your "leave it to the husband" philosophy. Two main reasons for that - since you both travel, he may not be there when the need arises for firearm use. Secondly, he NEEDS someone to watch his back. I broke up an assault on a young lady in my front yard - an old guy doesn't intimidate an 18 year old punk but an old guy with a Colt does a decent job of getting their attention - when I turned back toward the house, my bride was there with her auto, crimson trace on, covering my back. It felt good.

 

the capt. is dead on with this one! you should get more involved with the weapons! and when you and your husband feel comfortable include your kids also. it's also nice that you have folks living in the country! that could really come in handy! like everyone has said, take it slow and steady and have fun, if you constantly worry and fret about it you'll surely burn out! there's a lot of good folks here and a lot to learn, i know i do everytime i log on, so just have fun with it!

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I've taken your advice and familiarized myself with the firearms we have. I can use one comfortably, the others are too hard physically. I'm not very strong.

 

If only ammo was easier to find I could practice more!

 

A lot of weapons drill does not require (if fact is better done without) ammo. Use something like "snap caps"

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=snap+caps&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=4093307875&hvpos=1t1&hvexid=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=14549795001725152121&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=e&ref=pd_sl_28gyv3gsda_e

 

in place of real ammo. Make sure there is NO ammo in the room with you and then load your weapon with the snap caps and practice. This is a critical step - you are going to be pulling the trigger on a lead launcher so you MUST be absolutely certain that there are NO rounds anywhere even close to the weapon. After you've made sure of that, check it all again; I'm paranoid about blowing away my bride's mirror so I check, double check and then make sure before I go forward. May be extreme but then, I've never had a negligent discharge and I want to keep it that way.

 

Ladies often have problems with compact autos due to grip strength required to manipulate the slide. Practice drawing, firing (I face a mirror so I can see where the muzzle is pointing), clearing, etc. over and over again with the snap caps.

 

When you can repeatedly clear and reload your weapon, quickly and accurately, without EVER letting a part of your anatomy get in front of the muzzle, then you are reasonably proficient with what the military called the 'manual of arms'. It is almost more important than shooting practice. Properly executing a clearing drill means you are not going to accidentally shoot yourself or someone else. It gives you confidence in your ability to handle your weapon, increases strength and skill levels and makes you a better shootist.

 

Yes, hitting your target with the fight stopping shot is the ultimate, primary, in truth only, goal of weapons use when 'in extremis' but accomplishing that and then shooting yourself while trying to return your weapon to its holster is really a poor option. That you are gaining skill and comfort level is a good thing and I applaud you for that. I merely offer for your consideration the suggestion that you can do much training and practice without ever sending a slug down range.

 

Just my not so humble opinion of course.

Edited by Capt Bart

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