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hack3rman

Emergency heating

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Hello all. Im new here. New to prepping but very convinced it is necessary. I live the suburbs of NYC. After Hurricane Sandy, I realized being without power and/or gas for an extended period of time is a reality. I have a generator but I never thought I would not be able to get gas for it. My father has a generator that runs off natural gas from Con Edison which never went down so he was fine but the whole situation made me want to be prepared to have to live off the grid for more than just a few days.

 

Being new to prepping, with no bug-out location, I think setting a realistic goal for myself of first being able to bug-in for 1 month. After I have enough bug in supplies and the know how to do that, I will continue my prep adventure to perhaps obtain a bug out location, extended supplies and the "live off the land" know how.

 

My question is... Assuming I have food, water, security and a way to get rid of waste, how would I heat my house to survive off the grid? I was thinking of installing a natural gas generator but what if that went down? If disaster strikes in June or July, I would be fine. If it hits in January, Im screwed. I have a pellet stove but it needs electric to ignite and blow. I do not have a fireplace. I was thinking of installing a wood burning stove or research propane heat or generator with at least a 1 month supply.

 

Any heating ideas would be helpful.. Thanks.

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wood burning stove is a great idea and something you can enjoy w/o being in a situation too.

i would look into that. for emergency you wont need to heat the whole house, but maybe a room or two.

just enough to keep the family safe and sound.

welcome to the forums. if you get an opportunity, meet sherrie. shes brand new to this too and has made

big steps in her prepping in a short time. also, get you a few books to give you ideas and other examples.

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HI and a big welcome!!! I am new too. Please dont get overwhelmed. This is an incredibly stimulating and helpful site. I am in Canada and found a site that tries to do this but I find alot of people here have SO much experience. They have walked the talk and if they haven't they have ALOT of common sense and dont mind answering the questions.

I work daily at trying to get educated on this subject. THere is so much to learn try at the very least to come here and read a couple posts.

If I can ever help you I will but frankly I dont know alot. LOL

HEY! Awareness is the first step

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Welcome hack. I would suggest a visit to Paladin Press and check out their books on survival. There is a forum on multimedia (books and such) that also have many references and links posted. For some good info on Urban scenarios, Ragnar Benson offers some good books and he covers alot of survival topics.

Brett Markum has a book titled "Self Sufficiency on 1/4 acre" that may also offer some good info for you.

 

As for Herbal books, "The Little Herb Encyclopedia" and "Medicinal Wild Plants" by Bradford Anguirre (spelling) are 2 I truly like.

 

Feel free to ask any questions you may have and again, welcome to our community and family.

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How cold does it get there?

 

Tonight it is going down to 28F but in January and Feb it could be 10 degrees F. I have 2 kids. 7 and 5 years old. I would think I would need heat. Especially if it were for a month. I am looking into MRE's and sternos for food.

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there are several options I always recommend multiple Propane is a good one as long as you have a sufficient heater and enough propane in addition I have two hunter artic stoves in the house and two in my bugout supplies the nice thing about them is they are true multi fuel Stoves and in their arctic setting Below -25F they throw out 40,000 BTU each using Kerosene 50,000 BTU using off road desiel but they will also burn Jet A, JP4, JP8, coal, Wood and Charcoal for more info see

www.survivalcache.com/forums/showthread.php?1507-Arctic-Stove and www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZPRg_zQMVw

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If your home is damaged a use a wood stove in a small room that is in good shape and closed to the weather you need stove pipe a couple of elbows

 

a weather cap dry fit to make sure everything you got fits you have to go up one joint an elbow another joint go past the rafters and elbow and up at least a couple of joints to get a draft put a brick on the fascia board to keep the heat off it bricks usually have holes use a few dry wall screws to hang it

and a piece of flat metal strap to keep the pipe from being blown over. air to draw from the stove to outside then a weather cap to prevent rain and snow from leaking back some 1/4 inch hardware cloth inside the cap acts as a spark arrestor so you do not burn other peoples homes with sparks from your stove. you need metal shears

a screw driver with proper tips and self tapping screws or I use sheet metal stud screws you will also need a hand saw and bow saw and a optional

chain saw

You will want to back the stove { it needs to be a foot away from the wall with stacked blocks or bricks between to keep radiant heat from starting a fire on the wall

and a way to knock a hole in the wall make sure it is larger than the stove pipe use brick and mud to fill the hole it will also act like an insulator to keep the heat from your stove pipe from starting a fire in / from your wall.

 

i would not worry your home if it is damaged then go to the damaged part use any furniture and lumber limbs leaves paper books whatever

 

do not worry about all the crap of what to burn this is an emergency as long as it does not smell too bad in the room who cares

 

you can use the top to cook on boil water you can make a still from a old pressure cooker and make fresh water from salt water.

 

got pics of my stove I put it in my greenhouse on the gardening post.

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Warrior I will have to get me one of those artic multi fuel heaters I have seen them but didn't understand just how awesome they were......I picked up a old kerosene wick heater at goodwill a few months ago and put it in my bsmt for a "rainy day" I know that they are a little dangerous but it was only $25 and in really great shape still have not found a example on line of it, it is pretty old little pot belly type remember the old guys using them when I was a kid, and they were considered dangerous back then!

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Welcome, Hack. You have made the biggest prep already; an awareness that just because you live in a big city you are NOT immune from Mother Nature - she is NOT your friend!

A real problem for folks in cold country is that your houses are seal reasonably well sealed. The reason Radon gas is a problem up north and not so much down south is that our homes leak air like a sieve while yours are fairly tight. In a grid down ice storm (it has happen to NYC before. In 1888 people froze to death trying to get home and you had a big storm last year IIRC.

http://www.nesec.org/hazards/winter_storms.cfm

So, to the problems; while you don't have to heat the entire house (even a tent set up in one room helps, perhaps enough to survive without any extra heat) you have to remember that anything except an electrical heater puts out Carbon Dioxide and the much more lethal Carbon Monoxide. Either will kill you but CO2 only displaces the needed oxygen while CO is actually a poison. That fact demands that you consider ventilation when doing heating inside. I'm not sure how close your nearest neighbor is but if you're running a generator, folks will know it. There are propane powered generators that will run a month on a large, trolly mounted cylinder.

If you don't heat your entire house you do run the risk of interior pipes breaking. When the thaw comes that would be very messy so you have to consider how you will deal with that as well. If you can store wood, a wood stove of the Franklin Stove type is a solution that worked very well in some very cold places throughout the 1800s and still serve today.

In many ways, cold is a worse enemy than heat. Careful consideration of what you HAVE to have to survive is important. Just always consider the hidden enemies in most heating solutions. Carbon Monoxide has killed more than a few folks.

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I'm not sure about the newer models, but the old blower motors on the furnace were 24VDC. I remember Dad rigging car batteries up to power the blower on a gas furnace when we lost power during the blizzard of 1978. It was either "on or off" but we had heat. This was a temp fix for just a couple days and definitely want the Deep Cycle RV/Marine batteries if planning for it.

 

It's a possible option if the new models still use 24V and you have a natural gas or propane furnace. I'm sure a heating/AC tech could help with that and possibly on a hook up plan.

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I like wood heat because you can use paper coal charcoal even clothing and leaves break up the furniture

and it is vented it is not perfect but propane runs out and if it does it at the wrong time your going to suffer.

 

I have a propane stove and gas ports to attach heaters in the house I also have portable propane bottles & radiant heater

and a wood heater, and electric ceramic heaters in a few sizes I buy them at garage sales because in a few seasons they

go out I can also use my generator to run these but it is not reasonable as it costs a lot for fuel.

but if I have to I can.

and yes carbon monoxide is a danger for propane and natural gas but many do not know that any burning substance

robs the oxygen out of the room some years ago a family in their truck used a bar-b-q pit with charcoal to heat the bed camper

they were in all were found dead that is why I stress the wood heater it is vented.

you can install and dry fit it take it down and store it leaving the trough wall plate plugged until you need it if it is fitted already

it takes little time to install.

Remember wood heaters are predicated on the same BTU {a heat rating of how much it can heat or cool} as any other

so depending on the size of your room your going to heat it needs to be the proper size too big you can make a smaller fire

too little you will look like ticks stuck to a dog trying to stay warm, your damper helps to retain heat and helps to draft the smoke out at a equalized rate and slow burn of the fire so as not to waste heat out the flu pipe.

you can cook on it you can heat water to moisturize the air and make hot drinks and even heat water to bathe.

 

other heat appliances wont do this they are too small or use liquid or gas fuel that runs out and leave you with

no alternatives and no heat.

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There are also fans for moving the heat around that do not use any energy except the caputered energy from the rising heat. As the heat rises, the fans start to turn and blow the heat into the room. They can be found on the LEHMANS website. Alot of Amish items there as well.

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Just a word of Caution on the H-45 stoves they like to flash over and pulse burn when starting or running out of fuel and it has burned a lot of soldiers and tents who forgot this fact so as soon as you get it lit close the cover and do not open it till it goes out!!! otherwise a good warm stove remember also it is limited to liquid fuels. Unlike it brother the Hunter Arctic Stove.

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Tonight it is going down to 28F but in January and Feb it could be 10 degrees F. I have 2 kids. 7 and 5 years old. I would think I would need heat. Especially if it were for a month. I am looking into MRE's and sternos for food.

 

Hey I know I am a bit late to jump in on this topic but here I am now. I would advise against sterno. If it is used in summer it will work fine, but I went "Camping" (survival class at my local college) back in november. The highest it got while I was out in the boonies was about 12 degrees. Indoors the sterno will probably work fine, but for a bug out situation I would advise to either pass on the sterno or bring an extra cooking source. In the wind and the cold sterno loses its effect very rapidly. Even without the wind it was too cold for the sterno to get the water in my pot to boil.

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There are also fans for moving the heat around that do not use any energy except the caputered energy from the rising heat. As the heat rises, the fans start to turn and blow the heat into the room. They can be found on the LEHMANS website. Alot of Amish items there as well.

 

at 300 bucks i will just wave a old news paper at the stove LOL

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