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2011 Bug Out Bag (BOB) Competition

How Does This BOB Stack Up?  

54 members have voted

  1. 1. How Does This BOB Stack Up?

    • Quality of images
      12
    • Explanation of contents and use
      8
    • Organization and weight
      9
    • Practicality of overall Bag contents
      11
    • Creativity
      7
    • This is the best BOB entry of the group!
      7


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So this is a contest to see who has the best all around bug out bag contents. Feel free to post your contents along with pictures and explanations of the reasons and uses (applications) of each of the items you have in your bug-out-bag.

 

This thread will be devoted to initial entries which will be accepted until December 15, 2011 at that time we will pick 3-10 finalists (depends on me figuring out the functionality of this vBulletin software) and then members will be able to vote on the finalists.

 

Forum members will be able to vote based on the following criteria

 

1. Quality of images

2. Explanation of contents and use

3. Organization and weight

4. Practicality of overall Bag contents

5. Creativity

 

The winner will receive $300 gift certificate/coupon code to be used at www.forgesurvivalsupply.com with second and third place receiving coupon codes for $150 and $75 respectively.

 

The goal of this contest is to share information and survival reasoning with other readers to help us all better prepare for any situation we may meet.

 

 

Thank you!

 

The SurvivalCache Team

 

 

How to Enter:

 

Step 1:

 

Register for the forums here:

 

http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/register.php

 

Step 2:

 

Reply to this thread with your own message. You can upload your pictures or link to them and enter the list and explanations of usage via text. You can also embed video.

 

UBBC Guide here:

 

http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/showthread.php?58-UBBC-Guide

Edited by SurvivalCache

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I would say that the bag is the focus however if a more complete picture can be explained by what you are carrying (complete kit) on your body + bag and configuration then it probably wouldn't hurt to include that as well.

Edited by SurvivalCache

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Post your questions here. We'll attempt to answer them as quickly as possible.

 

Thanks!

 

The Survival Cache Team.

 

Info for contest:

 

How to Enter:

 

Step 1:

 

Register for the forums here:

 

http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/register.php

 

Step 2:

 

Post an entry under this thread:

 

http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/showthread.php?408-Bug-Out-Bag-(BOB)-Competition-Initial-Entries

 

You can upload your pictures or link to them and enter the list and explanations of usage via text. You can also embed video.

 

UBBC Guide here:

 

http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/...?58-UBBC-Guide

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Hello - Here is my Bug out Bag.

post-1311-13851497626715_thumb.jpg

It is specifically designed to use here in Southern California for Earthquake or Civil Unrest. I work in the Film Industry and we operate within the 30 mile zone which is a 30 mile radius from the center of Hollywood. I live on the NorthWest edge of the zone so at any given time I may have to hump 60 miles to get home. This could take 72 hours, so my bag is designed to be a 72 hour bag. It is equipped with a Platypus Big Zip Hydration bladder in the bag and my Gerber multiplier attached to the waistband. Next to the bag in the trunk of my car are my trustee Filson Boots with a pair of socks stuffer inside as well as a spare pair inside my bag.

 

In my bag I have the following items:

post-1311-13851497627121_thumb.jpg

My Smith & Wesson M&P .45 ACP, Two mags, Holster, boonie hat and 50 rounds of ammo.

post-1311-13851497627571_thumb.jpg

Large Mouth Nalgene water bottle (old school style), Bandanna, Cold Steel Kukri Knife. Zip lock baggie with home made penny can stove, Magnesium fire starter, two 9 volt batteries, Potable Aqua iodine tabs, a couple spare zip lock baggies. I also carry a 9 volt LED light and 12" of 2" velcro. I have three dust masks and my SOL Bivy.

post-1311-13851497628036_thumb.jpg

At the top left you can see my Flask of Jack Daniels ;-), next to it is my bottle of HEET which is fuel for the stove, in the stuff sack is my poncho which I've used as a tarp tent while hiking, my cup, with emergency water (In addition I carry a case in my car which I rotate regularly), four dehydrated camping meals, a 2400 calorie survival bar, a Adventure Med Kit Ultralight .9 which has been stuffed with extras including current meds and a suture/IV kit. Under the med kit is 100' of Mason Line, On the top right is my emergency trauma kit with items like Ascherton Chest Seal, Decompression Needle, Gloves, Israeli Bandage, Tourniquet, Scissors, skin glue, Cellox and some other goodies.

post-1311-13851497628412_thumb.jpg

On the top left are my Frog Tog rain/wind pants, next to them is my fleece lined rain/wind jacket. I also carry a spare pair of spectacles, two spare lithium CR-123's for my tactical flashlight, a compass, small note pad with pen and sharpie.

 

In addition to these items I have the following in my EDC (Everyday Carry Bag) Which is a Maxpedition Slingback Series.

 

Inside I carry my Surefire Defender Tactical flashlight, Kenwood TH-F6 HAM radio, ZT Folder, LED 9 volt flashlight, Shemagh, small bottle of hand sanitizer (both for hygiene and firestarter), pocket lock pic set and 550 cord bracelet.

 

You can only attach 5 pics per post so if you'd like to see my EDC with the additional items I can thread to a second post!

G

Edited by ZombieKillTeam

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Hello - Here is my Bug out Bag.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113[/ATTACH]

It is specifically designed to use here in Southern California for Earthquake or Civil Unrest. I work in the Film Industry and we operate within the 30 mile zone which is a 30 mile radius from the center of Hollywood. I live on the NorthWest edge of the zone so at any given time I may have to hump 60 miles to get home. This could take 72 hours, so my bag is designed to be a 72 hour bag. It is equipped with a Platypus Big Zip Hydration bladder in the bag and my Gerber multiplier attached to the waistband. Next to the bag in the trunk of my car are my trustee Filson Boots with a pair of socks stuffer inside as well as a spare pair inside my bag.

 

In my bag I have the following items:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]114[/ATTACH]

My Smith & Wesson M&P .45 ACP, Two mags, Holster, boonie hat and 50 rounds of ammo.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]115[/ATTACH]

Large Mouth Nalgene water bottle (old school style), Bandanna, Cold Steel Kukri Knife. Zip lock baggie with home made penny can stove, Magnesium fire starter, two 9 volt batteries, Potable Aqua iodine tabs, a couple spare zip lock baggies. I also carry a 9 volt LED light and 12" of 2" velcro. I have three dust masks and my SOL Bivy.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]116[/ATTACH]

At the top left you can see my Flask of Jack Daniels ;-), next to it is my bottle of HEET which is fuel for the stove, in the stuff sack is my poncho which I've used as a tarp tent while hiking, my cup, with emergency water (In addition I carry a case in my car which I rotate regularly), four dehydrated camping meals, a 2400 calorie survival bar, a Adventure Med Kit Ultralight .9 which has been stuffed with extras including current meds and a suture/IV kit. Under the med kit is 100' of Mason Line, On the top right is my emergency trauma kit with items like Ascherton Chest Seal, Decompression Needle, Gloves, Israeli Bandage, Tourniquet, Scissors, skin glue, Cellox and some other goodies.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]117[/ATTACH]

On the top left are my Frog Tog rain/wind pants, next to them is my fleece lined rain/wind jacket. I also carry a spare pair of spectacles, two spare lithium CR-123's for my tactical flashlight, a compass, small note pad with pen and sharpie.

 

In addition to these items I have the following in my EDC (Everyday Carry Bag) Which is a Maxpedition Slingback Series.

 

Inside I carry my Surefire Defender Tactical flashlight, Kenwood TH-F6 HAM radio, ZT Folder, LED 9 volt flashlight, Shemagh, small bottle of hand sanitizer (both for hygiene and firestarter), pocket lock pic set and 550 cord bracelet.

 

You can only attach 5 pics per post so if you'd like to see my EDC with the additional items I can thread to a second post!

G

post-1311-13851497692304_thumb.jpg

post-1311-1385149769272_thumb.jpg

post-1311-13851497693172_thumb.jpg

post-1311-13851497693656_thumb.jpg

post-1311-13851497694051_thumb.jpg

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I figured I'd go ahead and upload the pic of my EDC bag and it's contents:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]119[/ATTACH]

HAM Radio, Hand Sanitizer, Shemagh, Surefire Defender LED flashlight, spare 9 volt LED light, ZT Folder, pocket lock pick set, 550 survival bracelet with shackle.

Thanks,

G

post-1311-13851497694467_thumb.jpg

post-1311-13851497694751_thumb.jpg

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Are you planning on more contests like these? Even without the prizes and such. Basically i'm asking because i'm too young to afford what i would like to have in my BOB. Right now i don't have much just basic stuff like a good knife, rope, medical supplies, water storage, a fire arm, military sleeping bag, etc, and as much knowledge as I can get my hands on. And thanks to that free topo site i have a topographic map of my area in addition to other maps.

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Here’s my bag and contents. First let me say, this isn’t really a BOB. I have a wife with medical issues and 4 young children. I don’t have a bug out bag, I have a large SUV with a roof rack. This is my Get Home Bag. I work 25 miles from our home, near Washington DC. If something happens during the 10+ hours a day when I’m out, I need to be home 20 minutes ago. If the roads are open I’ll just drive. If not, I have this bag.

 

post-1319-13851497629477_thumb.jpg

First the bag. I chose this bag for 3 reasons. I had it on hand already from a conference. Unlike most free swag, it’s very well made. Second, it’s the right size. I need something to sustain me for 3 – 12 hours depending on how far I can make it in the car. I need something that helps me get home faster, not something that slows me down. On a bus, hitching a ride, on a bike, or on foot, this bag is small enough to not get in the way or slow me down. Finally, this thing just blends in. It fits in an urban environment and does not draw attention to itself or me. SHTF or TEOTWAWKI, attention = hassle = delay.

 

post-1319-1385149762975_thumb.jpg

I expect to be using this bag from work. Office drone clothing is not SHTF friendly so I’ve got a nylon wind breaker in there to keep me dry and add a little warmth. My shoes should be OK but a dry pair of socks can do wonders. The colorful fabric is a sarong I picked up a few years back. It can do most of what a bandana can do plus function as a towel or provide some warmth. If needed, it can be cut down into 6 – 8 bandana sized pieces. The bright colors allow it to function as a signal cloth as well. The trash bags can act as rain shields or an awning if needed, but mostly I plan on using them to give me somewhere dry to sit and rest as needed.

 

post-1319-13851497630055_thumb.jpg

Tool wise, here’s what I’ve got. Goggles and masks incase of smoke/ash/dust, or something nasty like bio/chem/nuclear. The latter being a real possibility around DC, I considered upgrading to an actual gas mask, but have currently opted for the cheaper, less conspicuous option. Duct tape, wire, and wire hanger for many possible uses, along with a small knife and compass. Some Velcro I had in the office was also small enough to be included for possible use stowing a jacket or something on the pack. I opted for a more expensive headlamp as traveling in the dark is likely. I have spare batteries for it and a slip of paper between the battery and contact to keep if from accidentally turning on. The survival whistle is mostly in there for the thermometer on it, although it does serve as a back up compass as well. SHTF always involves downed trees around here. That’s the most likely thing to keep me from being able to drive home. Since it’s not practical for me to keep my chainsaw in the trunk I packed a small saw. If needed I may be able to saw/break my way through an obstruction and not have to abandon the car. I’m hoping to upgrade this to a Saber Cut saw at some point. And finally the work gloves and wrecking bar. Warmth and physical protection make the gloves a must. The ability of the bar to provide egress or ingress to damaged buildings or cars and the fact that it’s a big, black, intimidating piece of steel in a gun unfriendly state makes it worth the extra weight.

 

post-1319-13851497630365_thumb.jpg

A large ziplock bag provides dry storage. I’ve got local maps with routes home and to alternate bug out locations like relatives homes marked in bright marker. Makes them easier to use in a stressful/dark situations. I’ve got matches, toilet paper, a pen and paper, chapstick, and a small first aid kit. I’m not on any prescription meds, but I’ve got some Xanax and Ambien in there. I won’t be needing or using them. But in a SHTF/EOTW scenario, your almost guaranteed to have someone close by/with you who’s freaking out/having trouble dealing, and it’s nice to have an option for dealing with that (besides than shooting them!) I only have the one source of fire as this is an urban survival kit. I’m unlikely to need a signal mirror, but had a blank CD lying around and figured I’d include it to act as one, just in case.

 

post-1319-1385149763064_thumb.jpg

Food wise I have just the basics. Three bottles of water and a few snacks. The idea is to keep my energy up until I can get home, not actually provide a meal. I have a few tea lights that can be used if needed to start a fire or warm something. The rack on the top one is a computer fan cover. I saw plans a few weeks ago for making a small stove out of candy tin and fan cover as a grill. That one used a charcoal briquette, but I plan on melting several tea lights into the tin sometime next week to create a candle based stove. I have some cash in the bag, small bills and coins for vending machines if needed. I have a few larger bills for gas or bribes or what ever as well.

 

My primary carry is a Glock-19 and I have the CCW to go with it. The CCW isn’t valid in Maryland where I’m currently at, but it’s good in all the surrounding states. The Glock is nice for several reasons. 9mm ammo is easy to find and my wife (and in a few years oldest child) can handle it if needed. Again, it’s not flashy, more of a law enforcement weapon and less likely to draw attention than a chrome hand cannon. Since the bag is based on being at work and Maryland’s gun laws are really messed up there’s a good chance I won’t have this with me. There’s always that wrecking bar though. 5 pic max, but you all know what a 19 looks like.

 

The bag’s almost full, but there are a few things I’d like to add still. Top of that list is an extra battery or charging source for my cell phone. Yeah the towers may not being working right after, but if I do have to walk out and end up in an area where they are working it would be really nice to be able to call for a ride. I’d also like to include a small radio for news/weather info.

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Here’s my bag and contents. First let me say, this isn’t really a BOB. I have a wife with medical issues and 4 young children. I don’t have a bug out bag, I have a large SUV with a roof rack. This is my Get Home Bag. I work 25 miles from our home, near Washington DC. If something happens during the 10+ hours a day when I’m out, I need to be home 20 minutes ago. If the roads are open I’ll just drive. If not, I have this bag.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]120[/ATTACH]

First the bag. I chose this bag for 3 reasons. I had it on hand already from a conference. Unlike most free swag, it’s very well made. Second, it’s the right size. I need something to sustain me for 3 – 12 hours depending on how far I can make it in the car. I need something that helps me get home faster, not something that slows me down. On a bus, hitching a ride, on a bike, or on foot, this bag is small enough to not get in the way or slow me down. Finally, this thing just blends in. It fits in an urban environment and does not draw attention to itself or me. SHTF or TEOTWAWKI, attention = hassle = delay.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]121[/ATTACH]

I expect to be using this bag from work. Office drone clothing is not SHTF friendly so I’ve got a nylon wind breaker in there to keep me dry and add a little warmth. My shoes should be OK but a dry pair of socks can do wonders. The colorful fabric is a sarong I picked up a few years back. It can do most of what a bandana can do plus function as a towel or provide some warmth. If needed, it can be cut down into 6 – 8 bandana sized pieces. The bright colors allow it to function as a signal cloth as well. The trash bags can act as rain shields or an awning if needed, but mostly I plan on using them to give me somewhere dry to sit and rest as needed.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]122[/ATTACH]

Tool wise, here’s what I’ve got. Goggles and masks incase of smoke/ash/dust, or something nasty like bio/chem/nuclear. The latter being a real possibility around DC, I considered upgrading to an actual gas mask, but have currently opted for the cheaper, less conspicuous option. Duct tape, wire, and wire hanger for many possible uses, along with a small knife and compass. Some Velcro I had in the office was also small enough to be included for possible use stowing a jacket or something on the pack. I opted for a more expensive headlamp as traveling in the dark is likely. I have spare batteries for it and a slip of paper between the battery and contact to keep if from accidentally turning on. The survival whistle is mostly in there for the thermometer on it, although it does serve as a back up compass as well. SHTF always involves downed trees around here. That’s the most likely thing to keep me from being able to drive home. Since it’s not practical for me to keep my chainsaw in the trunk I packed a small saw. If needed I may be able to saw/break my way through an obstruction and not have to abandon the car. I’m hoping to upgrade this to a Saber Cut saw at some point. And finally the work gloves and wrecking bar. Warmth and physical protection make the gloves a must. The ability of the bar to provide egress or ingress to damaged buildings or cars and the fact that it’s a big, black, intimidating piece of steel in a gun unfriendly state makes it worth the extra weight.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]123[/ATTACH]

A large ziplock bag provides dry storage. I’ve got local maps with routes home and to alternate bug out locations like relatives homes marked in bright marker. Makes them easier to use in a stressful/dark situations. I’ve got matches, toilet paper, a pen and paper, chapstick, and a small first aid kit. I’m not on any prescription meds, but I’ve got some Xanax and Ambien in there. I won’t be needing or using them. But in a SHTF/EOTW scenario, your almost guaranteed to have someone close by/with you who’s freaking out/having trouble dealing, and it’s nice to have an option for dealing with that (besides than shooting them!) I only have the one source of fire as this is an urban survival kit. I’m unlikely to need a signal mirror, but had a blank CD lying around and figured I’d include it to act as one, just in case.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]124[/ATTACH]

Food wise I have just the basics. Three bottles of water and a few snacks. The idea is to keep my energy up until I can get home, not actually provide a meal. I have a few tea lights that can be used if needed to start a fire or warm something. The rack on the top one is a computer fan cover. I saw plans a few weeks ago for making a small stove out of candy tin and fan cover as a grill. That one used a charcoal briquette, but I plan on melting several tea lights into the tin sometime next week to create a candle based stove. I have some cash in the bag, small bills and coins for vending machines if needed. I have a few larger bills for gas or bribes or what ever as well.

 

My primary carry is a Glock-19 and I have the CCW to go with it. The CCW isn’t valid in Maryland where I’m currently at, but it’s good in all the surrounding states. The Glock is nice for several reasons. 9mm ammo is easy to find and my wife (and in a few years oldest child) can handle it if needed. Again, it’s not flashy, more of a law enforcement weapon and less likely to draw attention than a chrome hand cannon. Since the bag is based on being at work and Maryland’s gun laws are really messed up there’s a good chance I won’t have this with me. There’s always that wrecking bar though. 5 pic max, but you all know what a 19 looks like.

 

The bag’s almost full, but there are a few things I’d like to add still. Top of that list is an extra battery or charging source for my cell phone. Yeah the towers may not being working right after, but if I do have to walk out and end up in an area where they are working it would be really nice to be able to call for a ride. I’d also like to include a small radio for news/weather info.

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post-1319-13851497695717_thumb.jpg

post-1319-13851497696035_thumb.jpg

post-1319-13851497696309_thumb.jpg

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SURVIVAL SUPPLY LIST:

Items may be modified, must be the highest quality possible, and use only self-acquiring energy if possible. They must be waterproof or in waterproof cases and be climate and temperature tolerant. Items must be MultiCam or inconspicuous if possible unless for signaling.

 

Built on a tier system, Tier One goes into Tier Two goes into Tier Three.

 

The Medical and Hygiene items are very important. Lack of proper foot, dental care, etc. can lead to infection to gangrene and finally to death. For this reason I have nail clippers with file, etc. I also have drying powder and moleskin for chaffing, blisters, and foot care. You won't make it far with a raw rear, feet, or nipples. The same goes for a sore throat. If you've ever had such a sore throat you could only consume liquids you know what I mean. I carry ibuprofen (Bayer) for if heart issues arise, but acetaminophen (Tylenol) for other pain issues. Ibuprofen will cause stomach issues if overused. Intestinal sedatives and prescription glasses/goggles are also important (contacts don't last forever).

 

I use a flashdrive, phone, and micro SD/SD card for data storage. It's much easier than carrying your important easily destroyed papers. DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU CANNOT TRUST YOURSELF TO NOT LOSE IT!!!

 

TIER ONE: EVERY DAY CARRY:

post-1333-13851497630967_thumb.jpg

Everything fits in my pockets with exception of the headlamp. I have to use a normal flashlight or wear cargo pants otherwise.

 

RIGGER'S BELT/POCKETS:

  • KEYCHAIN AS BELOW
  • WALLET AS BELOW
  • SMART PHONE WITH SIM CARD
  • ZIPPO LIGHTER
    I use a Zippo because they are good in wind and refillable with various fuels. BIC's last longer. Both are kept close to the body due to lighters not working well cold.
  • LED FLASHLIGHT (HEADLAMP) (PRINCTON TEC)
    The headlamp is for hands-free light. The Apex Pro is great, having multiple beams, modes, lithium battery and is 'waterproof'. It can hit 200 lumens, depending on mode, anything under 70 lumens being next to worthless in my opinion.
  • LEATHERMAN SUPER TOOL 300 BLACK
    A multi-tool is durable, compact, and versatile. I have the Black version to be less noticeable and reflective. The Super Tool 300 has most of the features one could ask for (after much comparing on their comparison website feature). I use the small knife for small tasks and to not scare others or draw attention.
  • WIRE SAW
  • SNARE WIRE
  • WATERPROOF SPACE PEN (FISHER)
  • WATERPROOF NOTEPAD (RITE IN RAIN)

KEYCHAIN:


  • KEYS
  • MIL-SPEC MIL-C-5040 Type III PARACORD LANYARD
    I've weaved this in a way which only takes one hand and something to stop the other end to pull it apart, which is nice if the other hand doesn't work. I leave the keys in my back pocket, so unless I'm in an area I'm worried about theft it is nice to pull them out quickly.
  • CARABINER (OMEGA)
    Multiple uses, from organizing, to quickly attaching to something for hauling, lifting, etc.
  • FIRESTEEL
  • MILITARY GRADE FLASH DRIVE
  • PEALESS JET WHISTLE
    A whistle is great because it requires much less energy than yelling and can be heard farther away. Get a plastic one because of metal in winter. Go with a pealess one because they are more reliable and have one less part to worry about.

WALLET:

  • FUNDS:
    a. PAPER MONEY
    b. COINAGE (SILVER)
    c. BANK CARD
    d. CREDIT CARD
    e. PHONE CARD
  • CARD-SIZED DIAMOND SHARPENER
  • LOCK PICKS WITH PEN SPRING AND SAFETY PIN (SEREPICK.COM)
    These are for when discretion is the better part of valor. A safety pin can be put through a click-pen spring as can two pics and then pinned inside a layer of clothing. No it's not really a bug out item, but the size and weight are next to nothing.
  • IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS IN ZIPLOCK
  • DATA STORAGE:
    a. MICRO SD CARD WITH SD CARD ADAPTER
  • FIRE:
    a. WAXED CHARCLOTH
    b. WATERPROOF MATCHES
  • HEALTH:
    a. BANDAGES
    b. FLAT RAZOR
    c. ANTISEPTIC WIPE
    d. MOLESKIN BANDAGES

 

TIER TWO: GET HOME BAG:

Everything with the exception of my Camelbak fits into a laptop bag. I do this so it doesn't draw attention.

 

  • BINOCULARS
  • COMPASS WITH MAGNIFYING GLASS/SUNDIAL (CAMMENGA)
  • TWO LITER POP BOTTLE BLANKS WITH CAPS/GARDEN HOSE PLUGS
  • ZIPLOCK ZIPPABLE FREEZER BAGS (VARIOUS SIZES)
  • CONCORDANCE BIBLE (NIV)
  • SURVIVAL LITERATURE
  • CAMELBAK THERMOBAK AB WITH CBR X BLADDER
    This is hands-free drinking with an NBC bladder. The Thermobak AB can be used as a stand-alone system or attached to body armor. It has a 3 liter capacity which is a must in my opinion. It's nice being back mounted for carrying, and collapsible as a bladder system.

FOOD, SUPPLEMENTS, AND WATER:

  • PEMMICAN
    If it's good enough for Antarctica it's good enough for me. Look it up. :)
  • INSTANT OATMEAL
  • INSTANT TEA
  • RATIONS
  • PROTIEN BARS/DATREX BARS
  • MULTIVITAMINS, MINERALS, SUPPLEMENTS
    a. These are stored in three pop bottle blanks.
  • WATER

MEDICAL:

All the medical supplies fit into shaving kit bags or canteen pouches. The bandages, gausse, wrap, antiseptic wipes, wrap, and brace all go into one. The rest fits into three more, or can be put into canteen pouches for mounting on MOLLE for quick access.

post-1333-13851497631325_thumb.jpg

  • PRESCRIPTION GLASSES WITH CASE

KIT: FIRST AID

  • MEDICINE
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
  • INTESTINAL SEDATIVE
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. IMMODIUM PILLS
    c. PEPTOBISMOL PILLS
  • PAIN KILLER
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. IBUPROFEN (BAYER)
    c. ACETAMINOPHEN (TYLENOL)
  • SORE THROAT/COLD
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. SUPHEDRINE
    c. SUCRETS
  • ANTIHYSTIMINE (BENADRYL)
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • ANTI-MALARIA TABLETS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • ESSENTIAL OILS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • PETROLEUM JELLY (VASOLINE)
  • GOLD BOND/DRYING POWDER
  • EYE DROPS
  • BANDAGES
    a. BAND-AID
    b. ISRAELI
    c. MOLESKIN
  • ANTISEPTIC PADS
  • GAUSSE
  • SPLINTS
  • WRAP
  • BACTINE
  • UNSCENTED ANTISEPTIC WIPES
  • ANTIBIOTIC
  • ANTICBACTERIAL, ANTIVIRAL, ANTIMICROBIAL
  • COTTONSWABS

KIT: SURGICAL SEWING

  • RAZOR/SCALPEL
  • SEWING NEEDLE
  • THREAD

KIT: POISON

  • IPECAC
  • POISON DRAW KIT

KIT: BURN

  • ALOE LOTION WITH LIDOCAINE HCI
  • SUN BLOCK AND INSCECT REPELLANT IN ONE (DEET-FREE)

KIT: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

  • IODINE TABLETS

  • INSECT NET

HYGIENE KIT:

The nail clippers with file, tweezers, and unscented q-tips all fit into one pop bottle blank. The whole kit fits into a small shaving kit bag (see pic).

  • TOOTHPASTE
  • TOOTHBRUSH
  • NAIL CLIPPERS WITH FILE
  • TWEEZERS
  • UNSCENTED Q-TIPS
  • WASH CLOTH (MCNETT)
  • BODY TOWEL (MCNETT)
  • UNSCENTED SOAP
  • UNSCENTED TOILET PAPER/WIPES

TIER THREE: SEVENTY TWO HOUR BUG OUT BAG:

 

This currently is in a backpack.

FISHING KIT:

All of this fits into one pop bottle blank. Pictured is the fishing kit and a sewing kit. The thread is on a spool under the cap. Cloth can be rolled around the needles.

post-1333-13851497631757_thumb.jpg

  • EYE HOOK
    Use this with a stick as a rod.
  • HOOKS (EAGLE CLAW)
  • BOBBER
  • SINKERS (NON-LEAD)
  • SWIVELS
  • LINE (SPIDERWIRE)
  • TACKLE

ACQUIREMENT AND PREPARATION:


  • KATADYN MICROPUR WATER TABLETS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.

TINDER BOX:

  • BLAST MATCH
    This is an easy to use one-handed fire starter. Watch the Ultimate Survival Technologies videos on them.
  • ZIPPO LIGHTER AND FLUID
  • WATERPROOF MATCHES
  • WAXED CHARCLOTH
  • WET FIRE TINDER
  • CONSUMABLE CLEAR EIGHTY PLUS PROOF ALCOHOL
    This can be fuel or a trade good.
  • TEA LIGHT CANDLES

CLOTHING:

  • BOXER-BRIEFS
  • UNDERSHIRT
  • LONG SOCKS
  • THERMAL:
  • UNDERPANTS
  • UNDERSHIRT
  • SOCKS
  • U.S.G.I.:
  • BELT
  • LONGSLEEVE SHIRT
  • PANTS
  • SWEATER
  • FAST ROPE GLOVES
  • U.S.G.I. COMBAT BOOTS
  • 2xSHEMAGH
  • RAIN COAT/PONCHO

INDUSTRIAL SEWING KIT:

All of this with exception of the curved sewing all fits into one pop bottle blank. More parachute cloth can be added apart from the kit if desired.

  • INDUSTRIAL NEEDLES
  • THREAD/NYLON TWINE
  • SAFETY PINS
  • SEWING AWL
  • PARACHUTE CLOTH

TOOLS:

post-1333-13851497632449_thumb.jpg

  • BUSSE BOSS JACK COMBAT GRADE KNIFE
  • NEPALESE KUKRI
    Kukris made in Nepal, unlike most American ones, have thicker blades, adding force. The forward design and thick blade of the kukri makes it good for chopping and combat. It can also be used for skinning and other tasks. A 15" blade is nice for both chopping and combat without being too big or small. I've heard Cold Steel's is nice, but have not used it.
  • MIL-SPEC MIL-C-5040 Type III PARACORD

SHELTER:

  • WIGGY’S SLEEP SYSTEM
    One could go with the U.S.G.I. Modular Sleep System. This is for a variety of temperatures. All I have to say is after sleeping in -35 degree weather without the right gear, I'll make sure I have it.
  • U.S.G.I. CASUALTY BLANKET
    This is more durable than a space blanket.
  • U.S.G.I. CANVAS TARP
  • NET HAMMOCK
  • TITANIUM NAIL TENT PEGS (VARGO)
  • BUG NETTING

SELF-DEFENSE:

post-1333-13851497632101_thumb.jpg

  • BERETTA M9A1 (Currently this is a Beretta 96A1.)
  • AMMUNITION

Note: The pictures are outdated by the current list but you get the idea.

 

The (Pop Bottle Blanks) can be found here: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/product/test-tubes

Edited by Canteen81

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SURVIVAL SUPPLY LIST:

Items may be modified, must be the highest quality possible, and use only self-acquiring energy if possible. They must be waterproof or in waterproof cases and be climate and temperature tolerant. Items must be MultiCam or inconspicuous if possible unless for signaling.

 

Built on a tier system, Tier One goes into Tier Two goes into Tier Three.

 

The Medical and Hygiene items are very important. Lack of proper foot, dental care, etc. can lead to infection to gangrene and finally to death. For this reason I have nail clippers with file, etc. I also have drying powder and moleskin for chaffing, blisters, and foot care. You won't make it far with a raw rear, feet, or nipples. The same goes for a sore throat. If you've ever had such a sore throat you could only consume liquids you know what I mean. I carry ibuprofen (Bayer) for if heart issues arise, but acetaminophen (Tylenol) for other pain issues. Ibuprofen will cause stomach issues if overused. Intestinal sedatives and prescription glasses/goggles are also important (contacts don't last forever).

 

I use a flashdrive, phone, and micro SD/SD card for data storage. It's much easier than carrying your important easily destroyed papers. DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU CANNOT TRUST YOURSELF TO NOT LOSE IT!!!

 

TIER ONE: EVERY DAY CARRY:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]125[/ATTACH]

Everything fits in my pockets with exception of the headlamp. I have to use a normal flashlight or wear cargo pants otherwise.

 

RIGGER'S BELT/POCKETS:

  • KEYCHAIN AS BELOW
  • WALLET AS BELOW
  • SMART PHONE WITH SIM CARD
  • ZIPPO LIGHTER
    I use a Zippo because they are good in wind and refillable with various fuels. BIC's last longer. Both are kept close to the body due to lighters not working well cold.
  • LED FLASHLIGHT (HEADLAMP) (PRINCTON TEC)
    The headlamp is for hands-free light. The Apex Pro is great, having multiple beams, modes, lithium battery and is 'waterproof'. It can hit 200 lumens, depending on mode, anything under 70 lumens being next to worthless in my opinion.
  • LEATHERMAN SUPER TOOL 300 BLACK
    A multi-tool is durable, compact, and versatile. I have the Black version to be less noticeable and reflective. The Super Tool 300 has most of the features one could ask for (after much comparing on their comparison website feature). I use the small knife for small tasks and to not scare others or draw attention.
  • WIRE SAW
  • SNARE WIRE
  • WATERPROOF SPACE PEN (FISHER)
  • WATERPROOF NOTEPAD (RITE IN RAIN)

KEYCHAIN:


  • KEYS
  • MIL-SPEC MIL-C-5040 Type III PARACORD LANYARD
    I've weaved this in a way which only takes one hand and something to stop the other end to pull it apart, which is nice if the other hand doesn't work. I leave the keys in my back pocket, so unless I'm in an area I'm worried about theft it is nice to pull them out quickly.
  • CARABINER (OMEGA)
    Multiple uses, from organizing, to quickly attaching to something for hauling, lifting, etc.
  • FIRESTEEL
  • MILITARY GRADE FLASH DRIVE
  • PEALESS JET WHISTLE
    A whistle is great because it requires much less energy than yelling and can be heard farther away. Get a plastic one because of metal in winter. Go with a pealess one because they are more reliable and have one less part to worry about.

WALLET:

  • FUNDS:
    a. PAPER MONEY
    b. COINAGE (SILVER)
    c. BANK CARD
    d. CREDIT CARD
    e. PHONE CARD
  • CARD-SIZED DIAMOND SHARPENER
  • LOCK PICKS WITH PEN SPRING AND SAFETY PIN (SEREPICK.COM)
    These are for when discretion is the better part of valor. A safety pin can be put through a click-pen spring as can two pics and then pinned inside a layer of clothing. No it's not really a bug out item, but the size and weight are next to nothing.
  • IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS IN ZIPLOCK
  • DATA STORAGE:
    a. MICRO SD CARD WITH SD CARD ADAPTER
  • FIRE:
    a. WAXED CHARCLOTH
    b. WATERPROOF MATCHES
  • HEALTH:
    a. BANDAGES
    b. FLAT RAZOR
    c. ANTISEPTIC WIPE
    d. MOLESKIN BANDAGES

 

TIER TWO: GET HOME BAG:

Everything with the exception of my Camelbak fits into a laptop bag. I do this so it doesn't draw attention.

 

  • BINOCULARS
  • COMPASS WITH MAGNIFYING GLASS/SUNDIAL (CAMMENGA)
  • TWO LITER POP BOTTLE BLANKS WITH CAPS/GARDEN HOSE PLUGS
  • ZIPLOCK ZIPPABLE FREEZER BAGS (VARIOUS SIZES)
  • CONCORDANCE BIBLE (NIV)
  • SURVIVAL LITERATURE
  • CAMELBAK THERMOBAK AB WITH CBR X BLADDER
    This is hands-free drinking with an NBC bladder. The Thermobak AB can be used as a stand-alone system or attached to body armor. It has a 3 liter capacity which is a must in my opinion. It's nice being back mounted for carrying, and collapsible as a bladder system.

FOOD, SUPPLEMENTS, AND WATER:

  • PEMMICAN
    If it's good enough for Antarctica it's good enough for me. Look it up. :)
  • INSTANT OATMEAL
  • INSTANT TEA
  • RATIONS
  • PROTIEN BARS/DATREX BARS
  • MULTIVITAMINS, MINERALS, SUPPLEMENTS
    a. These are stored in three pop bottle blanks.
  • WATER

MEDICAL:

All the medical supplies fit into shaving kit bags or canteen pouches. The bandages, gausse, wrap, antiseptic wipes, wrap, and brace all go into one. The rest fits into three more, or can be put into canteen pouches for mounting on MOLLE for quick access.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]135[/ATTACH]

  • PRESCRIPTION GLASSES WITH CASE

KIT: FIRST AID

  • MEDICINE
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
  • INTESTINAL SEDATIVE
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. IMMODIUM PILLS
    c. PEPTOBISMOL PILLS
  • PAIN KILLER
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. IBUPROFEN (BAYER)
    c. ACETAMINOPHEN (TYLENOL)
  • SORE THROAT/COLD
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank. Separated by bingo chips.
    b. SUPHEDRINE
    c. SUCRETS
  • ANTIHYSTIMINE (BENADRYL)
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • ANTI-MALARIA TABLETS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • ESSENTIAL OILS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.
  • PETROLEUM JELLY (VASOLINE)
  • GOLD BOND/DRYING POWDER
  • EYE DROPS
  • BANDAGES
    a. BAND-AID
    b. ISRAELI
    c. MOLESKIN
  • ANTISEPTIC PADS
  • GAUSSE
  • SPLINTS
  • WRAP
  • BACTINE
  • UNSCENTED ANTISEPTIC WIPES
  • ANTIBIOTIC
  • ANTICBACTERIAL, ANTIVIRAL, ANTIMICROBIAL
  • COTTONSWABS

KIT: SURGICAL SEWING

  • RAZOR/SCALPEL
  • SEWING NEEDLE
  • THREAD

KIT: POISON

  • IPECAC
  • POISON DRAW KIT

KIT: BURN

  • ALOE LOTION WITH LIDOCAINE HCI
  • SUN BLOCK AND INSCECT REPELLANT IN ONE (DEET-FREE)

KIT: HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

  • IODINE TABLETS

  • INSECT NET

HYGIENE KIT:

The nail clippers with file, tweezers, and unscented q-tips all fit into one pop bottle blank. The whole kit fits into a small shaving kit bag (see pic).

  • TOOTHPASTE
  • TOOTHBRUSH
  • NAIL CLIPPERS WITH FILE
  • TWEEZERS
  • UNSCENTED Q-TIPS
  • WASH CLOTH (MCNETT)
  • BODY TOWEL (MCNETT)
  • UNSCENTED SOAP
  • UNSCENTED TOILET PAPER/WIPES

TIER THREE: SEVENTY TWO HOUR BUG OUT BAG:

 

This currently is in a backpack.

FISHING KIT:

All of this fits into one pop bottle blank. Pictured is the fishing kit and a sewing kit. The thread is on a spool under the cap. Cloth can be rolled around the needles.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]136[/ATTACH]

  • EYE HOOK
    Use this with a stick as a rod.
  • HOOKS (EAGLE CLAW)
  • BOBBER
  • SINKERS (NON-LEAD)
  • SWIVELS
  • LINE (SPIDERWIRE)
  • TACKLE

ACQUIREMENT AND PREPARATION:


  • KATADYN MICROPUR WATER TABLETS
    a. Stored in one pop bottle blank.

TINDER BOX:

  • BLAST MATCH
    This is an easy to use one-handed fire starter. Watch the Ultimate Survival Technologies videos on them.
  • ZIPPO LIGHTER AND FLUID
  • WATERPROOF MATCHES
  • WAXED CHARCLOTH
  • WET FIRE TINDER
  • CONSUMABLE CLEAR EIGHTY PLUS PROOF ALCOHOL
    This can be fuel or a trade good.
  • TEA LIGHT CANDLES

CLOTHING:

  • BOXER-BRIEFS
  • UNDERSHIRT
  • LONG SOCKS
  • THERMAL:
  • UNDERPANTS
  • UNDERSHIRT
  • SOCKS
  • U.S.G.I.:
  • BELT
  • LONGSLEEVE SHIRT
  • PANTS
  • SWEATER
  • FAST ROPE GLOVES
  • U.S.G.I. COMBAT BOOTS
  • 2xSHEMAGH
  • RAIN COAT/PONCHO

INDUSTRIAL SEWING KIT:

All of this with exception of the curved sewing all fits into one pop bottle blank. More parachute cloth can be added apart from the kit if desired.

  • INDUSTRIAL NEEDLES
  • THREAD/NYLON TWINE
  • SAFETY PINS
  • SEWING AWL
  • PARACHUTE CLOTH

TOOLS:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]138[/ATTACH]

  • BUSSE BOSS JACK COMBAT GRADE KNIFE
  • NEPALESE KUKRI
    Kukris made in Nepal, unlike most American ones, have thicker blades, adding force. The forward design and thick blade of the kukri makes it good for chopping and combat. It can also be used for skinning and other tasks. A 15" blade is nice for both chopping and combat without being too big or small. I've heard Cold Steel's is nice, but have not used it.
  • MIL-SPEC MIL-C-5040 Type III PARACORD

SHELTER:

  • WIGGY’S SLEEP SYSTEM
    One could go with the U.S.G.I. Modular Sleep System. This is for a variety of temperatures. All I have to say is after sleeping in -35 degree weather without the right gear, I'll make sure I have it.
  • U.S.G.I. CASUALTY BLANKET
    This is more durable than a space blanket.
  • U.S.G.I. CANVAS TARP
  • NET HAMMOCK
  • TITANIUM NAIL TENT PEGS (VARGO)
  • BUG NETTING

SELF-DEFENSE:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]137[/ATTACH]

  • BERETTA M9A1 (Currently this is a Beretta 96A1.)
  • AMMUNITION

Note: The pictures are outdated by the current list but you get the idea.

 

The (Pop Bottle Blanks) can be found here: http://www.stevespanglerscience.com/product/test-tubes

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post-1333-13851497697745_thumb.jpg

post-1333-13851497698074_thumb.jpg

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BUG OUT BAG CONTEST INITIAL ENTRY

 

My Outlook on Bug Out Bag Survival Equipment

 

If you have ever searched on EBAY, or even looked at survival and camping equipment in your local stores, whether that be Wal Mart or Scheels, Campmor or anybody else, you know that the greater portion of equipment being sold today is low quality, overpriced, and would never stand up to rigorous use. Having a $500 tent that rips apart in the first stint of poor weather does you no good and seriously depletes your finances.

Therefor, I have assembled my bags with a little different goal in mind compared to “normal”. There are just a few maxims I adhere to regarding this;

 

1. If I am to bug out- my family must come with me. Why would I even try if I had to leave my family?

 

2. The grand kids will not be able to hump an 80 pound load. I will not be able to hump an 80 pound load very long. Therefor we take what we absolutely need and very little else. And first I must get to them or they must get to me. It’s the survival of the herd that’s important, no matter how Rambo you may feel.

 

3. The average shed, garage, or basement is a far superior shelter compared to anything I might be able to take with me or construct on site. I will not abandon my strongest shelter unless absolutely necessary. If I do, my first choice of destination is within walking distance. We will regroup there and decide if further movement is a good idea.

 

4. Equipment and supplies must be spread out. Losing one bag should never be allowed to deplete 100% of anything.(Your 1st Aid supplies for instance)

 

5. If it’s CRAP – don’t bother packing it.

 

6. Cheap is not the same thing as CRAP. If I can’t afford something, I won’t have it when it’s needed. Will it do its intended job? Will it break? Could I fix it?

 

7. Keep it simple. Keep it flexible. Keep it real. The bug out bag will never support a small colony for two years in the wilderness, with no support. It will keep your family alive and sane in a very scary change of situation. I plan mine for the 72 hour scenario. It can stretch to about a week depending on the situation.

 

8. The actual situation when you bug out can not be forecast. Is there a brand new baby? Is one of the kids severely ill? I keep a totally empty bug out bag along side the rest for those last minute things we will need to deal with, like medicines, diapers or whatever we neglected to prepare for. Just grab things and stuff them in- quick.

 

9. My bug out bags are actually a system designed to either stand alone or augment each other, depending on how many people are involved. (Just me and my wife? Also the grandkids? Maybe the daughters and their husbands? Or maybe I can just throw all the bags in the car if we are lucky enough to drive to our next destination. Its also a great idea to have extra storage if you have an opportunity to be supplied by the red cross or whomever with water and supplies.

 

10. We have 5 backpack style bags, numbered from 1 to 5. Bag 1 and 2 are primary bags for me and my wife. Bag 5 is the empty standby bag and is stored in the closet at home along with Bag 1 and 2. Bag 3 and 4 are support bags and are stored in my wife’s car and my pickup, where they double as work bug out bags and winter survival should we go in the ditch and have to spend a long time waiting for help. The vehicles also have a sleeping bag in each and a set of tools, extra clothing etc. I made bags for our kid’s families to get them started and allow them to mesh in with my system if and when we are reunited.

 

What’s in my bags and where is it?

 

A copy of the inventory is in each bag. It also tells you which bags have any of the items in them, which allows you to find items much easier. Small items are “grouped”. For instance the first aid pouch has all the first aid items (in that particular bag). So if you need first aid that’s the only place you need to look. The inventory will tell you if there if an item you want is in a different bag.

 

 

Nomenclature Bag # QTY Exp Date

 

Advil, Pain 1 3

Advil, Pain 2 3

Ammonia, Crush Tube 1 10

Ammonia, Crush Tube 2 1

Bag, Emg Slp 1,2 2

Bag, Water Carrying 1,2 2

Bandage, Compress 1 2

Bandage, Compress 1 1

Band Aid 1 6

Band Aid 2 6

Battery AA 1,2 2

Battery D Cell 1,2 2

Box, Plastic 1,2,3,4 4

Burn Gel 1 2

Burn Gel 2 2

Candle, 120 Hr 2 1

Candle, Utility 1,2,3,4 17

Canteen 1,2,3,4 4

Chap Stick 1,2 2

Chem Lite 1,2,3,4 16

Clips, Hair 2 1

Cord, Braided, Green 2 1

Cord, Braided, Pink 1 1

Deodorant, Stick 1,2 2

Diarrhea Medicine 1 1

Dressing 2 1

Dressing,1st Aid 1 2

Eye Drops 1 1

Flashlight, Angle 1,2 2

Flashlight, LED 1,2 2

Floss, Dental 2 1

Gauze, 4x4 1,2 12

Gauze, Roll 1 1

Glasses, Bon 2 1

Glasses, Jeff 1 1

Gloves, Latex Exam 2 3

Gloves, Leather,work 1 1

Gloves, Work 2 1

Hat, Knit, Orange 1,2,3,4 4

Ice Pack, Chemical 1,2 4

Kit, Eyeglass Repair 1 1

Kit, Sewing 1 1

Kleenex 1,2,3,4 4

Knife, Lock Back 2 1

Knife, Marlin 1 1

Knife, Raft 1 1

Knife, Small, Red 3 1

Knife, Small,Blue 4 1

Knife, Swiss 2 1

Laxative 2 1

Lense, Magnifying 2 1

Line, Fishing 1 1

Mask, Dust 1 3

Mask, Dust 2 2

Matches, Waterproof 1,2,3,4 4

Meal,TOTM 1,2 12

Meals, MRE 3,4 12

Meds, Jeff 1 7

Mirror, Signal 1 1

Moisturizer 1,2,3,4 4

Needles, Repair 1 1

Ointment, 1st Aid 1 1

Opener, Can 1,2 2

OraJel 2 1

Pads, Kotex 2 1

Phone card 1,2,3,4 4

Pin, Safety 1,2,3,4 4

Poncho, Emg 1,2,34 4

Pouch, Document 1,2,3,4 4

Q-Tips 1 1

Radio, FR300 1 1

Radio, Transistor 2 1

Repellant, Insect 2 1

Scalpel, Blade Only 1 1

Scissors 1 1

Shampoo 1,2 4

Sinus Medicine 2 1

Siphon, Gasoline 1,2,3,4 4

Soap, Bar 1,2,3,4 4

Starter, Fire 1 1

Swab, Iodine 1 1

Swabs, Iodine 2 1

Tape, Adhesive 1 2

Tape, Adhesive 2 1

Tape, Duct 1,2 2

Thermometer 1 3

Thermometer 2 2

Tool, Multi Plers 1,2 2

Toothbrush 1,2 8

Tweezer 1 1

Tweezer 2 1

Warmer,Chemical 1,2,3,4 4

Water,Aqua Blox 1,2,3,4 48

Whistle, Black 2 1

Whistle, Orange 1 1

Wire, .032 1 1

Wrap, Stretch 1 1

Wrap, Stretch 2 1

 

Remember I said to keep it simple. Yes, I have guns, and ammo, and this and that, but while there is much survival value in the other equipment / supplies I have prepared, they are not part of my bug out bags.

*************************************************

A few specifics for you to think about:

1. Anything you need from these bags, you are likely to need quickly. A big MRE is not hard to see, but where is that safety pin? Try to pack components in a transparent container. I used several zippered clear plastic bags from the draperies my wife bought-they were almost perfect for this use- soft,water resistant, clear, and very sturdy.

2. Be sure and vary your gear as much as possible. All my bags (except empty Bag 5) have a knife, but each knife is different, to give us the very best selection of options. For example a raft knife with multiple fold out tools, a drop point hunting knife, large folding knife with a marlon spike on it, swiss army knife, and or leatherman style tools.

3. Notice the bright orange stocking hat. There is one (or more) in every bag in my family group. Not for warmth, although they help with that too, but to help the old man (me) keep tabs on where my people are. Also could help find little ones if they wander off in a crowd. Crowds are all too likely at first, until you can distance yourself from population groups.

4. Part of my gear is relatively old technology. In reviewing this inventory you can probably see some ways to improve. Right off I see that the D cell battery stuff needs to go away. LED stuff will let me drop quite a bit of weight from the total.

5. Two of my bags have manual siphon hoses for obtaining gasoline. Invaluable in my opinion, even if you are on foot now…that may change.

6. Probably the most important feature of my bags is water. I use AquaBlox brand, as they are portable and freezable, and have a 5 year shelf life. As with any water it’s too heavy to carry as much as you would like to. Be sure and include some way to obtain and carry replacement water after your carried water is used up.

******************************************************

 

I truly hope that you consider some of the ideas I have listed here, and if you find them valid, that you incorporate them into your own bug out bag. I certainly will be reading all the submissions and looking for some better ideas for mine.

Semper Fi!

Devildog

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BUG OUT BAG CONTEST INITIAL ENTRY

 

My Outlook on Bug Out Bag Survival Equipment

 

If you have ever searched on EBAY, or even looked at survival and camping equipment in your local stores, whether that be Wal Mart or Scheels, Campmor or anybody else, you know that the greater portion of equipment being sold today is low quality, overpriced, and would never stand up to rigorous use. Having a $500 tent that rips apart in the first stint of poor weather does you no good and seriously depletes your finances.

Therefor, I have assembled my bags with a little different goal in mind compared to “normal”. There are just a few maxims I adhere to regarding this;

 

1. If I am to bug out- my family must come with me. Why would I even try if I had to leave my family?

 

2. The grand kids will not be able to hump an 80 pound load. I will not be able to hump an 80 pound load very long. Therefor we take what we absolutely need and very little else. And first I must get to them or they must get to me. It’s the survival of the herd that’s important, no matter how Rambo you may feel.

 

3. The average shed, garage, or basement is a far superior shelter compared to anything I might be able to take with me or construct on site. I will not abandon my strongest shelter unless absolutely necessary. If I do, my first choice of destination is within walking distance. We will regroup there and decide if further movement is a good idea.

 

4. Equipment and supplies must be spread out. Losing one bag should never be allowed to deplete 100% of anything.(Your 1st Aid supplies for instance)

 

5. If it’s CRAP – don’t bother packing it.

 

6. Cheap is not the same thing as CRAP. If I can’t afford something, I won’t have it when it’s needed. Will it do its intended job? Will it break? Could I fix it?

 

7. Keep it simple. Keep it flexible. Keep it real. The bug out bag will never support a small colony for two years in the wilderness, with no support. It will keep your family alive and sane in a very scary change of situation. I plan mine for the 72 hour scenario. It can stretch to about a week depending on the situation.

 

8. The actual situation when you bug out can not be forecast. Is there a brand new baby? Is one of the kids severely ill? I keep a totally empty bug out bag along side the rest for those last minute things we will need to deal with, like medicines, diapers or whatever we neglected to prepare for. Just grab things and stuff them in- quick.

 

9. My bug out bags are actually a system designed to either stand alone or augment each other, depending on how many people are involved. (Just me and my wife? Also the grandkids? Maybe the daughters and their husbands? Or maybe I can just throw all the bags in the car if we are lucky enough to drive to our next destination. Its also a great idea to have extra storage if you have an opportunity to be supplied by the red cross or whomever with water and supplies.

 

10. We have 5 backpack style bags, numbered from 1 to 5. Bag 1 and 2 are primary bags for me and my wife. Bag 5 is the empty standby bag and is stored in the closet at home along with Bag 1 and 2. Bag 3 and 4 are support bags and are stored in my wife’s car and my pickup, where they double as work bug out bags and winter survival should we go in the ditch and have to spend a long time waiting for help. The vehicles also have a sleeping bag in each and a set of tools, extra clothing etc. I made bags for our kid’s families to get them started and allow them to mesh in with my system if and when we are reunited.

 

What’s in my bags and where is it?

 

A copy of the inventory is in each bag. It also tells you which bags have any of the items in them, which allows you to find items much easier. Small items are “grouped”. For instance the first aid pouch has all the first aid items (in that particular bag). So if you need first aid that’s the only place you need to look. The inventory will tell you if there if an item you want is in a different bag.

 

 

Nomenclature Bag # QTY Exp Date

 

Advil, Pain 1 3

Advil, Pain 2 3

Ammonia, Crush Tube 1 10

Ammonia, Crush Tube 2 1

Bag, Emg Slp 1,2 2

Bag, Water Carrying 1,2 2

Bandage, Compress 1 2

Bandage, Compress 1 1

Band Aid 1 6

Band Aid 2 6

Battery AA 1,2 2

Battery D Cell 1,2 2

Box, Plastic 1,2,3,4 4

Burn Gel 1 2

Burn Gel 2 2

Candle, 120 Hr 2 1

Candle, Utility 1,2,3,4 17

Canteen 1,2,3,4 4

Chap Stick 1,2 2

Chem Lite 1,2,3,4 16

Clips, Hair 2 1

Cord, Braided, Green 2 1

Cord, Braided, Pink 1 1

Deodorant, Stick 1,2 2

Diarrhea Medicine 1 1

Dressing 2 1

Dressing,1st Aid 1 2

Eye Drops 1 1

Flashlight, Angle 1,2 2

Flashlight, LED 1,2 2

Floss, Dental 2 1

Gauze, 4x4 1,2 12

Gauze, Roll 1 1

Glasses, Bon 2 1

Glasses, Jeff 1 1

Gloves, Latex Exam 2 3

Gloves, Leather,work 1 1

Gloves, Work 2 1

Hat, Knit, Orange 1,2,3,4 4

Ice Pack, Chemical 1,2 4

Kit, Eyeglass Repair 1 1

Kit, Sewing 1 1

Kleenex 1,2,3,4 4

Knife, Lock Back 2 1

Knife, Marlin 1 1

Knife, Raft 1 1

Knife, Small, Red 3 1

Knife, Small,Blue 4 1

Knife, Swiss 2 1

Laxative 2 1

Lense, Magnifying 2 1

Line, Fishing 1 1

Mask, Dust 1 3

Mask, Dust 2 2

Matches, Waterproof 1,2,3,4 4

Meal,TOTM 1,2 12

Meals, MRE 3,4 12

Meds, Jeff 1 7

Mirror, Signal 1 1

Moisturizer 1,2,3,4 4

Needles, Repair 1 1

Ointment, 1st Aid 1 1

Opener, Can 1,2 2

OraJel 2 1

Pads, Kotex 2 1

Phone card 1,2,3,4 4

Pin, Safety 1,2,3,4 4

Poncho, Emg 1,2,34 4

Pouch, Document 1,2,3,4 4

Q-Tips 1 1

Radio, FR300 1 1

Radio, Transistor 2 1

Repellant, Insect 2 1

Scalpel, Blade Only 1 1

Scissors 1 1

Shampoo 1,2 4

Sinus Medicine 2 1

Siphon, Gasoline 1,2,3,4 4

Soap, Bar 1,2,3,4 4

Starter, Fire 1 1

Swab, Iodine 1 1

Swabs, Iodine 2 1

Tape, Adhesive 1 2

Tape, Adhesive 2 1

Tape, Duct 1,2 2

Thermometer 1 3

Thermometer 2 2

Tool, Multi Plers 1,2 2

Toothbrush 1,2 8

Tweezer 1 1

Tweezer 2 1

Warmer,Chemical 1,2,3,4 4

Water,Aqua Blox 1,2,3,4 48

Whistle, Black 2 1

Whistle, Orange 1 1

Wire, .032 1 1

Wrap, Stretch 1 1

Wrap, Stretch 2 1

 

Remember I said to keep it simple. Yes, I have guns, and ammo, and this and that, but while there is much survival value in the other equipment / supplies I have prepared, they are not part of my bug out bags.

*************************************************

A few specifics for you to think about:

1. Anything you need from these bags, you are likely to need quickly. A big MRE is not hard to see, but where is that safety pin? Try to pack components in a transparent container. I used several zippered clear plastic bags from the draperies my wife bought-they were almost perfect for this use- soft,water resistant, clear, and very sturdy.

2. Be sure and vary your gear as much as possible. All my bags (except empty Bag 5) have a knife, but each knife is different, to give us the very best selection of options. For example a raft knife with multiple fold out tools, a drop point hunting knife, large folding knife with a marlon spike on it, swiss army knife, and or leatherman style tools.

3. Notice the bright orange stocking hat. There is one (or more) in every bag in my family group. Not for warmth, although they help with that too, but to help the old man (me) keep tabs on where my people are. Also could help find little ones if they wander off in a crowd. Crowds are all too likely at first, until you can distance yourself from population groups.

4. Part of my gear is relatively old technology. In reviewing this inventory you can probably see some ways to improve. Right off I see that the D cell battery stuff needs to go away. LED stuff will let me drop quite a bit of weight from the total.

5. Two of my bags have manual siphon hoses for obtaining gasoline. Invaluable in my opinion, even if you are on foot now…that may change.

6. Probably the most important feature of my bags is water. I use AquaBlox brand, as they are portable and freezable, and have a 5 year shelf life. As with any water it’s too heavy to carry as much as you would like to. Be sure and include some way to obtain and carry replacement water after your carried water is used up.

******************************************************

 

I truly hope that you consider some of the ideas I have listed here, and if you find them valid, that you incorporate them into your own bug out bag. I certainly will be reading all the submissions and looking for some better ideas for mine.

Semper Fi!

Devildog

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