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SurvivalCache

Good Reads for your survival toolkit

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If you've read any good books, online articles or know of other resources that may be of interest to everyone else, post them here. Also if you have questions about good resources that may help point you in the right direction to get your bug-out-bag put together, learn about using a map and compass or any other subject matter related to survival, post it here. Also in the modern age there are a number of great videos and other multimedia that is very informative so let's not forget those resources as well. Thanks!

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I thought these books are good if your jus geting started into Prepping, even though they are works of fiction. Tunnel in the Sky by Robert A. Heilein. briefly touches, Vests vs. Day Packs, Group Dynamics of Following the Leader, and principles for weapon selection. Hachet by Gary Paulsen. talks about evolving your mind to the situation at hand and what not to do in some situations.

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This past year I've read several good survival fiction and non-fiction books. One Second After by William Forstschen was a real eye opener. It really gets you thinking about just how dependent we are on electricity for our survival and just how bad it might get if the lights go out for more than just a week. Katrina was a good example of just how bad things might get when order break down because people can't communicate. TV, radio, cell phones, we have become so dependent on getting our news and information instantly when that stops, peoples imaginations take over. I read a book a few years back called "The Wizard's First Rule" I forget the author, but the premiss was that the Wizard's First Rule was that people will believe something for two reasons: 1. It's what they want to hear. 2. They are afraid it might be true. In a survival situation people's rationale mind tend to shut down and when it does these two rules very much apply. So when there is no news from the outside because electricity is out, well you get the picture.

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"Hatchet" was the first book I've read cover to cover (Except "Green Eggs and Ham") and I've read it twice, once when I was 9, once when I was 15. And I have too say that it definitely sparks creativity in kids and I would recommend people have there kids read it someday. It also gave me some good ideas about survival and probably was the first thing that influenced me to be a survivalist/prepper/soldier.

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Other good books for getting started are:

 

Encyclopedia of Country Living - Carla Emry

Cookin with Home storage - Peggy Layton and Vicki Tate

The Boy Scout handbook - I recommend the editions from the 1960-1970's

Five Arces and Independance - Maurice G. Kains - This is an old book but a lot of the information is still current today.

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"Mini Farming: Self Suffiency on a 1/4 Acre" by Brett Markham was a good read on growing and raising your own food. Bowyer's Bible series teaches how to make self bows and Ragnar Benson has some good books on about every topic of preparedness and how to improvise.

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Before I say anything else, i am going to let everyone know I am a scifi fanatic. That being said, Robert Heinlein's "Farnhams Freehold" touches on bugging in, and what you could do with a little advanced knowledge. The Council War Series by John Ringo (At least the first two books). He takes a very advanced civilization (teleporters, personal protection fields, nanites, etc.) and thrusts them back into the dark ages, where high tech was the black smith. there is a lot on building a working society from scratch, and developing a means of sustaining yourself, and a community. Also, March up country, March to the Sea, March to the Stars are all pretty good, and involve high tech peoples living in a low tech world. These were written by John Ringo, and David Webber. The benefit is they are all really well written stories, and as such, they can get your mind turning and burning, and give you a break from military manuals which sometimes can be a little blaaaaaaaaaah.

Edited by Mike Uher
spelling

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Mike,

Wow! "Farnham's Freehold"! Had a copy of that back in the 60's when I was a scifi nut. Been so long, I don't remember anything about it though! I'll have to get a copy of it to reread.

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I have just recently started reading a book called "Wilderness Survival For Dummies"...and I must say I'm not much on reading and I have always been a hands on type of guy....but this book is hard to put down when you start reading it....this book is written by John Haslett and Cameron M Smith...you can bet that this book will go into my bug out bag

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If there was only one book that I could take with me, it would be "Back to Basics" by Abigail R Gehring. http://www.amazon.com/Back-Basics-Complete-Traditional-Skills/dp/1602392331/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318377077&sr=1-1 It addresses pretty much EVERYTHING about creating a homestead. Much is relavent to TEOTWAWKI, some is not. Not a detailed anthology on anything, but it touches on just about everything. Just enough info to get you started on pretty much any sort of project.

 

My BOB also contains "The Forager's Harvest" A pretty detailed book on edible plants and where to find them. http://www.amazon.com/Foragers-Harvest-Identifying-Harvesting-Preparing/dp/0976626608/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1318377006&sr=1-1

 

As for fiction. I hate fiction. I can read a textbook on watching grass grow, but cant stay with fiction... But I have read or am reading the following and cant put them down.

 

I have to recommend "Patriots" by James weley Rawles. http://www.amazon.com/Patriots-Surviving-James-Wesley-Rawles/dp/156975599X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1318376880&sr=8-2

 

I am now reading his second book "Survivors". It is pretty good so far.

http://www.amazon.com/Survivors-Collapse-James-Wesley-Rawles/dp/1439172803/ref=pd_sim_b2

Edited by Ready?4What?

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Patriots is pretty good. Brings lots to think about to the fore. I like the fact that he presents a group, and not some individual. I think in that situation, and any other really, having a group is the key. Pool resources, share the work load, have someone to watch your butt while you sleep. I will have to check out survivors. One I forgot to mention, and this is my own personal preference, is "Rifleman Dodd". More military related than anything, but it is a very good story, and illustrates the benefit of discipline, which i believe is almost lore important than general knowledge. And I only say that because you must have it to study, study, study, and do what you really need to, no matter how unpleasant it is, to survive. DISCIPLINE!!!!!

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before the internet goes black find all about Making MMS

 

I do not want to belittle anyone but most people are completely ignorant of how to really survive well

and even with all these GREAT books many real survival techniques are long forgotten.

weave a basket? what for you say, well Indians caught and kept fish alive with them as well as other indigenous peoples weaving and plating are used in making whips and rope.

now even if we do loose power the massive amounts of scrap material will make us way ahead of the game we will never go back to the stone age

we will be better off than people of the 1800's we will just have to work at a slower pace using more man

and animal power but the more basic skills as listed below you know or learn the less difficult you and your children's life will be.

here are some things to find and print while you can and a few things to do with your kids while your

waiting for dooms day.

buy local maps different kinds topo road mines minerals lakes whatever you can find

find all water and mineral resources in walking distance of your home or bug out caves dry creeks types stone and of wild edible vegetation and useful ones like seeds for food oil and grasses to make rope etc.. ask around how deep is your well? nice bird feeder what kind do you see where are all the pipelines junk yards etc. are there bats old animal stalls and where are they CLUE key chemical for preserving meat can be extracted if you know how.

how many edible animals and birds fish and shellfish at what time of year what do they eat where do they find it? practice making traps do not kill with them unless you intend to eat what you kill involve your kids

many traps are live traps done in a box, basket or small cribb design.

 

here is the stuff you need to find and print:

the numerous ways to filter and distill water with or without power and by solar.

how to build solar dehydrators for meat and vegetables

when to plant how, germination temps and options, and other edible grains I like bucket gardens

basic leather working from tandy leather. other books on leather tanning

blacksmithing how to build a forge sail making shipwright wood working joinery

pottery making glass - blowing, candle and soap making, sewing weaving basket making

how to make and extract chemicals from plants and earth for survival and medicines

information on how to build a old dutch wind mill if the dutch would have had the rear end out of a pickup truck they would have died and gone to heaven.... a mini grist mill or a block and tackle rope making braiding temps for making alcohol pasteurizing cooking to prevent sickness disease

how to use a fulcrum make a deadman cantilevers wedges blocks how to use cribbing make pole barns alternate building materials and structures stone cutting how to make paper

how does a fireplace work how to build one a clay oven a smokehouse ? hot or cold smoke

everyone of these converts into something else or a way to build a business a home make money or trade goods

 

Here is a list of books I have found interesting

 

lyman reloading handbook and a lee reloading handbook

Ball home canning older version new is for preppies use new times and pressures though

Back to basics from readers digest

butchering, processing and preservation of meat

putting food by

secrets of the Chinese herbalist

the Merck manual

the doctors book of home remedies

Rodales garden problem solver

hints from Heloise

standard first aid

a new English version and king James version of the Bible

 

where ever you intend to stick it out a good book on local edible plants with good pictures

books on trapping animals how to make and set snares, dead falls, box and stake traps.

a good book on medications as the nursing drug handbook

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I have picked up some interesting tips in the Foxfire Books (I have the first two, looking for more). Howard Garrett's Texas Organic Gardening is another good non-fiction source and title says it all. I have several of the books noted by Snake and I add a big thumbs up. If you are looking for fiction, World Made by Hand is an interesting post-Peak Oil novel.

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a couple of ones i have found interesting are not necessarily books but a collection of articles. one is called the lds preparation manual. it is a collection of articles on everything to food storage, survival in different environments etc etc. i would say its more of a before the shtf read than an after. you can download it online for free or pm me and i can send you a copy. another interesting collection was put out by survivalblog.net a while back. it was a dvd called ITEOTWAKI and i feel fine. i dont know if he is offering it any more but it is basically a collection of the best info he has found all combined into one work. i dont know what the legal ramifications are of sharing this since i paid for the download but im sure something can be worked out.

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I completely forgot about the firefox books I got the first one I like it, I was told the rest

if your a country boy are redundant.

 

I would advise a hoyle book on card game rules if I did not mention it before

 

some good game stock is half dozen pair of dice for yatzee and other games

a couple decks of quality coated cards,

you can find survival cards on different subjects here are a few links.

http://www.campingsurvival.com/playingcards.html

http://www.urbansurvivalplayingcards.com/

http://www.amazon.com/Sea-to-Sky-A124-Wilderness/dp/B001EVKQKS

 

and dominoes.

 

solitaire has killed plenty of hours waiting for trains planes and ships.

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I would add a book on the Disassembly/reassembly of firearms. You may know how to maintain your tools, but if you come across a tool while scrounging, it'd be nice if you had an idea if it was going to field strip in 3 parts or 50. JMO

 

There are "Tech Books" by Haynes or Chilton for vehicle repair also. These aren't vehicle specific (which I recommend for your vehicles), but they cover systems used in every vehicle, i.e., A/C, steering and chasis, engine performance, OBD codes, brakes, electrical, etc.

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I would add a book on the Disassembly/reassembly of firearms. You may know how to maintain your tools, but if you come across a tool while scrounging, it'd be nice if you had an idea if it was going to field strip in 3 parts or 50. JMO

 

There are "Tech Books" by Haynes or Chilton for vehicle repair also. These aren't vehicle specific (which I recommend for your vehicles), but they cover systems used in every vehicle, i.e., A/C, steering and chasis, engine performance, OBD codes, brakes, electrical, etc.

 

working in a shop we had every manual and magazine that had assembly instructions and even on those you had done a hundred times once and a while you get that blank glazed look and have to ask or get the manual.

 

a Ruger MK I,II,III, it never seems to get any easier LOL they are either easy or a pain I cannot tell you how many

people brought them in a box or how many times I have had to set one down and walk away

Dr frankenruger has made it simple for 50 bucks you do not have to suffer any more.

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