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William Tell

Shelters

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yeah it does fit us all but there are a couple missing from the pics of them lying side by side my oldest and youngest daughters and myself but it does fit us all cozily which is why we are going to buy the 12'X20'

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Warrior I never put down your tent those heavy canvas expedition tents are awesome they are a little heavy but they do work great, I think your talking to navyvet

 

Ha.. thats more like a mobile home. I guess it just my interpretation of a 'tent' being something easily carried on your back.

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Not in Alaska, I have my backpacking tents that I use a CAT catalitic propane heater in but the Alaknak is not bad for the size the 12'X12'X10'3" at the peak weighs 62lbs or a little heavier than a bag of feed corn

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My great grandparents weathered North Dakota winters in a sod house. Native Americans built adobe shelters. When technology fails, look at your feet. Nature gives us everything we really need.

 

True, it is amazing just how good soil is as an insulator. Just ask every burrowing animal around.

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I think azatty and Capt. Bart are on to something. As humans we seem to tend to complicate matters. Animal dens and such offer the correct pattern if you will just think about them. Make them small and dig them into the ground. You don't need a mansion to sleep in and only on the very worst of days are you going to have to stay in your den. The mountain men built cabins but they were by our standards tiny huts. The smaller the place is the better it holds the heat of your body and the less it takes to get it warm.

 

You need to think of your accommodations as a SERIES of separate spaces with each designed for a specific use. For sleeping in the cold weather and sheltering from a blizard you want it small and under the ground as much as possible. A soddy was usually built into the side of a hill if possible.

 

Do NOT attach your kitchen to your other accommodations! Kitchens with thached or wood shingle ceilings and roofs burn down too often to chance losing your stores and other supplies. During the summer you will need a porch and or brush arbor to provide shade and maybe a little protection from rain but don't want to be enclosed.

 

A true wilderness home will be a little like a camp out. You will not want your latrine to be too close. Your kitchen needs to be well away from your other structures. Your cold weather den needs to be tiny and as much as possible protected from heat loss. Your living space will be out in the open for most of the time and those needs will vary according to the season and weather.

 

What we will all have to work hard to relearn and then remember is that without modern power and resources it is WE that will have to adapt to the environment and not the environment that we adapt. We tend to just expect and accept that we can change our environment and this just isn't the way it has been through most of the human experience.

 

When it is cold we turn on the heat. When it is hot we turn on the AC, when it is dark we flip the light switch. Without the modern powers YOU will have to adapt. When it is cold you need to den up and sleep. When it is hot you sleep outside under the stars. When it is dark you sleep and when the sun comes up you get up with it. Light requires resources that people will have to work for.

 

This isn't something that changed way back when people lived in caves. My family was farm raised and this is what they did before WW2. You slept on the porch or in the yard during the summers and during the winters you all slept in one room together. Even when I was a kid there was a big sleeping porch where I slept most of the time in the summer. When it was truly to cold to go out everyone was in that one room...usually the country kitchen. Only after WW2 when the power lines started moving into the rural areas did this change.

 

Think LITTLE and forget the lifestyle we have now. If you can do this you will not just survive, you will prosper! The old days were not bad at all really. I got a taste of it when I was a kid. You sat out in the dark under the stars and talked or sang. The old folks told their stories and the kids played. When it was mid day we gathered under the trees and worked on things like shelling peas, grinding corn for the critters and eating together. It seemed like there were not too many lunches that didn't involve some laughter and play. My Daddy would just out of the blue pour a glass of ice water down the back of my Mama's neck or throw it on me and the water war was on!

 

We were happy people. We made our own pleasures and in general lacked for nothing that we NEEDED. My Dad used to tell me that the drawers his Mom made out of flour sacks were a lot softer than the bought shorts he wore now. The only thing that made the new drawers better was elastic waist bands versus a draw string. You can be happy or not. It is more your decision than your situation.

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Good stuff D,

Needs vs. Desires

Desires usually come from a form of jealousy/greed. Greed from Covetous thoughts. THen comes Judgement from peers. We accumulate 'things' in many ways to avoid this type of jugement. (Keeping up wit the Jones')

If the playing field is leveled (literally) and eveyone is forced to resort to such measures once again, like wearing homemade sack pants is common then perhaps future generations wont be so judgemental of one another. Coveting less, less jealousy and greed making them better people ?

 

just a thought

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Danm already mentioned a couple of things that you'd need here in the south...

 

Here the big enemy wasn't the cold, it was the heat.

 

The 'dog trot' cabin was one response. It was a log cabin with two sections and an open passage between them. One side was for sleeping the other was the kitchen, screened sleeping porches were there for a reason, as were 12' ceilings with a transom window near the top.

 

How many remember catching fireflys and putting them in mason jars?

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