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William Tell

Shelters

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Ok guys, I know there are ALOT of threads on shelters, and alot of them will keep you warm in the fall and early winter. But I have a question about shelters in FULL on winter. I mean like blizzards, heavy snow-fall and severe winds. In my part of the country, its not uncommon to get 50+ mph winds and gusts, especially during winter.

 

So are there any shelters anyone can recommend to endure the severe winds? I dont know if a simple lean-to or leaf-dome shelter would cut it, since the wind will blow alot of the insulating material away.

 

The only idea I could think of is building a really robust cabin or something. Something partially in ground to minimize the impact the wind will have on it.

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William, if in winter and you have it to spare, you can put a light coating of water over the debris and this will freeze and the ice will help not only keep your debris in place but forms a better wind proofing. You can also lash another framework over the debris to help hold it in place. The only other ways would be to use a reed like material to weave mats to use or be able to use large sheets of bark to form a "wickiup".

 

If you have rocks nearby and in abundance, you can build a rock cabin using "survival mud" for mortar and then you'd only have to worry about using a tarp or debris for the roof. Other options would be to study the weather patterns in your area and try and establish your campsite using the natural terrain to help shelter you from the winds or building your shelter utilizing natural shelters like caves or overhangs if feasible and safely done.

If you want a very sturdy and portable item and it will be multipurpose; talk to Tinderwolf about making you a paracord net (hammock) that you can stretch over the shelter and tie down to help hold your insulation in place. These are but a couple ideas based on general specs and you will have to adjust to your specific locale. Look into the shelters used by the Native Americans in your area for great natural shelters, they survived all weather conditions.

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William, if in winter and you have it to spare, you can put a light coating of water over the debris and this will freeze and the ice will help not only keep your debris in place but forms a better wind proofing. You can also lash another framework over the debris to help hold it in place. The only other ways would be to use a reed like material to weave mats to use or be able to use large sheets of bark to form a "wickiup".

 

If you have rocks nearby and in abundance, you can build a rock cabin using "survival mud" for mortar and then you'd only have to worry about using a tarp or debris for the roof. Other options would be to study the weather patterns in your area and try and establish your campsite using the natural terrain to help shelter you from the winds or building your shelter utilizing natural shelters like caves or overhangs if feasible and safely done.

If you want a very sturdy and portable item and it will be multipurpose; talk to Tinderwolf about making you a paracord net (hammock) that you can stretch over the shelter and tie down to help hold your insulation in place. These are but a couple ideas based on general specs and you will have to adjust to your specific locale. Look into the shelters used by the Native Americans in your area for great natural shelters, they survived all weather conditions.

 

Hey thanks Reg! My part of the country we dont have much trees (high altitude dessert = hot summers and fuggin freezing ass 40 below 0 Winters!) But we do have Rocks and mountains in abundance! Thanks again for the tips.

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if your looking for a transportable durable shelter for the family that will stand up to these conditions and allows for an arctic stove Cabela's Alaknak is top notch it will withstand 70 mile an hour winds and 2.75 feet of snow and it is very roomy the down side is financial at $799.00 for the 12'X12, $980 for the 12'X20' which has 2 stove jacks and $1100 for the 13'X27' also with two stove jacks. I will personally vouch for this tent though and it handles the weather in Alaska with no problems so far.

Edited by warrior7r

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warrior7r is spot on with his recommendation. The stoves are a must!

 

Personally, I am partial to an airplane so I can easily travel to where there are swaying grass skirts! :rolleyes:

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warrior7r is spot on with his recommendation. The stoves are a must!

 

Personally, I am partial to an airplane so I can easily travel to where there are swaying grass skirts! :rolleyes:

 

LOL.... I can see that as being a good BOL Rod.

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I have pictures and a short video of mine with five of my kids and my wife in it I am on leave so maybe I will have time to post it this evening also you can do like I did check Cabela"s bargain cave I was able to purchase mine for $335.94 the only thing wrong with it was a 2" rip in one of the screens.

Edited by warrior7r

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When I was a kid we had mini versions of the arm Quonset huts that were used for animal shelter as I remember they were hell.....where's the link

 

http://www.port-a-hut.com/livestock-shelters.cfm

 

If you look this come in many sizes for the smaller sizes if you considered them your roof and use log or stone for the walls they would be cheap and very effective shelters for all seasons, get a larger one and cover it with dirt, leaf,litter etc and it would be artic warm with a small stove

 

The link to pasture farrowing is a really interesting look at sustainable hog farming

Edited by DonDon

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Here is another "golden oldie" from the sticks that makes a good cheap shelter as they can be bought cheap if you move them ( they come apart in rings made of curved tin. i have actually Spent the night in one of these before as a kid we just started a fire on the floor and opened the top as I remember it worked pretty well.

 

http://www.gmlsindustries.com/bins/index.php

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Dondon

My Alaknak stayed at 67 degrees F while the outside temp was -52 in a 30 mph wind using A Hunter multifuel Arctic Stove I wouldn't exactly call that sucking I thought it was great. I told my kids it was the best thing since sliced bread on of the most comfortable X-treme cold weather camping experiences of my life.

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For some reason the vid will not attach this was taken Sept 2011 when we first got the Alaknak in place of the Arctic stove is a propane stove Note all the ventalation on the sides beneath the windows, in the peak and under the Awning that is not including the windows also in the picture the vestibule is not attached that adds another 43 square feet of floor space seven people in sleeping bags will only take up half of this 12'X12' tent we are going to buy the 12'X20' come tax season I will try to make another Video This weekend and see if a different Camera format helps. [ATTACH=CONFIG]1453[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]1454[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]1455[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]1456[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]1457[/ATTACH]

Edited by warrior7r

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[ATTACH=CONFIG]1468[/ATTACH] I am sorry they are side ways I down loaded them from my phone and no matter what I do it keeps uploading them sideways. Also the guy in the last pics is me for size reference I am 70" or 5' 10" for the record

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Dondon

My Alaknak stayed at 67 degrees F while the outside temp was -52 in a 30 mph wind using A Hunter multifuel Arctic Stove I wouldn't exactly call that sucking I thought it was great. I told my kids it was the best thing since sliced bread on of the most comfortable X-treme cold weather camping experiences of my life.

 

Warrior I never put down your tent those heavy canvas expedition tents are awesome they are a little heavy but they do work great, I think your talking to navyvet

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