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Rod

Dutch Ovens

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One of the challenges I have been wrestling with is being able to bake and roast without using energy that can't be replaced. You know, gas, propane, etc. I have two wood burning stoves and a propane oven. I was looking into replacing one of my wood burning stoves with a wood burning cookstove. A rather pricy choice.

 

I was showing a couple of them to my wife and she suggested using a dutch oven. Slap my forehead and call me a weenie! I have used Dutch ovens extensively for Boy Scouts. Why it didn't occur to me to use them on the wood stove could only be attributed to the early onset of Alzheimer's! :confused:

 

There are great methods for baking, boiling, stews, roasting, and frying. I picked up a nice one at WalMart for under $40. I plan on trying out baking some bread this coming weekend on top of my wood stove. My mouth is watering already! :rolleyes:

Edited by Rod

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One of the challenges I have been wrestling with is being able to bake and roast without using energy that can't be replaced. You know, gas, propane, etc. I have two wood burning stoves and a propane oven. I was looking into replacing one of my wood burning stoves with a woood burning cookstove. A rather pricy choice.

 

I was showing a couple of them to my wife and she suggested using a dutch oven. Slap my forehead and call me a weenie! I have used Dutch ovens extensively for Boy Scouts. Why it didn't occur to me to use them on the wood stove could only be attributed to the early onset of Alzheimer's! :confused:

 

There are great methods for baking, boiling, stews, roasting, and frying. I picked up a nice one at WalMart for under $40. I plan on trying out baking some bread this coming weekend on top of my wood stove. My mouth is watering already! :rolleyes:

 

Can't get to your forehead but you, sir, are a WEENIE! I aim to please.:P

 

We have a couple of Dutch ovens and I love those things. I really LOVE apple pies baked in a Dutch Oven!:D

 

As a response to your problem, look into solar ovens as well. Again, we have a couple. Great food, good bread, roast, rice etc.

Edited by Capt Bart
am to aim

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We bought ours:

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?hl=en&client=firefox-a&hs=YD7&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&q=solar+oven&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.r_qf.&biw=1173&bih=728&um=1&ie=UTF-8&cid=5086838777109218605&sa=X&ei=nlVsUIzfMcWRqwG83oHICA&ved=0CG8Q8wIwBQ

 

Not inexpensive but well made and works very well. There are also plenty of plans out there if you Google "solar oven".

 

Another selling point is that it keeps the kitchen cool in the summer and reduces the amount of work for the cook.

 

I hope this helps.

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Hell I thought a Dutch oven was when you pull the cover over your wife's head after farting in bed...........no seriously I'll be here all week, please tip your waitress,

 

I have thought about doing something like a "wood fired pizza oven" in the back yard these should be fairly cheap and easy to build, several plans come to mind.

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A decent "fire pit" for a Dutch Oven is the LARGE ceramic pots used for small trees and such. Fill them about half full of sand or rock to make a fire proof base, build your fire in the middle of it and then place your oven on it.

 

Oh, I have the lid lifter from Bass Pro shops and we like it.

 

 

Makes it a lot easier to lift out of the ceramic fire pit when the lid is covered with coals.

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Hell I thought a Dutch oven was when you pull the cover over your wife's head after farting in bed...........no seriously I'll be here all week, please tip your waitress,

 

THAT is a good one! :o

 

I just live for these little moments!

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A pretty decent cookbook for people interested in learning more ideas for dutch oven and campfire cooking is here:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Cooking-National-Museum-Service-History/dp/1586857614/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1350018897&sr=8-6&keywords=forest+service+cookbook

 

It's part history book and part recipe book, all about the tradition of camp cooking done by those with the Forest Service over the past 100+ years. From the description: "Dedicated ranger's wives prepared meals with limited resources as they accompanied their husbands in the field, often supplementing cooking with k-rations cooked over an open fire. In rustic and remote locations, delicious, time-tested creations were prepared and served, including Dutch Oven Beer Bread, Parmesan Mashed Potatoes, Pioneer Night Stew, and Creamy Pumpkin Pie."

 

I originally bought a copy of it for my grandma, who worked for the Forest Service when she was younger. She really enjoyed it and tried a few recipes - with good results - while camping last summer. So I bought a copy for myself! LOL

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We use Dutch ovens a lot, winter and summer. Winter takes a bit longer is all in our climate.(no.Utah)

I have been trying to perfect my desserts, but everyone eats them too fast. I do like roasting brisket, pork loin, turkey breast(bone in), as well as roasts and chicken. I tried making spaghetti once on a boy scout outing, came put more like glutinous "something", but it did taste like spaghetti.

Have finally (I think) perfected using skillets and cast iron gills on wood coals, takes some doing, and it AIN'T like charcoal!(learned the hard way several times) Have been teaching the grand kids some "how to" using cast iron, the oldest two (10 8) are getting pretty good. I also never "thought" using cast iron was "survival" cooking. Then again, someone once told me, "going camping is practicing to be homeless". Pretty much...

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My only real tips are to make sure that it's evenly heated (coals above and below) and that it's properly seasoned before you try cooking anything. Oh, and people will be really impressed if you make pineapple upside down cake while camping, but they become far less impressed if you can't actually get it out of the pan (two things to remember: lightly grease your dutch oven to prevent sticking, and let it cool for several minutes before gently prying it out).

 

That said, I can point you in the direction of one of the ugliest websites I've ever seen, that happens to have an abundance of good info about dutch ovens:

http://www.dutchovendude.com/default.shtml

 

Here's another site you might find helpful:

http://dutchovennet.com/#

 

Have fun and let us know what recipes you like!

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Thanks, OC. That is a good looking cookbook. I'll check and see if my bride wants it.

 

I hope she does! It's actually a pretty fun read, with lots of pictures (including some interesting cooking set-ups in the camps) and a fair amount of trivia and history. And if you love breakfast foods as much as I do, it really has a lot of yummy ideas to try.

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Thought I'd revisit this because I found a great link:

http://www.survivalcommonsense.com/dutch-oven-survival-kitfeed/

 

There's a video called The Dutch Oven Survival Kit, which is done by a guy who uses his dutch oven for camping while hunting elk every year. This is meant as a how-to guide for people just getting started with these.

 

Here's another guide, this one to choosing the right dutch oven for your needs:

http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/05/choosing-seasoning-and-caring-for-your-dutch-oven.html

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a standard cast iron skillet with a disk blade the right size slightly larger { I have seen them welded up and used as a wok}

 

any way put your lid on the food your biscuits on the lid and the disk on top or cool biscuits first in the pan take and place in a

pan with lid to keep warm and cook your meal I like squirrel seared and then cover with water let simmer / boil for 45 min

the meat should be tender water should be reduced add flour and make gravy if a lot of water cold water and flour mixed will be without lumps if juice is mostly oil from frying /searing just drop in flour brown and then add water some powdered milk makes it creamier.

 

I like a SS pot cast iron pan both with lids stainless bowl with lid and a stainless cup you can cook a cake in a cast iron frying pan with a lid or tortillas fried bread pan cakes or potato, corn fritters whatever canned ham or spam works in place of bacon or ham

a bit sweet but hey it lasts in the can till you need it that night put it in the beans and that way you do not waste any.

 

these new can openers that cut the edge of the lid are great save the lid and replace and bungee it keep till the next meal

 

I still like salt pork keep it in a muslin bag wrapped well lasts quite a while.

cannot find dry smoked and salted bacon or you could keep it in a sack too everything now is injected with wet brine.

salt beef was good just needed to soak it a couple of times and dump the excess salt like salted fish.

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