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101matt

Reloading/NewBEE

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before you purchase any components, pick up a reloading manual such as Lyman, Lee, Speer, Hornady etc.

Get an idea for the type of load you want to load. Pickup what ever primers the book recommends for that load. Just make sure they are the right size/type for the caliber - ie. small pistol for 9mm and large pistol for 45 acp. For powders, I try to go for spherical powders as they tend to meter more consistantly and drop better from my powder drop.

 

For me, I dont load 9 but for 45 I pretty much only use Winchester Large Pistol (9mm would be small pistol) primers anymore. For powders, Winchester 231 or Bullseye are good starting points. Im currently using Universal.

 

Reloading is a great hobby. My loads are much better than any factory load ive ever bought. And I buy once fired brass all the time.

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Ditto on 231 and bulls eye, AND A RELOADING MANUAL!!!

I routinely get between 10-12 reloads on my 9mm brass and 45acp brass, so it makes practice economical!

Do not scrimp on quality bullets, some are crap, most are pretty decent.Winchester 231 out of a snub nosed revolver will get the revolver dirty quickly.

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Matt,

I'll give you the short version - Remember that you are playing with things that go "BOOM"! When you are reloading that is THE ONLY THING you are doing! No food, no drink, no pets, no TV and NO INTERRUPTIONS! If you get interrupted, then you need to start over on any incomplete reloads. The risk of double charging a round and blowing up a gun is just too great to let it happen.

 

NEVER reload over a carpet; any dust that falls run a risk of being set off by a vacuum cleaner and your "CFO" will not be pleased!

 

Be very careful with the cast your own slugs part. You are dealing with hot, poisonous materials. All the caveats about well ventilated areas and appropriate splash/spill protection for your eyes/skin/floor/walls/etc. apply.

 

Be well read before you start, it will save you a lot of heartburn, not to mention skin burns/new carpets/angry CFO/etc.

 

A fun thing to do but be a little paranoid; it is much safer that way.

 

Just my not so humble opinion.

Edited by Capt Bart

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twolf,

I like the hand loader for the buffalo rifle rounds. It is another touch with history - that's the way guys like Billy Dixon did it.

 

Matt,

remember that mission sets the design. If you're planning on big, tough game you need a FMJ solid core. If you've got a tube magazine, you must have flat noses and accept the loss of performance. If you're doing varmint work, get the lightest slug you can.

 

Points and boat tails decelerate less over distance than flat points and non-tapered tails. You get more energy at range with the proper shape. The Hornedy Leverevolution impacts a couple of inches higher at 200 yards than a flat tip out of my .30-30. It is all about ballistics before and after the round hits the target.

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Thanks for the information..

I just found a .300 savage lever/pawn shop..$350.00 with scope..model 99..

 

its in good shape..But the ammo is so high priced..Yes I like the lever and it still a 30 cal.and the price is right/compared to a new .308 pump at $650.00..ok so im looking .lol

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Matt,

I read somewhere a while back that some Glocks (others?) don't like pure lead slugs. Fouls the rifling or something and I can't find the reference quickly. I'm sorry I can't find it but what ever you set up, try out a couple of boxes as soon as possible to make sure your weapons like what you've made.

 

Also, remember that automatics may different on what they like to digest. A revolver will shoot what ever you can load into the thing. An auto may not like flat tips or certain weight or ?

 

I guess the moral is make a few, try them and if they don't work well, change what you are putting together.

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Matt,

kind of a side bar thought: you might consider getting a box of factory bullets for your first reloads. That way you know the round shape/weight/jacket is correct. When you find a load that both you and your gun like, then you can cast your own rounds. If there is a problem, you know it is the casting, not the load. It would be frustrating to try to work out a load problem when the culprit is a casting problem.

 

Just a thought but I'm somewhat simple minded and like to tackle problems one at a time if possible.

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Thanks..Reg5 and I have been talking also..

 

I will start with the common factory bullets first...CFO said too..lol..

me melting lead has her a bit uncomfortable..

 

I totaly agree,taking it slow and learn basic first..I just want to have the ability to be able too if need be!

 

:o

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Autos are real often persnickety critters about what you feed them. They are designed to work with specific pressures and bullets and when you reload for them you need to load for that specific weapon. You don't have the latitude when loading for Autos that you do with revolvers. No light loads and no really hot stuff; they thrive on mediocrity and consistency.

 

They don't like dirty burning powders and will just get asinine about bullet shapes. The thing is that autos are all about volume shooting and if you mess with their ammo very much you lose this. My auto loading is always aimed at a certain pressure with bullets that will not cause an interruption in my fire. Jams and misfires make a auto almost useless. You want it to go EVERYTIME you pull the trigger. I don't like lead bullets for auto loaders for this reason. They will not always be uniform. They will lead your barrel and sometimes smear making the loading ramp rough.

 

An auto is all about defence. A revolver will do this just not as well. On the other hand the revolver will do things that the auto isn't very good for. My 357 mag loads run from ultra light loads that are little stronger than a pelet gun through 1400+ fps loads that will take deer. The same loads also work in my Winchester and that 1400fps goes up to 1750 fps or so out of the rifle.

 

I usually loaded round nose hollow points or ball in my autos. You also need to watch your case length when loading autos because they seat on the front of the case rim. Revolvers couldn't care less as long as your dies are set for longer stretched cases.

 

When loading for an auto it is all about how well that reload functions in a specific weapon. Never bet your life on a reload that wasn't made for your weapon without giving them a good test run.

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Danm,

well said, sir. An auto is something of a challenge to reload for and it is critical it work first time, every time. I always use factory ammo for self defense purposes for both legal and functional reasons. Good points.

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