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William Tell

Smoke reduction

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So I know there are a few threads already similar, if not the same as this one. But Just thought I would throw this out there, Pine cones. They make a great kindling and also double as a smoke trap. The way they are shaped sucks the smoke into the cone and makes it dissipate at the fires elevation instead of floating up into the air.

 

Just a lesson from the good old days (lol "old days" I'm 22, don't think I really have the right to say that yet) that came screaming back when I thought about the last campfire I got to actually sit around. =P

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So I know there are a few threads already similar, if not the same as this one. But Just thought I would throw this out there, Pine cones. They make a great kindling and also double as a smoke trap. The way they are shaped sucks the smoke into the cone and makes it dissipate at the fires elevation instead of floating up into the air.

 

Just a lesson from the good old days (lol "old days" I'm 22, don't think I really have the right to say that yet) that came screaming back when I thought about the last campfire I got to actually sit around. =P

Well old man, I will have to try that trick.

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Tell,

I have GRAND KIDS as old as you! Young wipper snapper:p

 

Thanks for the post, sir. Those ideas are valuable. Another is to build your fire under a tree's canopy. Far enough away from the trunk not to bother the tree but close enough in so that the leaves spread the smoke out.

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Tell,

I have GRAND KIDS as old as you! Young wipper snapper:p

 

Thanks for the post, sir. Those ideas are valuable. Another is to build your fire under a tree's canopy. Far enough away from the trunk not to bother the tree but close enough in so that the leaves spread the smoke out.

 

Thanks capt. I like that idea. Next time i go camping, im going to try that out. Also it helps to make a small, hot fire, instead of a big "white mans fire". Drives me nuts when i see people with a fire that could almost be considered a bon fire. And then they cant figure out why they are getting smoked out and their food tastes like ash.

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Thanks capt. I like that idea. Next time i go camping, im going to try that out. Also it helps to make a small, hot fire, instead of a big "white mans fire". Drives me nuts when i see people with a fire that could almost be considered a bon fire. And then they cant figure out why they are getting smoked out and their food tastes like ash.

 

Tell,

based on the name and the "white man's fire" concept I leap to the conclusion that you are at least familiar with Louis L'Amour's classics, especially the Sackett stories. If I'm not, I'd recommend them - to everyone actually. They contain a lot of solid survival hints, especially for the desert southwest.

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Thanks Capt! Ill have to check into those. Grand parents were forest rangers and preferred the small fires, and taught the tricks to me, called anything even made by the boyscouts (like the Teepee frame fire) a white man's fire. And as for william tell... Well... Lets just say I have a Longbow and want to learn to shoot it well, haha.

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Start fire in low spot, gully, wash, ditch, but not river, stream or the like that are large open areas without tree canopy this also helps hide the light from your fire, as well as give better wind break for you and your fire........of course a disclaimer on the occupation of low lying areas during heavy rains due to the increased risk to personal safety caused by flash flooding will not be needed here......right?

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Start fire in low spot, gully, wash, ditch, but not river, stream or the like that are large open areas without tree canopy this also helps hide the light from your fire, as well as give better wind break for you and your fire........of course a disclaimer on the occupation of low lying areas during heavy rains due to the increased risk to personal safety caused by flash flooding will not be needed here......right?

 

You mean those nice pebble covered places with no vegetation at the mouth of the little gulley coming our of the mountain is NOT a good place to camp??? Who KNEW?:P

 

Yeah, every year I was in Phoenix we'd lose some city folks who camped at the exit to some gully. It never occurred to those folks that it could be raining MILES away and they'd still get a flash flood. Not their faults, I guess but, gee, you should do your research before entering new areas. Mother Nature is NOT your friend!

 

The Dakota Fire pit is another good one

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/

 

The Swedish Candle is another excellent system. I've used this in a backyard cook out and it works great!

 

 

http://www.bushcraftstuff.com/tutorials/the-swedish-candle/

 

It smokes some at first but then almost none and it gets HOT! As an aside, 12 hours later it still had coals hot enough to rekindle a fire so the candle does take some care to be sure it is OUT before you leave it.

Edited by Capt Bart

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You mean those nice pebble covered places with no vegetation at the mouth of the little gulley coming our of the mountain is NOT a good place to camp??? Who KNEW?:P

 

Yeah, every year I was in Phoenix we'd lose some city folks who camped at the exit to some gully. It never occurred to those folks that it could be raining MILES away and they'd still get a flash flood. Not their faults, I guess but, gee, you should do your research before entering new areas. Mother Nature is NOT your friend!

 

The Dakota Fire pit is another good one

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/

 

The Swedish Candle is another excellent system. I've used this in a backyard cook out and it works great!

 

 

http://www.bushcraftstuff.com/tutorials/the-swedish-candle/

 

It smokes some at first but then almost none and it gets HOT! As an aside, 12 hours later it still had coals hot enough to rekindle a fire so the candle does take some care to be sure it is OUT before you leave it.

 

I tried making one of those a few weeks back. I think I must have used too tall of a log, because that fire got BIG quick. But it was also pretty windy (about 45 mph gusts, and probably about 15-20 consistent.) and that could have been a part of it too. Ended up catching the whole thing on fire, not just the insides....

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Tell,

Hmmmm, could have been the wind, it was much calmer than that on mine. We didn't have any such problems with ours. I only did two cuts, not three, but who knows. I'll have to pay more attention to the wind next time.

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You mean those nice pebble covered places with no vegetation at the mouth of the little gulley coming our of the mountain is NOT a good place to camp??? Who KNEW?:P

 

Yeah, every year I was in Phoenix we'd lose some city folks who camped at the exit to some gully. It never occurred to those folks that it could be raining MILES away and they'd still get a flash flood. Not their faults, I guess but, gee, you should do your research before entering new areas. Mother Nature is NOT your friend!

 

The Dakota Fire pit is another good one

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/

 

The Swedish Candle is another excellent system. I've used this in a backyard cook out and it works great!

 

 

http://www.bushcraftstuff.com/tutorials/the-swedish-candle/

 

It smokes some at first but then almost none and it gets HOT! As an aside, 12 hours later it still had coals hot enough to rekindle a fire so the candle does take some care to be sure it is OUT before you leave it.

 

My uncle used to do something like the Swedish candle but smaller and wider with the bases of large trunks about 36" tall 24" wide split once all the way and packed with smaller branches and a little soak of kerosine or diesel , and I've heard of using something like your talking about to remove stumps

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Damn...even when I light my farts on fire it doesn't give off that much smoke...just stinks up the whole f-ing place. Great for keeping bears and badgers away though!

 

The best way to do that is in a tub of water. It concentrates it into large bubbles which are a very pretty green color when set on fire! However, be careful of blow-back! I had a friend that couldn't not sit for a couple of weeks because he lost a couple layers of skin! Last time he and his wife did that while drinking beer in the bathtub! :o

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Capt Bart mentioned the Dakota fire pit. I have used it several times. Works very well. I do use stones at the bottom to increase heat. I have thought of using heavy duty aluminum foil around lower part of the pit as well. The intense heat cuts down the smoke signature greatly. Here's a second link to building one.

http://survivial-training.wonderhowto.com/how-to/build-hide-campfire-from-your-enemies-dakota-fire-pit-0116303/

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