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Dangerwolfe

Fall/Winter Gardens....what the locals do in my neighborhood

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Hi Folks,

 

I've mentioned before that the French in my area are big gardeners. Perhaps 1/3 to 1/2 of the full-time residents in my neighborhood have some kind of year-round vegetable garden, fruit trees, chickens, goats, rabbits, quail or all the above. The old-timers go crabbing/fishing at the beach all the time and invited me, but I haven't taken them up on it yet.....

 

In any case, here are some snaps I took a couple days back of an average garden; some are more elaborate, some less like mine (but getting there), many folks plant from seeds but not always. Hope it give some ideas:

 

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There are also entire fields of plots nearby that people own/rent to grow food on.

 

Wolfe

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That's very cool! Thanks for sharing. Also: you should totally go crabbing with the locals. I love doing that here on the Oregon coast - mostly because it's even less stressful and more social than fishing. LOL And are there clams or mussels nearby? That's also worth learning about, even though it's harder work to harvest clams - there's nothing like fresh steamed ones, or breaded and fried ones, or the various soups (especially chowder) you can make with them!

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That's very cool! Thanks for sharing. Also: you should totally go crabbing with the locals. I love doing that here on the Oregon coast - mostly because it's even less stressful and more social than fishing. LOL And are there clams or mussels nearby? That's also worth learning about, even though it's harder work to harvest clams - there's nothing like fresh steamed ones, or breaded and fried ones, or the various soups (especially chowder) you can make with them![/quote

 

Yes, tons of clams, mussels and OYSTERS of course that grow in the estuary where the river dumps into the ocean. The local restaurants go out and collect them....... The locals enjoy a specialty called "moules frites" (mussels and fries) which is also very good.

 

It's a rough life here, LOL!

 

Bien cordialement,

 

Wolfe

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That's very cool! Thanks for sharing. Also: you should totally go crabbing with the locals. I love doing that here on the Oregon coast - mostly because it's even less stressful and more social than fishing. LOL And are there clams or mussels nearby? That's also worth learning about, even though it's harder work to harvest clams - there's nothing like fresh steamed ones, or breaded and fried ones, or the various soups (especially chowder) you can make with them![/quote

 

Yes, tons of clams, mussels and OYSTERS of course that grow in the estuary where the river dumps into the ocean. The local restaurants go out and collect them....... The locals enjoy a specialty called "moules frites" (mussels and fries) which is also very good.

 

It's a rough life here, LOL!

 

Bien cordialement,

 

Wolfe

 

Hey! Watch who your calling "Bien cordialement"! :rolleyes:

 

Thanks for the photos. Sure are nice gardens!

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One question - what are the red cylinders and what are they by/under?

 

Hi Nana,

 

Those red cylinders are plastic Badoit bottles (see link for the picture) and they are under tomato plants. You should be able to zoom the picture for a better look:

 

http://www.journaldunet.com/economie/face-a-face/badoit-san-pellegrino/1-marche.shtml

 

It can get a bit dry here during the summer and the natural top soil can also be somewhat sandy/clay due to the fact the ocean is so close and some of the neighborhood was formerly dunes. Often the dry soil will not readily absorb water and it will roll off unless a trench or depression is made around the plant.

 

Therefore, in order to drastically ease the chore of watering, the locals cut off the bottom of these plastic bottle and use them as funnels at the plant base, conserving water and insuring it goes right to the roots of the plant. Just fill each one up and your done!

 

The locals also use clear plastic bottles with the top cut off as mini-green houses during spring placing one over each seedling. It insures the plant never dries out while it's getting started and protects it from the late frosts.

 

I will watch my French LOL!

 

Cheers,

 

Wolfe

Edited by Dangerwolfe

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