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who is currenty reading what?

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ive been reading from this site (link below) and find it cool. found the link from a post on here actually. i like the page the link brings up too. some good stuff on there.

aside from the web im currenty reading the revised SAS book. (john wisemng) good read

for those looking for a book to read and reread lol. a must have for the pack.

i also have mykle hawks manual as well. WILL NOT be caught in the woods or the weeds w/o that book.

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Emergency- this book will save your life

Neil Strauss

 

I've read that Sonoran6, a little to much on the rambleing side for me. Yet if I start something, I'm going to see it through. I would not mind to be sitting at one of those bars on St Kitts when it's 10* this winter. Hehehe

 

Another good read is "Lights Out". Also someone mentioned "One Second After" as being a good one. That's my next library book.

I've not been to the city to hit Barnes and Noble since then. Did I say how much I hate going to the city.

Hmmmm, I got someone who's very close to me a Nook. I think maybe I might borrow that. :rolleyes:

Edited by desert rat

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I just finished one second after about although ago and it was great. That is the book that really had me convinced I'm doing and starting towards the right path for my family and I. Reading SAS as well right now and flying throug it. I rink my next wil be a book I've seen many of the guys on here talk about before called patriots.

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Reading the dragon series by G.A. Aiken because it's flat-out hilarious. Just finished Collapse! You're On Your Own and Bugging Out to Nowhere, which are both pretty interesting takes on TEOTWAWKI with some useful prepping ideas included.

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just bought a book on pruning trees---i gotta slow down! i'm outa control!, lol, i've read the the first 6 terry goodkind books---very good reads, also years ago i was reading turledove's 'stainless steel rat' series those were good too

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OK, I'll play but you got to promise not to laugh! I'm going through Plutarch's lives and the Code of Hammurabi. Interesting reading in there; this was common reading for the folks or the 18th and 19th centuries. It is good to see where some of American's founding fathers got their ideas on government.

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Capt. Bart, that is why you are an anchor here. I haven't hit Plutarch since college.

 

OC, I liked both of those books for the thought that went into them, and now I have to go research hoop houses. I hope there is a sequel to Bugging Out to Nowhere. That thing about the monitors on the National Guardsmen was really chilling, and clever.

 

Harry Turtledove is a great writer when he is doing alternate history, but he really sucks at writing disaster fiction. If you don't believe me, do check out his book about the Yellowstone eruption. Almost couldn't finish it.

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We actually read the Code of Hammurabi in one of my high school classes and touched on it again in a couple of my college courses (my classes were heavy in political science and philosophy). It's actually available for free through the Avalon project at Yale:

http://avalon.law.yale.edu/subject_menus/hammenu.asp

 

Sun Tzu's Art of War is also a must-read, IMO. He really walks you through strategy, tactics, and leadership, and it's applicable to survival, sure, but also to everyday life. Free reading with notes/interpretation here:

http://suntzusaid.com/

 

I also would add Machiavelli's The Prince to anyone's reading list. He gets a bad rap for some of the advice he offers in this work, because it sounds like he advocates a lot of scheming and ruthlessness, but he really advises for moderation, planning, and a willingness to carry out a promise or threat that has been made. It's also interesting to note that while this work is all about how a new prince could succeed (written in the hopes of gaining favor from said new prince), Machiavelli himself believed that a republic was a better form of government. Read The Prince here:

http://www.constitution.org/mac/prince00.htm

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While reading the Hunger Games I became deeply fascinated with its fantasy world. The thing that drew me in is that I could see America following a similar path in the future. ._.

 

It does make "reality" shows and the disparity between the poor and the rich seem so much more ominous, doesn't it? And you can see how little rules we take for granted now - like that there are seasons where hunting is allowed/not allowed, or that vendors need to be properly registered to sell on the streets - could be warped to ensure that people are thoroughly dependent on the government for all food and other supplies, etc.

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While reading the Hunger Games I became deeply fascinated with its fantasy world. The thing that drew me in is that I could see America following a similar path in the future. ._.

 

 

i love this kind of stuff. Harry Potterish type stuff too. i want to see this movie.

ive heard mixed reviews on it.

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i love this kind of stuff. Harry Potterish type stuff too. i want to see this movie.

ive heard mixed reviews on it.

 

My wife liked it but said they differentiated from the book where they didn't need to. (?) I haven't read the book(s) nor watched the film yet. I know we have the entire series in book form, but not sure if she bought the movie yet.

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Let's see.... I'm working on the following titles:

 

For pleasure:

 

The Story. http://www.amazon.com/The-Story-Zondervan/dp/0310936985

 

For graduate school:

 

Pathophysiology: The Biologic Base of Disease in Adults and Children

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0323065848/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i00

Pharmacotherapeutics for Advanced Practice

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1451111975/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i02

Advanced Practice Nursing: An Integrative Approach

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1416043926/ref=oh_details_o06_s00_i01

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OC,

Sun Tzu is really good but you have to be careful. Too slavish a devotion to some of his concepts helped to lead the Japanese astray in WW2. Good strategy in his work but I prefer Von Clausewitz and Rommel for tactics. I know way too many empty suits who think they are 'warriors' because they've read Sun Tzu! Too bad they didn't understand the spirit of what he wrote.

 

You are also right, The Prince belongs on anyone's list. It lays out fairly plainly the duty of the leader. Everybody wants the name of being a 'bad man' or a 'leader' but they don't understand, nor do they want to shoulder the burdens that come with command. The 'lonely at the top' jokes aren't funny to anyone who has been at the top.

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Capt Bart, I think a slavish devotion to any one line of thought can lead to problems. A certain amount of flexibility would serve any of us well. I haven't read Rommel of Von Clausewitz, so now I'm going to have to add them to my Kindle "to buy" list. Thanks for the recommendations!

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