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nobody

How's your ammo supply?

How much ammo do you have on hand?  

34 members have voted

  1. 1. How much ammo do you have on hand?

    • More than 10,000 rounds
      10
    • More than 5,000 rounds
      7
    • More than 1,000 rounds
      12
    • Less than 1,000
      5


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The real answer is you can never have enough of three things..water...food..and AMMO.

 

TWolf,

there is an old pilot's saying that the only time you can have too much fuel is if you're on fire. Similar feelings about ammo - if you have a fire or are swimming a river, well, maybe you CAN have too much ammo. The amount of ammo you need depends on your concept of TEOTWAWKI, the duration, and whether or not you are expecting open, many-on-many combat or mostly hunting with a slight chance of "lite" (only lite if you're not actually involved) combat ops.

 

I have numbers, based on caliber, that trigger a purchase to bring me up to my full complement. For what it's worth, I think Rawles spends too much energy and time on 'combat' ops. I know folks who disagree but I figure if we don't have some supply lines established within a year or so, we'll be back in the 19th century for a really long time. That's my scenario; your scenario may be very different so you have to choose.

 

Just my not so humble opinion.

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Would one of the reloaders here explain to me the benefit of it? You still have to have all the parts, firing cap, shell casing, bullet, and gun powder. I buy mine all put together, standardized, and easy to store. If you load your own you have the makings for a lot of bullets, and i Have a lot of bullets. It can't be the price, I have looked into it and if you shop smart(shop s-mart) then it is actually cheaper to buy ammo.

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Would one of the reloaders here explain to me the benefit of it? You still have to have all the parts, firing cap, shell casing, bullet, and gun powder. I buy mine all put together, standardized, and easy to store. If you load your own you have the makings for a lot of bullets, and i Have a lot of bullets. It can't be the price, I have looked into it and if you shop smart(shop s-mart) then it is actually cheaper to buy ammo.

nobody,

the advantages toreloading are really quite simple

1. Ability to tailor your load for a specific firearm or purpose

2. A brick of 1000 primers store alot easier that a 1000 rounds of 308.

3. Theropy, stress management, or just plain fun.

4. Price? Just as in shopping smart for ready rolls, bargain hunting for components can be just as rewarding.

5. With a minimum of prep and the knowledge of such things; you now have a marketable skill within your group.

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nobody,

the advantages toreloading are really quite simple

1. Ability to tailor your load for a specific firearm or purpose

2. A brick of 1000 primers store alot easier that a 1000 rounds of 308.

3. Theropy, stress management, or just plain fun.

4. Price? Just as in shopping smart for ready rolls, bargain hunting for components can be just as rewarding.

 

 

5. I totaly agree.With a minimum of prep and the knowledge of such things; you now have a marketable skill within your group.

 

Wisdom right there!!!!Straydog...its about skills...

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All good points. I have considered getting into it. What would a basic loader cost? I have a stock of powder for...uh...stuff, and even have 200 270 bullets i picked up in a package deal at an auction.

In addition to the 270 bullets i have quite a few "odd ball" ammo's for the same reason. Could i salvage the powder and primers from those?

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All good points. I have considered getting into it. What would a basic loader cost? I have a stock of powder for...uh...stuff, and even have 200 270 bullets i picked up in a package deal at an auction.

In addition to the 270 bullets i have quite a few "odd ball" ammo's for the same reason. Could i salvage the powder and primers from those?

hop over to the reloading subforum. great info over there

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All good points. I have considered getting into it. What would a basic loader cost? I have a stock of powder for...uh...stuff, and even have 200 270 bullets i picked up in a package deal at an auction.

In addition to the 270 bullets i have quite a few "odd ball" ammo's for the same reason. Could i salvage the powder and primers from those?

 

I have lee loaders and I have press and all the tools but if you go cheap

 

a Lee loader here are the links to rifle and pistol all in one kit do it all by hand produces as good ammo

as factory made.

 

http://leeprecision.com/reloading-kits/lee-loader-pistol/

 

http://leeprecision.com/reloading-kits/lee-loader-rifle/

 

here are a few optional tools I would have on hand

 

http://leeprecision.com/powder-handling/lee-safety-powder-scale/

 

http://leeprecision.com/powder-measure-kit.html

 

http://leeprecision.com/case-conditioning-tools/

 

of course you need good manuals

 

http://leeprecision.com/modern-reloading-2nd-ed.html

 

http://www.midwayusa.com/Product/217655/lyman-reloading-handbook-49th-edition-reloading-manual-softcover

 

as far as powder for rifle BLC2, Hodgdon H4198, Hodgdon H4895

 

for pistol Bullseye, Unique, 2400

 

If I only had 2 I could afford it would be Unique and BLC2

Unique loads reduced power rifle load with cast lead bullets shotgun loads and pistol

 

7000 grains =1 pound divide your load into 7000 and you will know how much you need

and how many primers to have on hand.

 

casting bullets is as easy as pie Lee bullet molds are fantastic

you should have one for each caliber you have IMO

and I only use Lee bullet lube cleanest and best I have found water

soluble dries fast I have used it with gas checks and paper patch.

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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Snake is right on the money. Lee loading equipment is a great "cost effective" way to get into reloading. My personal choice where my bang for the buck is concerned. I have an old Lee press given to me by my father that I now use for depriming and some sizing only. It served me well for many years. I purchased a Lee Challenger "Breechlock" kit 4 or 5 years ago and it is great. I have buds with the progressive sets that produce rounds faster, but I perfer to go the "one at a time" method. I have molds for my pistol calibers but only have one rifle mold for 30WCF. Reloading is definiately a good investment in preparedness. Start slow and simple.

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