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awake

Going Primative.

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I bought a book on native american weapons years ago because I have an interest in history. The book is called " Making Native American Hunting, Fighting, And Survival Tools" by Monte Burch. The book covers flint knapping, arrows, bows, hunting/warfare. I havent made anything from it yet but its an interesting book. Hope it helps someone

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Shawn, You may also like some books written by David Wright on this subject. He has written 1 on Mountainman Skills and Crafts and 1 on Native Skills and Crafts. I'll take a look at the ones I have and post the titles and authors when I get home (traveled out of state for work the past couple weeks). They offer some good step by step directions and even some trivial things that most books seem to skip.

David Wright practices the skills and offers some really good first hand experience from his work in "practical archealogy" (he does re-enacting in the mountainman/colonial American time period).

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Shawn, I'll have to wait til the kids wake up and will go grab you the titles (library is next to their rooms). I know David Wright and Mark A Baker are 2 of my favorite authors on this subject. You can also look at Scurlock Publishing for alot of titles.

I am also checking my digital "card catalog" for what I have...lol. I have been trying to make a listing of all my books so I can remember who has borrowed what...lol. Many are just the Title, sorry, no author listed.

 

Firearms, Traps and Tools of the Mountainman

Deerskins Into Buckskins

Crafts and Skills of the Mountainman by David Wright (complete series of crafts and skills on Homesteading, Native American, Pioneers, Farming, Cabin Building, etc. not all done by David Wright)

American Indian Crafts

Through Native Eyes- a Reader's Digest Collection

Beginner's Guide To Beadwork

Books of Buckskinning Vol 1-6 from Scurlock Publishing

 

Ok, I'll grab the others and post them as well when I wake the kids up.....lol. They would probably sleep all day if allowed to. You can also look at my references/reading list at the bottom of the Looking to Our Past articles on the main SC site. I listed alot of the books and sites there as well.

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http://www.survivalcache.com/forums/showthread.php?1667-Cherokee-Publishing

 

 

Shawn, This is a thread in the multi media section that may offer you some other resources for books. I'm heading down to go thru mine now; kids finally rolled out of bed....lol. You have to love a 100# dog that jumps in bed with them when asked "where's the kids?"

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I read through these threads and noticed that nobody mentioned the sling (like david killed goliath with), I have been messing around with several that I made this year. A sling takes up very little space so it's perfect for a bob and all you need for ammo is a properly shaped and sized rock. They are kind of tough to get the hang of but they are a lot of fun, I have made mine out of paracord and some leather from some welding chaps that I had from my former profession. You would be amazed at the range you can get out of a sling and with regular practice it's not all that hard to get accurate with one it just takes some time. Everything I have read says that within 2 weeks you should be able to hit a human sized object at 50 yards, now that's practicing every day for a couple hours I don't have that much time on hand nor do I have a place very close to practice at a 30 min drive is my nearest place with a good number of proper rocks. I personally have 2 slings in my bob one large one smaller. A little known fact about the sling one of the romans most feared weapons was the sling they would take control of high ground and hurl football shaped hunks of lead at there enemies and cause very serious damage. In my opinion the sling is about the most efficient weapon there is all you need for ammo is a rock.

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Another primitive weapon or style of making weapons is flint knapping, I personally think a lot of people are over looking this. I did see Shawn mention a book he has about this, I think this is an essential survival tool what happens when you loose your knife? You need to be able to make a blade of some sort, a lot of people don't realize that flint knapping is more than just making arrow heads. This is truly an art and kind of tough to get the hang of I have been doing it for several months now, I am not amazing at it or anything like that but my smart ass buddy didn't think one of my knives was sharp so he tested it on his knee and laid it right open probably could have used a couple stitches. I saw a program a couple years back on the discovery channel about flint knapping and they said that a properly knapped knife or arrow head will actually be sharper than a surgeons scalpel, the edge can be as thin as two molecules thick. When you get one of these pieces you know it you can actually see through it and it will cut through just about anything like a hot knife through butter.

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There are a few threads on slings and slingshots and there is a thread dedicated to flintknapping. There are actual surgical instruments made of flint.

Knapped arrowheads, spearheads, knives, axes, etc were the tools that allowed the Natives to survive and in some instances really thrive, long before metal options were available to them. I think the metal arrowheads and such just added endurance to the tools and the biggest reason was convenience. They were being paid to trap/hunt the animals and the less time they took making a natural tool instead of buying one, was less time they had in the field harvesting furs and meat for the European immigrants. Even in the slower pace of Colonial America, time was money.

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Shawn, Sorry for the late reply. I have the Books of Buckskinning Vols 1-6. Altho not completely Native American, they will fall into your history genre. Allen Eckert (sp) has a complete series on the Native Americans and American Frontiersmen. They don't give step by step how to's for anything specific but they do offer a look at many skills (even no description is given) that were used by the woodsman to survive. Native American Survival Skills by W Ben Hunt.

The Practicing Primitive book by Steven Watts; I don't have this one yet but I've heard alot of great reviews for it. I'm missing a couple I know I have, so either they have been packed away or already been moved to my BOL. I've been taking alot of books there lately since they will be too heavy to pack if I have to walk.

Again, sorry for the late reply.

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I posted a thread titled "Living History" that has alot of links for early America that I visit.

 

Here is a site with alot of primary source documents (journals, ledgers, manifests, diaries, etc) from history that has been digitized and placed online for free reading. It probably won't give instructions, but from a historical perspective, you can find the tools and goods that were bought or in demand, problems faced, etc from our early Pioneers, businesses, etc.

 

http://www.americanjourneys.org/

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ok I know I'm talking firearms in the wrong post ......but Iv'e been hanging around you guys too long and am now a hi-jacker....Just a thought here,couldn't a modern rifle be altered to become a black powder easily? Last ditch choice of course.

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Pig, I resemble that hijacker remark...lol

 

Some of the lever actions in the old west calibers, 44/40, 45 Colt, 32/20, etc can be loaded with black power. As for the AR and my guess is any of the other semi's, it would foul out and I wouldn't risk the difference in chamber pressures. I know there was a thread in the Articles forum about this and some People much more knowledgeable than me chimed in on this very topic.

Also, if you are looking for a way to make a modern rifle long term, you'd still need primers. If you truly want a big bore survival rifle in case of long term, get a flint lock. You can use the flint lock to hunt with easily and conserve your centerfire or even rim fire ammo for self defense or emergency hunting situations.

Wish I could be of more help on this.

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