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tinderwolf

What's in your vehicle?

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Looks pretty good so far, here is my list, Due to the fact I commute 225 miles aday from West Texas to DFW, I carry a bit more on my truck

2 Liters of water

2 MRE's

duct tape

electrical tape

jumper cables

Road flares

matches

shovel

Geber Saw/Knife Combo

Bolt cutters......you never know??

gloves

First Aid

flashlight

tow chain

thermal blankets

12 x 12 tarp

rain gear

Vehicle specific tools

2 spare headlight bulbs

5 gal of fuel

and 2 spare tires

$200.00 in Five Dollar Bills

and I always have my sidearm,and a long gun!

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I highly recommend getting a 4x4 pick up with tool box and stocking it with the following:

Water (2 Gallons) 5 is better

Jerky, Power bars, etc.

Motor Oil -don't waste valuable space with winshield fluid

Funnel

Good Hand Axe

Shovel

Survival Knife

Headlamp

Gloves

Blanket or Sleeping Bag

Crowbar

Jumper Cables

5 gal Gas/Diesel Jerry Can with Fuel

Paracord

Duct Tape

Extra belts, spark plugs, etc.

Spare Tire

Rags

Maps

your everyday bag should cover all the other essentials.

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One problem I have with keeping water in my jeep is that for quite a few months of the year it freezes overnight, any of you run into this? do you still keep water in the vehicle and if so how do you keep it from freezing and busting the bottle? I just added a small pry bar to my supplies.

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I haven't found a way around the freezing, but the botttled water you can buy at Costco seems to hold up pretty well. I haven't had any break but I try to put new bottles in every month or so and use the ones that have been freeezing and thawing. Since a case of the bottled water is $4 I'm not out much if one does break. Its probably not the most ideal solution but its the best I could come up with, there are days I would forget my head if it wasn't firmly attached to my body, so no way I would remember to put in water everyday and grab it back out of the car every night.

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I've read where we aren't supposed to keep the clear plastic water bottles in cars, because the sun's heating of the plastic releases carcinogens into the water. Same goes for micro waiving foods in plastic containers. I realize that if we're facing a TEOTWAWKI scenario that doesn't matter so much, but I wanted to throw that out there for those doing it now.

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I've read where we aren't supposed to keep the clear plastic water bottles in cars, because the sun's heating of the plastic releases carcinogens into the water. Same goes for micro waiving foods in plastic containers. I realize that if we're facing a TEOTWAWKI scenario that doesn't matter so much, but I wanted to throw that out there for those doing it now.

 

ive heard the same. anybody know if there is truth to this?

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Freezing is a concern for me too, but because I live in the southeast the bigger issue is protecting my BOV items from extreme heat. It's not uncommon for my gear to be exposed to 3 months of 90+ degree temps. Any suggestions on how to keep things cool? Have a hatchback vehicle so I don't have the protection of a trunk. Experimented with wrapping a few things in roll-out reflective insulation (like you use in an attic) but it ended up cooking them, not providing a heat barrier. So much for being clever....

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Just added a tool box to the back of the jeep to keep all my crap in, for some reason I was just letting it all lay around back there.......

 

good idea. it helps keep everything where ya can find it. try wrapping you water in a towel. or, open the water and pour out about 1/12th of a cup so the water bottle has room to expand when it starts to freeze.

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I sound like a broken record and that is because I depended on liquid bleach, stored in all my vehicles, home and retreat as primary chemical puriification of water in emergency situation for years and felt perfectly prepared. You can imagine my suprise when it was pointed out (by my 89 year old grandmonther) not to leave it too long or it would be no good. After checking (just search clorox bleach) I found that the longest - the longest - that bleach remains good is 8 months to a year, less that than that in a high temp environment (like the trunk of a car). While bleach is utilized in many water systerms for purification it is all done with liguid belach that is replaced frequently. The only way to store bleach for use 'down the road' is in one of the powder or tablet forms. After much research I have decided on Calcium Hypochlorite in the form of pool shok. And it is even more specific than that - most of the CH you find in wal-mart, Lowes or Home Depot (at least in my part of Texas) is only 48 - 52 % CH per content and while that will work it takes much more of it and is normally mixed in with additives (such as anti fungals) that are not something you want to consume. I finally settled on POOLIFE TURBOSHOCK SHOCK TREATMENT. It is 78% and has no additives that are dangerous. What you actually do is use it to mix up a batch of your own 'bleach' and then use that to purify you water source. Keep in mind that it loses it punch rather rapidly, so don't make too much. The good news is it is cheap and goes a long, long way - a 1 pound bag will treat up to 10,000 (ten thousand) gallons of water. CAUTION; this stuff must be treated with respect. When it get together with mositure it can be very corresive and release dangerous gases. It will eat its way through any kind of metal so you want to store it in plastic or glass (with plactic lid). The last I got was less than $4 a pound and is not only a great method for chemicallly treating you drinking water but if you mix it more strongly it is an excellent cleaning/sterilizion agent. On top of that it would make a excellent barter item. The three inch tablets that come in the plastic buckets would also probably work, but becasue they are compacted it would take longer to dissolve and although I have looked I have not found the formula to utilitze it. I am intentionally NOT including the formula I have found so that those of you interested will see all the warnings that are given for handling and storing this product when you research it further. Help spread the word - I cringe to think of how many people have gallons of bleach stuck back, counting on that to purifiy their water and will only find a strange smelling liquid when they need if to purify their water.

Edited by mactex

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I, too, travel long distances in TX - not everyday, but often enough where i don't want to load and unload my 'Peace of mind' each time. I carry a basic BOB (or GHB, if you prefer) along with basically everything Old Hog has. However. since the legislation has changed here I always carry a Moss 88, M1 carbine, AR7, 22/45, and M92(Ammo for all),[firearms secured in hidden compartment in bottom of trunk - can be found, but take a while and even longer to open w/o combo. Except Moss - it is on top. easy to reach], cell phone w/ charger plus extra back-up battery that holds charge, as well as 2 tarps, dome tent, 2 sleeping bags/rolls, self inflating mattress, rain gear, single burner stove (which will also burn on unleaded), sterno/stove (low signature), cooking equipment, weeks worth of rations (plus dehyrated coffee, hard candies, 5 lb rice, Tang, oatmeal) , BK-2, BK-7, Cold Steel SRK, SOG Spec Elite 1, 100 feet paracord, duct tape, gorillia tape, zip ties, basic fishing set-up, 2 unopened pints of vodka, a case bottled water, 2 one gallon conatiners water (for me or vehicle if needed), full first aid kit ('first aid' being the key phrase), 2 weeks personal medication, exrta clothing(season approprate), foot gear, goggles, gloves, sunglasses toilet paper, insectiside, FRS radios, litium batterys (last longer, not effected by heat/cold), Headlamps, 2 pair close/2 pair distance flashlights (LED), solar battery charger (AA/AAA), 12 each AA/AAA rechargable, Kerosene lantern(gt. fuel & wicks), led lantern, binos, flairs, gerber collapsable saw kit, short axe, Kaytadyn Vario filter, steripen, chlorine tablets, military canteen/cup, 5 gallon collapsible water jug, 5 gallon gas can (empty), standard auto stuff: Jump cables, tow rope, shovel, tire inflator, fix-a-flat, spare fluids, 4-way lug wrench. To keep up with the world, if I am forced to leave my car I carry a Red Cross AM/FM/WEATHER solar/crank/battery radio. A copy of the Boy Scout manual, SAS field book, the Bible, playing cards, maps of all area travelled. The last item is a two wheeled collapsible game cart so that I can move what I can away from roadway, if required for safety, and to utilize to begin the trek homeward if the situation allows it. I keep 20 of the large, 3 mil thick industiral trash bags in the event I have to cache any of my supplies and have the opportunity to do so. Overkill? Most certainly, Lose 1-2 MPG? Without a doubt. Ever once, for a single moment, regret having it? Nope. When I was twelve years old my father (career military) and my family were transfered to West Germany - 6 months after the Berlin Wall went up. I was the oldest male in the family and certain responsibilites went along with that, and that was when I first started what we now call prepping. Keep what you can, you can always throw it away or trade it if you can't carry it. You can get home with the roads closed from 10 -15 miles, maybe, 200 - 300 calls for a different approach and possibly having to make home where you find it for thethe time being. Good luck and try to learn something new everyday - it will keep you young!

 

Please overlook the longwindedness of a old blowhard and neophyte computer conversationalist.

user.

Edited by mactex

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Keep this behind the seat of my regular cab truck:

 

small tool kit with some wire and connectors

bag of pull straps, ratchet straps, bungees, cargo net, rope, tow rope, zip ties

leather-man tool

duct tap (gotta have duct tape)

backpack -- a good GHB w/ seasonal clothes, 1st aid, meds, and spare contact lenses

maps of area and surrounding counties/states

.45

pouch of Red Man

gloves and a skull cap

 

as always the few odds and ends that are continuing to be added

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http://www.lowes.com/pd_26668-66601-86001_0__?productId=1076397&Ntt=wrap+it+emergency+tape&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl__0__s%3FNtt%3Dwrap%2Bit%2Bemergency%2Btape&facetInfo=

I keep some of this stuff around now because it is great. its a little pricey but works very well. Its like electrical tape but much better. I used it to seal a small hole in my shotty soddering job when I replaced my water heater. Over the week i had to wait to continue the work on the heater the tape held the leak back enough that it didn't even fill a cooking pan halfway up.

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So this morning I had my own little shtf moment and started thinking about the gear in my vehicle and my preparedness. It wasn't local catastrophie or maylay, trans went out w/out much warning on the way to work and as fate would have it's way w/ me, I got hurt while getting the vehicle to a safe location. All in all everything worked out and got the truck to the shop but I started to think:

 

Situation:

It's o dark 30, below 40 degrees, 5 miles from nearest service, coyote's and dogs are a very real concern, and cell reception is minimal at best. I started thinking; I am hurt but still mobile by my own means but now definately slowed down. If had to I start to huff it, my truck may be burglerized and I can't take all this stuff w/ me. Got a GHB and pistol but only 20 rounds of ammo (not alot but better than 1 clip). I am in a rual area and folks round here won't be very receptive to "some guy" knockin at thier door in the wee morning hours. And I would say most of the local residents, like myself, would answer the door with a firearm.

 

It was alot to take in and process before coffee this morning.

 

Hope my little experience may help you get better mentally and gear prepared.

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I carry the following in my GHB behind the seat

 

-Gerber multitool

-small bic lighter

-firesteel

-vaseline coated cotton balls

 

Main pocket

-Source 70oz hydration bladder

-potable aqua tablets

-small nesting Coleman 2pc cook set with

-4 cliff bars

-10 tea bags

-spork

-4 oatmeal packets

-2 hot chocolate packets

-paracord 100ft

-trotline cord 262lb braided, 1 roll 143ft

-trash bags 2 50 gallon

-military poncho/tarp

- Grabber space blanket/tarp

-emergency candles (2)

-Stainless steel water bottle

-Coglans tube tent

-Headlamp (rayovac with lithium batteries)

-First aid kit with packets of: sunscreen, bug repellant, sting eze, poison ivy cleaner, cortisone,

Antibiotic

-neosporin

-gauze pads

-vet wrap (1 roll)

-quick clot (1 sponge)

-athletic tape

-ferrocium rod

-Frontier water filter straw

-spare lighter

-snares (7 premade coyote cable snares + 1 roll snare wire+ 30 12” 30lb wire leaders)

-Gerber sport axe 18” hatchet

-SOG field pup knife

-Stihl folding saw

-Smith’s 2 sided diamond sharpener w/ hook groove coarse & fine

-disposable scapel

-compass

-green limbline cord partial roll

-insect repellant (100% deet pen)

-blank CD (signaling)

-Adventure medical bivy sack

-warm nylon/fleece coat

-polypropylene long underwear

-wool socks

 

Also in the truck toolbox or behind the seat are

-seasonal extra work clothes (carhardt bibs & coat, raincoat, etc)

-axe

-shovel

-log chains, tow rope, 2 clevis's

-12V air pump

-jumper cables

-tire repair plug kit

-spare serpentine belt

-fluids (oil, antifreeze, ATF)

-fuel siphoning kit (12V sprayer pump converted to diesel transfer kit)

-wool blanket

-basic tool kit (screwdriver & bit kit, SAE & metric end wrenches, 4 way, pry bars, pliers, socket sets etc)

-flashlight

-lighter & matches

-GPS and power cord

-Atlas

-insect repellant

-baling wire and duck tape

-come-along and hi lift jack

 

I often have a rifle and ammo in the truck also suitable for whatever seasons are open. I have a shorter barrelled NEF 20 gauge & 50 rounds that is always in there. It's a functional, but cheap old beater so it won't be the end of the world if it's ever stolen. I have a CC permit and my pistol is on me any time I leave the ranch.

Edited by catfish hunter
forgot something

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One thing I thought about adding the other day is a flare gun or pen flares or some kind of shootable flare device. I would leave it up front with me, side of the seat , visor whreever it would be most accessible to me from the driver seat in case of a crash. Its winter time and it got me thinking when I pass some rather deep ditches and embankments that if you were to go off one of these at night and the lights to your vehicle weren't working then you would be almost impossible to see. Being hurt or unable to get out of such a environment a flare gun could really be a life saver. Personally I like the idea of those "pen flare" types because they seem like they would be easier to use and conceal, does anybody have any experiance with them and where is the best place to get them, brand,etc?

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First post,

Thanks for all of the great ideas, the one item that I carry that I haven't seen in any if the posts is Rescue tape. It works for bandages, radiator hose leaks, vacuum leaks. It is the best repair item in my go bag!

 

Jimmy

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