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DC Matt

Condo sized Plan and Gear

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Capt Bart, thanks for the advice about the water. Can't agree with you more about the we like of water, though don't have a good story like yours. My co-board member works at an architecture firm and I'll see if he knows anyone that can look into it for us. I would hate to have that thing collapse into someone's unit, especially my friends who live on the top floor. At various projects we've had those escape hoods given to us, but will think about adding those to our fire prep gear.

 

Both Capt and John, that's some good insight about the ladders. I figured they might be awkward to use, but might look at some alternatives. If they go that route, I'll see about setting up some practice time so they know how to operate them. Worse case worse jumping (or doing a hanging fall) is better than getting burnt, but hate to see them (or me) have to do that and break a leg, especially in a SHTF situation.

 

John, that video makes me want to go rappelling, though I haven't done it in about 15 years. As to get home supplies. I do carry some items. Mostly because I'm a gov't contractor and don't have my desk, so got to carry everything. I have a 123 mini quark flashlight, and small Gerber pry bar deal on my keys. usually have a small city pocket knife and bandanna (gets hot walking around DC in a suit) on me as well. In my bag, I have a small ditty bag with minor first aid kit, packets of meds, latex gloves and cpr mask (have advanced wilderness first aid training), and a few odds and ends. In reality, if I got to get home, I can hoof it pretty fast. As y'all have mentioned, the problem arises if their is no home when I get there. I think I'm good to go (mostly) for the get home kit, but I need to fashion something up for my wife. The earthquake we had here really scared her, mostly because she works a few blocks from white house and thought it was a bomb. I think that might be a whole thread in and of it self. All that being said, any suggestions on a pedestrian and city friendly get home kit?

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I think that some dust masks would be helpful, and you may want to consider a gas mask. I'm not trying to be an alarmist, but the the elephant in the room this whole time has been that in a classified addendum to the Internal Response Framework released in 2009, a 10 kiloton Hiroshima sized bomb being detonated in Washington D.C. was considered to be the top threat to national security by the Department of Homeland Security. It sounds like you're pretty close to the white house, so you would probably not be in the initial thermal pulse, but would be incapacitated and terminally irradiated by the blast. If you're a bit further, you do have a chance to bug out with gas masks and potassium iodide. The trick would be a radio tuned to channel 9 (emergency channel) to avoid the fallout cloud, which shouldn't drop for about a half hour anyway. The authorities will probably say that you should stay indoors (think Fukashima), but I doubt that an average building offers much protection; it's up to you to decide. The blast radius is really only a few miles, the last mile not being too badly damaged. So your chances are pretty good if you move fast and are lucky enough to not be in the cross-hairs. Just remember that if batteries are in the radio the EMP will fry it, and to take the potassium iodide (Don't buy Ioidate) in order to fill your thyroid to capacity with clean iodine, bc radioactive iodine particles are released in the blast, which if absorbed into your thyroid means game over. I'm no expert on this, but I'd recommend moving my friend. Be well.

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johndoe1999

 

mainmilitary.com has gas masks and other neat items or cheaperthandirt.com

 

I would get a Israeli mask be careful some look right for the price just remember that 40MM is the common

thread size some countries used 60MM you can buy adapters from mainmilitary but by the time you do all that the Israeli comes out a better deal and fits nato standard filters if you put a sock over the filter it helps keep dust out and lengthens the life.

the cheap Russian pull over mask does not seal well,

they all have their faults some chemicals can dissolve the mask and other limitations some stuff will melt your skin so the mask worked but the patient died.

its a crap shoot i would still have one i worry more about dust storms or diseases a paper mask won't protect

your eyes and air flows around them easy.

a trash can with water and a mild soap and a bit of bleach get nakid' and wash off / decon

and go into your place and your as protected as you can get for our purpose.

if its real bad going out probably is not a good idea...

I would not even answer the door

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Earlier in this tread the idea of catching rain water on the roof was discussed. I came up with something that would work. Stake plastic sheeting to the roof edge with some slack in the middle. If the edge isn't higher then the center then add post for the edges then affix a few rubber coated magnets to the sheeting for weight to create a path of low points leading to the edge. At the edge you can either use gravity or tubing to get the water into what ever your using as a collection barrel. this should keep the amount of water on the roof to a minimum as its constantly draining. The only issue I foresee is wind blowing your tarps. But if your short on space this is a lot of stuff to keep on hand.

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Nice input, as always. Living in DC definitely has its issues. The wife and I do want to head back down south when we can. Right now the jobs keep us here. I've looked now into those potassium iodide pills and they seem like a great idea. Any recommended brands? Snake, thanks for the advice about the masks. Like anything, its worth paying for quality, verses having the clothes or gear break on you and just spending more to replace it. Auto, that's an interesting idea. I'll have to go to the roof these weekend and see if that would work out. But the idea sounds like a good way to keep the weight down on the roof, and sill get the water.

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One VERY important aspect of Bugging In is waste disposal. Many TEOTWAWKI forcasters estimate a HUGE percentage of people will die from disease. This is due to the many possible dead and lack of hygiene (I'm not trying to be gruesome, but in a large scale disaster the death toll would be great, over 1,800 people died in Katrina and it was ONE city and they had forewarning). Flies are your worst enemy as they carry disease. Make sure you have ways to dispose of your waste and keep flies out of your home. Stock up on TP, hand sanitizer, and trash bags plus find a way to get rid of it (burying it works best). Hope that helps.

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Would NOT recommend the MRE toilet paper. The troops are all complaining about it, too thin. Get 2-ply, cut out the interior cardboard, flatten it and put in a zip=lock baggie or better in a vacuum sealed bag. The cardboard inserts make a great firestarter. Keep them with a jar of vaseline and your firestarter.

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Good thoughts of the TP. I do something similar when camping. You can get it pretty compact.

 

Also good call on the waste disposal. I bet that is one of the biggest oversights in most prepper's list. I was looking into something like that for when my wife and I go car camping or go to a festival, etc. Any recommendation's for portable toilets? If we are bugging-in and have enough water, I think we can still use the toilet, but would like a back up for bugging-in and bugging-out via car.

 

Our BOBs do have hand sanitizer and I'm going to put in a small thing of Doctor Bronner's.

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Any recommendation's for portable toilets?

Check out the http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_8?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=luggable+loo&sprefix=Luggable

It is called a "Luggable Lou"; you can buy it at Amazon with or without the bucket it sets on.

If you decide to buy, please go to

http://survivalcache.com/support/

scroll down to where it says

Click Here to Support SurvivalCache by Buying at Amazon.com

and use that route to get you to Amazon. That benefits the site.

The Lou snaps on to a 5 gallon bucket (I would line the bucket with HEAVY duty trash bags) so you actually have a seat. Once done, the bag is taken out and buried. You might consider a bag or two of lime to bury with the waste (enough lime over the top to slightly cover the bag and waste before throwing the dirt over it) just to keep down the various bug and four legged critters that like to play in waste. This is a good idea for folks on "city sanitation" as well. It has the disadvantage of smell in the house but the advantage of no chemicals. Besides, I've never seen a chemical toilet that didn't smell like a, well, chemical outhouse!

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I buy from here http://www.nukepills.com/

 

Another site is http://www.ki4u.com/products1.php . If you haven't looked at the NukAlert detector you might check out http://www.nukalert.com/ . My wife and I have them. Interesting little devices that do a great job as an alert device. Not good enough for a "radiological survey" but good enough to keep me from getting fried. The KI4U site has all sorts of good radiation stuff from very simple to quite expensive. Decent folks to work with.

If you decide on the NukAlert, Amazon has them as well and it you link there from the SC page they get some support from Amazon. About $175 each as I recall.

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I have built a number of bug out bags both large and small. The one thing I decided on

as a multiple use item was a "army" type canteen with the stainless steel liner cup.

This gave me a water carrier, a pouch for disinfectant tablets, a stainless steel container for both drinking or heating water... all in one pouch. I have purchased a number of containers but this just made a lot more sense for bug out

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michael,

 

Good idea about the canteen. I added a metal sierra cup to my bug out bag (since I have the backpacking stove) for the same reason. Also looking at buying one of those collapsible backpacking buckets for water carry/gathering. Saw one at REI yesterday and it looks a lot lighter than I was originally thinking. Also got my Gerber LMF II the other day. Love it so far. Heavier than I thought, but looks like it can take a beating. I'm adding small button compasses to our bags as well. Figured that would be needed for when the phone dies and we need to do some night-time navigation.

 

Last note. Just read this article in the latest Outside Magazine. Its about the US Marines adoption of solar power for some of their combat units to lessen the demand for re-supply. Would love to get my hands on some of those personal use solar panels.

 

http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/natural-intelligence/Natural-Intelligence-Charge.html?page=all

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