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LivingGray

Giant Puffballs

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This afternoon we came across 2 Giant Puffballs - each about the size of a basketball. After we got them home, it took the next 4 hours to get them cleaned, pealed, sliced, fried, and in the freezer. They are excellent, as mushroom steak (cooked on the grill), in soups and casserols, or sauteed and piled on a Venison steak. The 4 hours of prep time was a good practical exercize in food storage, however, it would be a lot faster to just buy some fresh Portabellas.

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There are a few type of mushrooms that I do love to fry up. In a survival situation I would never eat a mushroom just because there are so few that are edible. Plus in a survival situation you are most likely in a stressed mind set, hungry, thirsty, not thinking straight so making the decision of if a mushroom is edilbe is not is not something I would risk.

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Never seen them in Ohio, but then I wasn't looking for them either. Mushrooms are one of those foods from childhood I still don't like; however, in a survival situation I'd eat them like they owed me money!!!

I like them in the appropriate foods, my lady does some good things with them. I just don't trust myself not to poison everybody.

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I like them in the appropriate foods, my lady does some good things with them. I just don't trust myself not to poison everybody.

 

That is kind of my thing too. I absolutely love 'em, but would be more concerned about poisoning my wife on accident. I am sure there is stuff on the internet about which ones etc. Now I will have to go and start looking.

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There are a few type of mushrooms that I do love to fry up. In a survival situation I would never eat a mushroom just because there are so few that are edible. Plus in a survival situation you are most likely in a stressed mind set, hungry, thirsty, not thinking straight so making the decision of if a mushroom is edilbe is not is not something I would risk.

 

 

bingo tinder.

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I like them in the appropriate foods, my lady does some good things with them. I just don't trust myself not to poison everybody.

 

If it becomes necessary, one critical area of knowledge (right near the top of the list - like First Aid)is what, out there is eddible. The best way to learn this is to take one wild plant or animal item at a time and learn about it - is it eddible - if so how is the best way to harvest it, how to prepare it. I have prepared mildweed pods as a vegetable for people and had them ask "What is that delicious vegetable?" When I told them what it was they couldn't believe it.

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They have several field guides on edible mushrooms and other plants. Barnes and Noble have some small laminated "brochures" in the nature section on plants, mushrooms, animal tracks, medicinal plants, mammals, trees, etc which are easily packed, lightweight and informative. I think they are under $5 each. I give them to the younguns when we are going into the woods. I actually have a pouch attached to my MOLLE vest just for these and notebook and pen/pencil. I also mark on my maps the area I find different plants and use a color code for smaller marks and a legend to explain it.

You can get free state maps (most states anyway) at the "Welcome Center" rest areas. I grab ones every time I travel and use them to mark my locations on.

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They have several field guides on edible mushrooms and other plants. Barnes and Noble have some small laminated "brochures" in the nature section on plants, mushrooms, animal tracks, medicinal plants, mammals, trees, etc which are easily packed, lightweight and informative. I think they are under $5 each. I give them to the younguns when we are going into the woods. I actually have a pouch attached to my MOLLE vest just for these and notebook and pen/pencil. I also mark on my maps the area I find different plants and use a color code for smaller marks and a legend to explain it.

You can get free state maps (most states anyway) at the "Welcome Center" rest areas. I grab ones every time I travel and use them to mark my locations on.

 

Regulator - that's excellent.

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Regulator - that's excellent.

 

good thread,i love puff balls.i've never been lucky enough to find 1 that big.i live in IN.just below u..maybe 2hr drive.the 1 from AL.i've eaten brown puff balls,no problem.the only ones i know to watch out for are the ones that look like they have little horns,or sharp warts.they are poisonous.very few mushrooms-puff balls are poisonous.very few are edible by everyone. most are i can eat you cant or you can i cant.learn mussel reflex,if you learn it good it wont fail you when you need it most.

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Guest kevin

i spent 40 bucks on a field guide for mushrooms a few years back. i knew 4 mushrooms i could identify and wanted to add to that. it was 40 bucks well spent. now i know i can FOR SURE identify 3 mushrooms. that may save my life, not from starvation, but from eating something as low in calories and possibly deadly as ALOT of fungi. giant puff balls are one of the 3 i CAN identify, and they are awesome. make sure they have NO gills and are WHITE inside,and your good to go.

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