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lfordiv

Vacation Prep

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Greetings!

 

I'm very new to the forum, but not to trying to be prepared. I am taking my family to San Francisco next month for a vacation. We are flying and I was wondering what items you might think would be good to bring along. If I were driving, it would be no problem, but I'm not sure what I should try to pack in my checked bag.

 

Any and all ideas would be helpful. I do have a large "fanny pack"(for want of a better term) with first aid, flashlight, multi-use tool, cord, survival blankets.

 

I'm from Louisiana so I'm not sure what would be good to have in earthquake country.

 

Thank you!

Edited by lfordiv

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Flashlight, sturdy foot wear, and especially a small pry par in case you get "stuck" in a room or elevator if there is a temblor of significant magnitude. Most of SF proper is in very good condition structurally and should survive a magnitude 6.0 or greater. You are at far greater risk in venturing into neighborhoods you shouldn't be in much less cross through.

Keep your sturdy foot wear, socks, flashlight and small pry bar TOGETHER next to your bed. As a California native we've always chosen to do this and the largest quakes we've personally experienced were only 7.1, and 7.3 respectively a much

better"ride" than any amusement park. There are definite places inside the City/County of San Francisco that can create

instant problems for tourists. Believe me, the locals will KNOW you are tourists by your appearance and your manner.

Be very careful in or around Union Square, and stay OUT of the Tenderloin District. Your hotel should be able to help you with what to avoid locally. Get a rental car, you will be glad you did. Also some great low cost places to go, Fort Point, under the Golden Gate Bridge (SF side), on the Marin County side, head across the GG Bridge to the Marin Headlands National Reserve areas, it's the very first exit off the GG Bridge and it sneaks up on you, WORTH the price of the rental car for the views of the ocean and SF alone.' Pier 39 is a tourist trap-good place to avoid. Hit the Presidio, Golden Gate Park,

Museum of Science and Industry and the Aquarium next door

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First off, I'm not sure a multi-use tool would be allowed on an airline.

Malcolm is right, stay away from fisherman's Wharf unless you want ugly t-shirts. Downtown San Francisco is a great area to explore, lots of good restaurants, shopping for the ladies etc. Do NOT go south of Market Street or into the Tenderloin.

I would recommend taking the 49 mile bus tour and then explore on your own. Agree with Malcolm, you would enjoy the Marin Headlands. Also, from downtown take Clement St. heading west, takes you directly to the ocean.

After visiting Ft. Point ( Civil War Military Museum) go to Baker Beach.

Oh, in SF, always have a light windbreaker with you, the weather will change on a dime!

Now, if you're unfortunate enough to be there during a MAJOR quake, head for the Presidio. It is based on rock, whereas land along inland and downtown is filler and undulates. That's where the fire danger is!!

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Thank you very much!! Thought about the pry bar last night. I have a small one I keep in my car that will fit in my pack. I have taken my muliti-use tool in my checked bag before and it has been no problem.

 

I also appreciate the suggestions of where and where not to go. Same in all big cities. There are parts of New Orleans I would never go to while other parts are great!

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This is something ive been thinking about recently. But for me its quite a bit more complicated. Its ok if your taking a holiday (vacation for most of you over the pond) within your own borders. But what about if your travelling over seas? How do you prepare for that? Case in point would be the british tourists who got caught up in the whole Katrina thing in new orleans.

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A couple of suggestions.

First, carry a whistle on you at all times. I can only 'call' for help until my voice gives out. As long as I have breath I can 'blow' for help once a minute or so. That whistle coming from the other side of a collapsed wall says that there is someone alive here in no uncertain terms.

 

Second, I always carried an 'EVAC-U8' or 'Breath of Life' https://www.forgesurvivalsupply.com/store/nuke-bio--chem-protection/88.html?redirected=1hood. It gives you about 15 minutes of clean air and protects your vision in a toxic/fire scenario. Life saver if you're caught in a plane - most fatalities happen AFTER the aircraft comes to rest during a crash scenario. People die in survivable crashes because they breath toxic fumes or go blind in smoke. Having 15 minutes to "GET OUT!" would make all the difference in the world.

 

I agree with the pocket flashlight (NEVER be without one or more lights). Would also recommend that you buy a BIC lighter as soon as you leave the security area at the airport. (They're cheap and you won't be able to bring it home, most likely, but having fire is GOOD.)

 

Finally, carry some 'pocket food' - granola bars or what ever. Delays in route can be brutal if your hungry.

 

These added to the other suggestions (oh, if you have meds you need, NEVER put them in checked baggage - if you can't carry them on the flight, DO NOT GO! - I've had bags lost on non-stop flights) make a good base.

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This is something ive been thinking about recently. But for me its quite a bit more complicated. Its ok if your taking a holiday (vacation for most of you over the pond) within your own borders. But what about if your travelling over seas? How do you prepare for that? Case in point would be the british tourists who got caught up in the whole Katrina thing in new orleans.

 

This can be tough. When my Brit friend comes to Texas, as soon as he arrives I provide him with a knife and a multi-tool. He can't carry them on the plane and it is foolish to not have them.

 

First aid kits, folders, fire, compass and whistle are all good things to have. My Brit friend was over the Atlantic on 9/11 - interesting story of what happened on the planes and on the ground once they'd landed.

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First off, ...... Do NOT go south of Market Street or into the Tenderloin. ..................

 

Tenderloin, don't know the area but with Sanfransico jokes.......too easy!

 

Looked it up and it does appear to be a sh!t hole.

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