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CarsonCityJay

tips on fire concealment

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I think it is safe to say in any wilderness bug out situation FIRE IS CRUCIAL...

 

But so is concealment

 

Obviousely a small fire is best and avoiding it is probably a good option.

 

Does anyone have any tips on concealing smoke?

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a small fire, being less than 1' in diameter

No plastic, no green vegetation, no flamable chemicals. When scrounging around for firewood, remember that Treated Lumber used for constrcution or fence posts etc. also gives off dark gray or sometimes black smoke.

Just dry tender used sparingly in small amounts, slowly feeding the fire to keep it burning just enuf for heat and cooking. THe smoke given off shouldn't be discolored too much and would be much less contrast against the trees and sky.

Edited by NavyVet_77

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a small fire, being less than 1' in diameter

No plastic, no green vegetation, no flamable chemicals. When scrounging around for firewood, remember that Treated Lumber used for constrcution or fence posts etc. also gives off dark gray or sometimes black smoke.

Just dry tender used sparingly in small amounts, slowly feeding the fire to keep it burning just enuf for heat and cooking. THe smoke given off shouldn't be discolored too much and would be much less contract against the trees and sky.

 

 

good reply sir. i would also suggest this as well as using a dakota fire hole.

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good reply sir. i would also suggest this as well as using a dakota fire hole.

 

Good recommendation. If you're new to prepping you may not know what that is so

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/

has a good explanation.

 

Also, if you can build it in a location where the smoke must rise through a heavy leaf canopy that will also help spread the smoke. Remember at night it isn't the smoke as much as it is the light. In a dark environment a cigarette lighter can be seen for miles, a campfire even further.

 

Finally remember, the SMELL can be as indicative as the smoke or light. Building your cook fire before dark, finishing with it and then moving off a ways for the night adds safety.

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hi all

one thing to consider,is to get fire started in hole,then bury.under 6 in. or more of dirt . with large enough logs,it can burn for days.but this system is only good for cooking,& heat.but is least likely to give away your

hideout.this method was used by the mountain men.not wanting to give away,there hideouts to the indians,

& others that might do them harm.sometimes the temps would drop well below 0 .

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Good recommendation. If you're new to prepping you may not know what that is so

http://survivaltopics.com/the-dakota-fire-hole/

has a good explanation.

 

Also, if you can build it in a location where the smoke must rise through a heavy leaf canopy that will also help spread the smoke. Remember at night it isn't the smoke as much as it is the light. In a dark environment a cigarette lighter can be seen for miles, a campfire even further.

 

Finally remember, the SMELL can be as indicative as the smoke or light. Building your cook fire before dark, finishing with it and then moving off a ways for the night adds safety.

 

Thanks Captain!

 

Never new about this technique! Excellent!

 

Wolfe

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I have a Kifaru paratarp with annex and Kifaru parastove. The stove weighs only 2.5lbs but will heat the tent and hide the light as long as you don't have to hot a fire. You can get it stoked to where the flame comes out of the top of the stovepipe. Doesn't help much on covering the smell, but it can serve the purpose of a Dakota fire hole to cook even without the tent. Their stuff is pricey but extremely well made.

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I just hook up my infrared heater to my propane bottle and wala cannot see it cant smell it either

if your just heating water now cooking in a different story that is why wise packaged meals work.

now you know why I chose propane and I can refill these small bottles with a 30 pound bottle and a

brass refill rig.

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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Lots of good info here..

 

Re: Dakota fire pit... awesome idea on the prairies or flats, but a terrible way to start a large burn in the boreal forest. Just as a buried fire will stay lit for hours, a pit fire can easily ignite adjacent root structures if one is not careful.

 

Ensuring adequate ventilation is key to reducing smoke. The more oxygen a fire has, the more completely or efficiently it can burn, leaving less unburned carbon to rise as smoke.

 

Concealing the evidence of a fire afterwards... cutting a large circle of turf or top soil and setting it aside will provide a great place to start your fire (or dig a Dakota hole,) and the evidence of the fire can be concealed by replacing the turf when finished. This technique has been popular with nomadic cultures for centuries.

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Lots of good info here..

 

Re: Dakota fire pit... awesome idea on the prairies or flats, but a terrible way to start a large burn in the boreal forest. Concealing the evidence of a fire afterwards... cutting a large circle of turf or top soil and setting it aside will provide a great place to start your fire (or dig a Dakota hole,)

 

 

the fire hole is by design for more of a smaller "personal" fire. it was never ment to be used as a big fire source.

 

welcome to the forums.

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The Dakota pit works real well. Also, stock up on heat tabs just in case you are absolutely sure you can't start a fire. Also remember your wind discipline as to where that food smell is going to go.

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For a personal heat fire, shredded white oak bark burning in a shallow pit (very similiar to the dakota I believe) works well. It will produce plenty of heat and has a very low smoke output. The Longhunters used this and then huddled over the pit with their blanket wrapped around them over the fire. It was a trick used by Daniel Boone, Simon Kenton, Simon Girty and several other Americans who learned it from the Cherokee and Shawnee (among others). The idea is to feed just enough fuel to keep coals going and not have large flames. This will keep you warm in subzero conditions and also allows concealment (other than the smell of smoke which is minimal).

Also remember to never look directly into a fire at night, as the BG will have the advantage because you will not be able to focus into the dark. All cooking should be done during daylight hours if possible and then either use the "hot rock" method or buried coals after dark to heat your camp/bed area.

One "trick" for the hot rock method to avoid digging is to sew a sack out of wool or leather (wool is best) to put heated rocks into and then put directly into your bedroll. The wool will insulate you from the rocks and still allow the heat to warm you on the coldest of nights. I understand this (and other ideas) may NOT be the safest, but in survival, some choices are based on necassity and not OSHA. Wool was used by our forefathers because of it's resistance to burning; we, as MODERN Longhunters, have the option of making an inner layer out of nomex and then a wool outer shell to optimize our modern materials into a centuries old survival trick. I recommend looking at "old school" techniques and tricks and then find modern materials that will enhance safety and ease in their application.

JMO on utilizing past survival expert's knowledge and adding a modern perspective to create the BEST practical application when the SHTF.

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The added benefit of the "rock bags" is if a shoulder strap (talk to tinderwolf about a detachable 550 cord one), they can be used as a carry bag for foraging/gathering when not in use as a bed warmer. This makes it a multi purpose piece of gear which helps with ROI (Return On Investment) for the weight you carry.

I humped a 60# bag while deployed, not counting tactical vest, body armor when I couldn't get rid of it, canteens, nor extra ammo above my normal load out if I thought it might get "hot" or exciting (boredom is good in a combat zone). I'm definitely looking to pare down my load to help adjust for my injuries and health.

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Another option (if space and weight allow it) is to make a small stove out of a "3 #" coffee can (or anything similiar). You can add air holes in the bottom and a lid with vents (dampers) (scrapping a charcoal grill for their rotating vents could be easily doable). This won't eliminate the visibility but can reduce the overall glow from a fire and the can will allow you to set a bowl (metal), small pan, etc on it to cook with also.

There have been a few threads dedicated to this type of cooking stove/firebox and any idea can be modified to meet your needs and materials available. There are also commercial stoves available along these lines, I'm just not sure how they would work for "glow reduction".

The coffee can can also be utilized as a makeshift digging tool in a pinch for softer soils, carrying larger pieces of foraged plants, etc. Our most valuable resources are our imagination and willingness to survive an event. With the weight being very minimal, bulky yes, we could even stick one in a child's BOB and they can carry an important piece of gear which helps them feel "needed" and "part of the team". I know my kids like "helping" (other than chores...lol) because they feel "grown up" (the younger ones... teens are a different animal). An empty coffee can is but a few ounces, so even my 5 year old can pack it. While in the BOB, they will also help protect more fragile items packed during transit if nested in the can.

Edited by Regulator5

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Sherrie, Thanks. I am just a cheap ole "bastidge" that prefers finding uses for otherwise discarded items. I'd walk the RR tracks to pick up spikes for use as weight river fishing or head to the junk yard to salvage old lug nuts and such. Then being a history junkie, I get many ideas that helps in my frugalness (even a word???)...lol.

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Thats why I live out in the country. Everyone sees smoke, smells smoke and doesnt worry. Now as for folks coming from that city... they all know that they arent welcome here. Even we know not to go down certain roads. We all heat our homes with oak and hickory and pecan. Down in our neck of the woods, that smoke doesnt indicate anything out of the norm. BUT>>> a solar oven or a rocket stove is great for concealing cooking. The city folks will also have to swim a wide furious river to get to us. Can be done.. but not without 3 miles of guinea hens letting us all know someone is coming. And our neighbors beagles, geese, fire ant mounds for the uninformed etc etc. We still have another BOL as well. BUT we just dont worry about the influx of outsiders to all of our private and posted land. The bridges and one road to our area are already planned for defenses.

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