Sign in to follow this  
CarsonCityJay

tips on fire concealment

Recommended Posts

My grandfather alway warned me about putting some kinds of rock into fires we have a vein of low grade coal shale running in a creek near where I grew up, it would not burn, but definitely crackle and pop and send small missiles ( of course I didn't listen to him) and I know that some other kind can crack or split if you heat them to much, I used a large sandstone for a fire cap as a kid once it split with a pretty good pop when it got to hot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One "trick" for the hot rock method to avoid digging is to sew a sack out of wool or leather (wool is best) to put heated rocks into and then put directly into your bedroll. The wool will insulate you from the rocks and still allow the heat to warm you on the coldest of nights. I understand this (and other ideas) may NOT be the safest, but in survival, some choices are based on necassity and not OSHA. Wool was used by our forefathers because of it's resistance to burning.

 

Please note that should your wool catch fire don't breath the smoke, burning wool in some cases will produce cyanide gas...this is especially true if the amount of oxygen present is limited.

 

Having said that, wool is also the only natural fiber that is fire resistant and usually will take an open flame to catch. That is one of the reasons why the military still uses wool in this day of synthetic fibers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wool smolders instead of melting to your skin or bursting into flames

 

Yep, one of the reasons that the military uses natural fibers <for the most part> for their uniforms. Hard to fight when your covered with melted plastic as a result of your clothes.

 

Any one remember the rayon 'mother in law' dresses from back in the day? Thing would burst into flame and burn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stupid non edit button...

 

While in uncles yacht club, the main concern we had with wool in fires was when they were in the berthing sections of the boat...

Under those circumstances the chances of the wool producing cyanide was pretty high...and everyone had at least one wool blanket as well as their crackerjacks.

 

Only had two while I was onboard that I had to deal with...one was caused by an electrical short, another by no fire watch on the other side of a bulkhead while people were welding. Both were caught well before they became a real issue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this