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JonM1911

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So I didn't see a thread on these, I figured I'd start one. I work in IT and I travel a lot. Most of it is within 40 miles of home, so its not too bad, however on certain occasions I'm 100 or more miles away. While I've never been stranded, AAA is a lifesaver for the 2 times I've had some sort of trouble, but that's still a long way if there's ever some sort of trouble. On my person all the time: Leatherman, phone, wallet, paracord bracelet, Surefire light, CCW (when legal).

 

Right now, here is where I stand:

BDS Tactical 3 day pack

LMF II Infantry Combat Knife w sheath

SOL's Emergency bivvy

Cochlan's Fire Starters (Basically a match and tinder in one)

Waterproof matches

100 rounds of ammo for my carry weapon

Backup Surefire light

Change of clothes (changed from summer to winter wear)

Extra gloves and hat (now getting to winter)

Shemgah

 

What I know I need:

IFAK

High calorie food (beef jerky, bars, nuts, etc)

Local maps

Compass

Spare batteries

Extra knife (folder)

Paracord

Pen and Pencil

Small pad

Headlamp? (I can get them cheap so why not)

Sm. roll of ductape

 

At this point, I can't think of much else. Trying to cover the most likely scenarios, but have enough to get by if I need to 'hoof it' over half the state. If there's anything major, its escaping me. I wear dress shoes for work, so an extra pair of shoes is a must. Easy enough for spring, summer, and fall, but we get a lot of snow in the winter, so I've been thinking of picking up another pair of boots so I can keep one in the car at all times.

 

I've also considered starting a smaller EDC bag/pack or something, maybe even a pouch that could be attached to the MOLLE/PALLES webbing, but I'm not too concerned about that at the moment.

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I keep this bag in my SUV, and I suppose it plays a role as a GHB.

 

2362378620_9be3be3eee.jpg

Truck Bag by mr.smashy, on Flickr

 

It's a County Comm EOD bag and an Emdom 3" Wide Load. Approximate size is 12" x 8" x 7.5".

 

Contents change based on season, but the basic load is as follows:

 

2362380360_8056e3517b.jpg

Wide Load Contents by mr.smashy, on Flickr

 

In the Wide Load up front are an IFAK, smaller first aid kit, lighter, chem lights, N95 masks, strobe, paracord, and a Streamlight TwinTask 2L.

 

2361550391_08183ac9dc.jpg

EOD Bag Contents by mr.smashy, on Flickr

 

In the EOD bag are more chemlights, a bit more paracord, mylar blankets, a mini-Pelican case full of CR123s and a spare Xenon bulb for the Streamlight, shelf stable energy bars, and some MRE components, like FRHs and beverage bags, accessory packs, crackers and spreads and such. Water is kept in a padded bag in a hard case in 32oz Nalgene bottles, and can be grabbed or handed out as the situation requires.

 

Bag was from County Comm and the MOLLE front pouch was from Emdom.

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I keep a little 3 day assault pack in the trunk of my car.

 

2400 Calorie Emergency Food Bar 2x

SOG SEAL Pup 1x

Aluminum 16oz pot with lid 1x (purifying water)

ziplock bag filled with:

Waterproof Matches 20x

Firesteel 1x

Cotton pads soaked in candle wax 5x

Tri folding mini e-tool 1x

Glow Sticks 5x

Adventure Medical Travel first aid kit 1x

Jet Scream whistle 1x

SOL Emergency Bivy 1x

Extra charging cable for my phone 1x

Flashlight and extra batteries 1x

--(can't remember brand of flashlight. I got it a while ago.)

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I have been recently working on my own GMHB. and here is a list of the Items I have in it at present.

 

Viper 72hr Patrol Bag - the bag

Bolle rolly pouch - extra side bag if needed can be detached

Pantac water bottle pouch - holds a 1litre Sigg bottle nicely or my 32oz Naglene stainless Backpacker bottle

 

Poncho - lightweight green (4xlenght of cordage and 4x 4" nails) (mini shelter kit and waterproof)

military headover - an Brit army issue hat/balaclava/neckwarmer (loads of other uses like an extra warm buff but better)

waterproof lightweight gloves

windshirt (which is also showerproof and packs down to less size than a fist and very lightweight but very warm)

min note book and pen and pencil

mini multi head screwdriver

mini mull grips and metal/wood saw blades

spork

2x cylumes

1x Krill light (2xAA batery cylume stick last for ages)

Spare pay-as-you-go Mobile spare battery and £15 credit on it (all fully charged)

SAK (forester model with locking blade)

2x FFD bandages

FAk (including small trauma kit)

Lighter

Firesteel + quicktinder and wetfire

2x Large bin bags (101 uses) :)

small survival tin (an ex work one)

millbank bag (waterfilter)

Sigg metal mug and flask (holds 0.6 litres)

Mora Clipper knife

sweedish fold-a-way cup

brew kit

emergency rations (high energy food/drinks powders)

30' Paracord (550lb)

sharpening stone and steel

10m duct tape wraped onto plastic card

Maps to get to and from work and home (1; 50 000scale) (I work in south England and come from the Midlands about 100miles away, although I have accomodation where I work) local maps to both home and work (1;25 000 scale)

Silva type 54 Military compass (marked in Degrees and Mils)

Peztl head torch

small MP3 player

Bateries for all electrical equipment with extras at least 3 spare set for each kit(all lithium so last longer and can handle the cold better)

Lightweight change of clothes and spare socks

survival blanket (heavyduty/multi use one)

survival blanket (mylar)

 

Other work gear that I happen to be needing or using at the time :)

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I like the idea of the candle wax fire starters, I may have to do that (I need to clean out two of the candle jars I have for improvised shot glasses for a skit in the acting class I am taking this semester, so its a perfect excuse to empty the wax;)). Does anyone know where I can get TOPO maps printed off to the correct scale (1/50000) for my state? I could try and do it myself, but I would be likely to use alot of paper trying to figure it out, and then, have a bunch of 8.5x11 sheets... Not what I call a good way about it.

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Another thing I forgot to mention that makes sense to me is this. Before making your get home bag consider the farthest distance you would most likely have to travel make your bag for that distance. I know this might seem very obvious but the distance I would most likely have to go on a daily basis is at most ten miles. The first bag I made was basically a bug out bag with EVERYTHING that I would need and this made the bag very bulky and heavy and somewhat unnecssary for that distnace. Just something to think about.

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Have to agree with that last comment by Tinderwolf. Im in the same boat, though maybe about 20 miles at the most. I do struggle with the idea of a get home bag as I could cover that distance in a day easily. So wonder about the need for all that gear. However in winter thats a different story so will probably keep some winter gear just in case. My car is horrific in the snow so would probably ditch it if push came to shove.

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Have to agree with that last comment by Tinderwolf. Im in the same boat, though maybe about 20 miles at the most. I do struggle with the idea of a get home bag as I could cover that distance in a day easily. So wonder about the need for all that gear. However in winter thats a different story so will probably keep some winter gear just in case. My car is horrific in the snow so would probably ditch it if push came to shove.

As to how long it takes to get home I'd recommend you make your absolute best estimate for travel under the worse conditions you can imagine, take that estimate and double it. Then add 10% because Murphy is a bloody optimist. It is the old question I have for folks who tell me they get 30 miles to the gallon so they have plenty of gas. My question? "What exactly IS your MPG when you are sitting in a traffic jam for 20 hours?" I've seen it here in Houston more than once.

If you had to walk those 20 miles, that is at least 5 or 6 hours IF you are in good shape AND it isn't flooding or snowing (blizzard conditions are TOUGH) AND you don't have to dodge rioters or police who want to know WHY you're breaking curfew, etc. What I can do on a good day, in my car, is no indicator at all of how long it will take when TSHTF. Unless of course you are very lucky. As I have said in many places, planning on luck is a really, really lousy Plan A.

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im with you on your thoughts here capt bart.

heck just living in ATL i see different times to get to the same place. one day i can get to work in 11 minutes, the very next day might take 45 minutes with no seen reason why. i cant imagine a real SHTF

situation.

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GHB for me has varied greatly. When I lived in L.A. it was pretty much water, 1st aid kit, socks, sunblock, knife, light jacket, fire, emergency radio for 411. I lived about 15 miles from work. Now, approx. the same distance but there is more small town/rural terrain. I have modified my GHB with some long underwear and wool socks and a few other things.

 

The one thing I did not change was the bag. I use a pretty run of the mill, everyday looking backpack. My thought pattern here is tactical/miltary style packs draw attention. If I find myself having to huff it I want to blend in best I can. There are some small college campus' in town ad I can walk right through and no one would bat an eye. But if I come waltzin through college with a molle pack, I going to get noticed and hassled.

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