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jerry9491

Anyone have SHTF experience?

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Guest survival101

Respect to all who posted. Compared to you, I've had very few SHTF situations in life. Some are very personal, and I don't choose to share. But the one's that may count are riding out Hurricane Hugo in Conway (Near Myrtle Beach) SC. And the flood of 1979 in Mississippi. Hugo was amazing. We were between the area where the storm surge devastated, and the area where the tornadoes began to spin off. I was well stocked on food, and ran a bathtub full of water. Mopped the kitchen floor, and placed a tarp, a mattress, pillows and blankets in that room, with no windows and an inner wall. Stayed all night with our toddler in the "safe" room, and in the morning came out to view the damage. The flood was the Pearl River, overflowing it's banks in a hundred year flood, unanticipated by the Waterway Management Agency. It came up into our raised home. We hauled out furniture in the flood water and placed it up the hill. Eventually, the current came in, and the snakes came out. My mother pulled our little Sunfish sailboat from the garage, and we continued to haul out every single thing. Except the piano, which we had to raise up on concrete blocks to save it. Our neighbor gave us a room to share. We were sore and hungry and sunburned. My mom had the forethought to go buy lots of bleach. When the water receded, before the government could come shut off our water, we were in the house spraying everything down with the hose and bleach solution. When they finally shut us down, and made us evacuate, we were scared that we'd return to total ruin. Well, it would have been, but we had done all the right things. I learned a lot from my folks. One is to take your fate in your own hands, by being prepared.

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Why are we too proud or cheap just to pay a professional team....egad!

 

Wolfe,

the kid (mid 20's) of a paramedic, stood there, looking at me on the stretcher, then said, "You know, sir, at your age (I though 'I hate you, punk') - glances up at the tree - it's cheaper to pay someone to do this kind of work than to pay for the ambulance ride (I KNEW I hated the kid!)". Since this IS a family sight, I won't repeat what I said to him then.

 

Trouble was, he was right and we both knew it. GRUMP! I HATE doing stupid stuff and THAT was stupid.:mad:

 

Oh, well, we live and learn .... IF we live.

 

Thanks for the well wishes but baring a miracle (literally) I'm permanently disabled. I shattered my heel and it knitted back together at an angle. In order to fix it, they'd have to go in, re-break it, put in pins etc. Since I'm a diabetic, the medicos think the lower blood flow that diabetics have coupled with the low blood flow in that area for everyone, presents too much of a risk of losing the whole foot. That is why I can claim 'honorable mention' in the Darwin Awards. I didn't get dead but I didn't get away free and clear either.

 

I can walk without the cane but very much of that and the pain, especially in the ankle, gets pretty bad. The docs say they can fuse the ankle but I don't want to go there yet. That is another non-reversible event.

Edited by Capt Bart

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I can walk without the cane but very much of that and the pain, especially in the ankle, gets pretty bad. The docs say they can fuse the ankle but I don't want to go there yet. That is another non-reversible event.

 

Capt,

 

That's funny and tragic (for you) at the same time, but you never know what breakthrough is around the corner.....in any case, you are smart not to risk your foot....1/2 of something is better than all of nothing....

 

I respect your self-reliance, and strongly believe that is the secret to living a long healthy life....do as much as you can yourself, as long as you can. I think the worse thing we can do for older folks is too much for them.

 

On that note, one day my old Confederate grandpa fell out of a tree doing the chainsaw trim thing and it landed on his shoulder, crushing it. He was so cheap (WWII gen) he drove the chainsaw back to the rental place so he didn't get charged for an extra day. Then he drove himself to the emergency ward, shifting and driving with his left hand. They kept him there a week.....LOL! He looked and talked like someone straight out of Deliverance but a good soul and self-educated, read all the time. I still miss him.

 

Won't even mention the French grandpa who was a test driver for Renault....had to hide is keys at 95 because he was such a hazard on the road...it was like Mr. Toad's Wild Ride with him driving, he hit a speed bump doing 80 clicks on day coming out of St. Tropez with my entire family onboard and we caught some air! I guess he didn't see it....he just cackled when landing and kept on going...I'd translate what he said as something like "...those bastards put these things in to slow me down, it doesn't f-ing work!" Poor old guy just died last year....his 70 year old girlfriend went to the funeral.....must be the wine...LOL!

 

Wolfe

Edited by Dangerwolfe

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Wolfe,

Could be the wine but my wife's tea totaling, paternal grandmother was still driving on the interstates when she was 97. Her youngest son (70ish) had to steal the distributor wire to keep her from driving. Had it towed to the repair shot and PAID the mechanic to say it couldn't be fixed!

 

She was 103 when she died. A hardier breed back then I guess.

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You know Capt, it's really a throw of the dice with health. There's always the Winston Churchill factor...but he was exceptional (drinker,smoker obese and long-lived)

 

Generally, those before us didn't have a hormone injected, pesticide flavored industrialized food supply with Super-sized meals on the cheap, 12 teaspoons of sugar in every 12 oz Coke, cell phones, ac, vehicles and other conveniences that turn us into jello on legs....as with a Darwin Award health is often a choice.

 

Want a good read try Fast Food Nation. They guy had it vetted by 12 lawyers just so the Food folks couldn't touch him.

 

Wolfe

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Generally, those before us didn't have a hormone injected, pesticide flavored industrialized food supply with Super-sized meals on the cheap, 12 teaspoons of sugar in every 12 oz Coke, cell phones, ac, vehicles and other conveniences that turn us into jello on legs....as with a Darwin Award health is often a choice.

 

Interesting to think that, assuming someone survived TEOTWAWKI, the change in diet alone could actually lengthen their lifespan. You certainly can't load up on Pizza Hut, donuts, Doritos, ice cream, Taco Bell, etc. if there are no fast food or convenience stores open any longer and there's no way to run a factory to create processed food!

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I've had a lot of SHTF events that I didn't realize were that until after they were over. Sometimes not until YEARS afterwards.

 

The first was November 10th,1972 my Dad was an airline pilot and he got a free trip (2 actually) to Cuba, at the insisting of 3 armed fellas on his plane. Threatened to dive bomb Oak Ridge nuclear facility, would have been shot down if they'd come close to were Nixon was vacationing in Florida. Dad wrote a book about it and I wasn't really interested in reading it until 15 years later when I was in college. I realized then how close I'd come to losing him and that would have been the biggest SHTF event in my life. I was four when it happened and I had no fear because I knew my Dad could handle anything. That innocense is lost by the time you turn 19.

There were a bunch of times it hit the fan and the fan was pointed at me when it hit though. Once, while taking flying lessons, I caught a 20kt crosswind gust out of no where when I was only feet off the ground. The right wingtip nearly hit the ground, but I was recovering fine. My instructor totally freaked and started grabbing the controls. I stuck my right arm in front of him and gently (my hairy butt!) shoved him back away from the controls. I recovered, landed, and taxied up to the fueling area. When I got out of the plane, my knees buckled. Never flew with that instructor again though.

I've had a gun pulled on me twice. I talked my way out of both of those. Have no idea how, I just said what the guys needed to hear to make them put the guns down I guess. In both cases I threw up a while afterwards. I guess it takes a while to sink in that my life may end. Maybe I take the Captain Kirk outlook?

"I don't believe in the no win option."

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Maybe I take the Captain Kirk outlook?

"I don't believe in the no win option."

 

As a kid, that is probably true. As you get older you come to understand that there is a 'no win' option. It is a great epiphany to realize 'I COULD CEASE TO EXIST!'. Not a pleasant one either. What is really tough is when it is a loved one and not you.

 

Louis L'Amour was fond of pointing out, you never know what a man is made of until he loses and keeps going. Winning doesn't measure a man, losing does. Painful but true.

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Ya made me smile Cap! After the day I've had, I feel like I lost big. I kept thinking all day that I'm getting too old for this crap (fedex courier on an extended rural route).

But you're words about losing and keep going really hit home. I don't know if I ever mentioned this before, but this is the reason I keep going.. http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/katherinebarnard

Her mom and I had been married for six months when it hit the fan. Laurie even said she'd understand if I couldn't take it and wanted out. I'll admit I thought about for a second or two, but I'd probably have been sent right to Hell if I did. So I just kept going, as Forest Gump would say.

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Ya made me smile Cap! After the day I've had, I feel like I lost big. I kept thinking all day that I'm getting too old for this crap (fedex courier on an extended rural route).

But you're words about losing and keep going really hit home. I don't know if I ever mentioned this before, but this is the reason I keep going.. http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/katherinebarnard

Her mom and I had been married for six months when it hit the fan. Laurie even said she'd understand if I couldn't take it and wanted out. I'll admit I thought about for a second or two, but I'd probably have been sent right to Hell if I did. So I just kept going, as Forest Gump would say.

 

Dominus vobiscum

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It was a Tuesday about 7 Am I was nursing a hangover I was intending to have later when the hooker /

bar maid, asked if I wanted another beer and shot of rum.

as I was about to answer a few buds were scattered here and there I noticed a tater or pineapple got lobbed through the open door we all seem to yell at the same time flipped over tables and started looking intently for change on the floor, the locals were not slow either.

 

After the rearrangement of the furniture we thought that the back door hinges were in need of testing

so we did, they seemed to work fine and we decided to hang out elsewhere seeing how the remodel looked like it would take a while.

After my ears quit ringing I heard the NEW bar maid / hooker say beer and a shot again?

 

This seemed to be a basis for most of my remembrances throughout Asia and Africa and South America

and in some places in the U.S. look similar weird ain't it.

These were the normal days unexceptional and almost boring and like a junkie you need a fix of adrenalin and

the names and faces have been changed because I can't remember or did not care enough to bother.

somewhere along the way everything got blurred the reasons / excuses I heard were all the same,

No hope no money no choices my reasons I cannot think of a single good answer except I got into a rut.

kinda like type casting, I was available liked the freedom and the money and lawlessness of it all.

do I miss it? hell yea and hell no.

 

The world is a very different place now and what used to be is gone and now I do not care but the days of

high shenanigans are over and everyone lives in a police state weather they know it or not.

After a good sh*t shower & shave and a new suit I look like a new man the soul well that is a long

and haunting story and not so easy to clean up.

 

People who write books fail to see that it's an indictment of action deed or knowledge of events

so If I ever take on a nom de plume it will be book of fiction about things I know about that ought to be good for

the first sentence now I need a title and the rest and print it on a roll of toilet paper so it can have a dual use.

and then I won't have to worry about re-readers and book shop resale of my rambling thoughts.

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Or... given the average lenth of your posts Snake, we could just print em out, fix a binder at Kinkos and name it Ramblings of a Grumpy Vet. J/K

 

You already have your book

 

You know, I think snake in general has really good, pointed insights. But in all honesty, I find I have to engage 2 or 3 or my remaining few brain cells and read his posts very carefully.

 

I not at all sure that my head wouldn't explode if we did as you suggest. :rolleyes:

 

(Just pulling your .... snake!)

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If Snake ever writes a book, I'm definitely gonna putnaside thentime to read it! That would be an edge of the seat read. Same with Cap. I enjoy hearing the stories from the guys that stood up aft it hit the fan and were surprised to find they were still there.

I spent an hour once talking to a Tuskeegee Airman. When he talked about looking over his shoulder at the nose of a 109, it was like being in the cockpit with him. One of the best was a former B-17 pilot who was forced to bail out. He said, "During parachute training, they had to kick my ass out the door. But when the AA shell hit the left wing and it started to fold, I was 1000 feet below the plane before it finished folding!" He went on to spend two years in a P.O.W. camp in Germany.

Of all the men I've met or talked to, none of them ever thought they were anything special and refused to accept being called a hero. Their response was, "hell, it was just what I had to do". Several have mentioned that it was the best time of their lives even though they were scared senseless most of the time. That's something I can understand from a historical point of view, but something I'll never experience in life. Aything I have sounds like Al Bundy talking about the high school football game.

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Ya made me smile Cap! After the day I've had, I feel like I lost big. I kept thinking all day that I'm getting too old for this crap (fedex courier on an extended rural route).

But you're words about losing and keep going really hit home. I don't know if I ever mentioned this before, but this is the reason I keep going.. http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/katherinebarnard

Her mom and I had been married for six months when it hit the fan. Laurie even said she'd understand if I couldn't take it and wanted out. I'll admit I thought about for a second or two, but I'd probably have been sent right to Hell if I did. So I just kept going, as Forest Gump would say.

 

A father who stands by his wife and children is a MAN and a hero. It doesn't take all that much to be in a fire fight. Just a LOT of poor judgement and being too busy trying to stay alive to worry about it. The toughest thing I ever had to do was to comfort my wife during her third miscarriage or hold my baby girl while the doctors were cleaning up the massive burn on her leg or ...... well, you get the point. After 43 years of marriage, those are the times that were tough. I have the greatest respect for a MAN. I like the line from 'The Magnificent Seven' where the gun fighter spanks the kid for calling his father a coward. He was right; fighting is merely physical bravery or perhaps, in my case at least, desperation over what my poor judgement got me into. Real bravery is the intestinal fortitude that allows you to do the tough thing for the sake of the family.

 

Hero is a much abused and overworked word. I've know a few and they are special people. You have my respect, sir.

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Thanks Cap, but all I did was what I said I'd do when I said "for better or worse". And like I told Laurie, I just wasn't expecting the worse right off the starting line. Kat's actually doing pretty well. You'd never know she was sick to look at her. Her Dad took her to see Los Angeles and San Francisco for ten days. I grew up in a town of about 70 people and can't even begin to imagine why anybody would want to live in such a big, busy place like LA and San Fran. West Mobile is too big for me!

I didn't mean to bring this thread to a crashing halt folks. I'd like to hear some more SHTF stories if ya'll are up for it. It's kind of like a, "well, that hasn't happened to me but now I know what to look for when it does" thing. I always figured it's better to learn from somebody else's experience.

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SHTF in my area three times within the last year. We got hit by two tornadoes, one of which went right behind my home and dropped a 150 foot pine tree on my H3. We were out of power for a week but power was the least of our worries. Folks lost their homes, vehicles and loved ones. What most people didn’t know is that our town has three drinking water pumping stations. Two of the three were down for seven days so the one pumping station was supplying the entire town with water. Had that one died, there would have been no fresh water for the entire town. My family would have been ready for the third pump failure but my neighbors were screwed.

 

We had a freak ice storm hit earlier than normal. Since the leaves were still on the trees, the limbs broke off and cut all power lines on their way to the ground. We were out of power for eight days and it was cold. People’s homes were freezing so most people went to stay with family. My wife and I had power, lights, heat and I watched seasons of 24 because the cable was out, too.

 

The last of the trifecta was that the main street through town flooded big time. Most businesses had nearly a foot of water in their rooms. The main street was closed. Again, we were ready. All of our vehicles are four wheel drive so we drove around with no troubles at all.

 

What did we learn?

 

My wife learned that I was correct when I started prepping over a year ago. We had food, water, power, heat, tarps, ropes and everything else we needed. My neighbors learned that I had enough stocked up to supply the entire area. They ‘borrowed’ three tarps, hundreds of feet of rope and returned none of it. We stored their foods in our freezer, made coffee for them, etc. But I told them that they’d better prepare themselves.

 

Even in Massachusetts, people come together to help out their neighbors when in dire need. My neighbor helped me cut the tree off of my H3. People helped others get the trees off their homes. We helped people tie tarps over their roof to keep the water and snow out.

 

My wife learned that being prepared is worth every dollar spent and every hour invested in packaging food, water, etc. Buying Mylar bags, oxygen eaters, first aid kits, and such is worth every nickel. She learned that having extra water around is awesome. Today, she regularly comes home from shopping with one or two items used for prepping. She likes having firearms and ammo around. She’s learned to shoot, loves it and is a dead eye (I no longer piss her off!).

 

So these SHTF scenarios, although minor in the grand scale of things, really helped my wife wake up to prepping. She has been cured and her rose-colored glasses removed. And the kids have caught on. Although they have been out of the house for nearly ten years, they have bug out bags, first aid kits, etc in their homes and vehicles.

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SHTF in my area three times within the last year. We got hit by two tornadoes, one of which went right behind my home and dropped a 150 foot pine tree on my H3. We were out of power for a week but power was the least of our worries. Folks lost their homes, vehicles and loved ones. What most people didn’t know is that our town has three drinking water pumping stations. Two of the three were down for seven days so the one pumping station was supplying the entire town with water. Had that one died, there would have been no fresh water for the entire town. My family would have been ready for the third pump failure but my neighbors were screwed.

 

We had a freak ice storm hit earlier than normal. Since the leaves were still on the trees, the limbs broke off and cut all power lines on their way to the ground. We were out of power for eight days and it was cold. People’s homes were freezing so most people went to stay with family. My wife and I had power, lights, heat and I watched seasons of 24 because the cable was out, too.

 

The last of the trifecta was that the main street through town flooded big time. Most businesses had nearly a foot of water in their rooms. The main street was closed. Again, we were ready. All of our vehicles are four wheel drive so we drove around with no troubles at all.

 

What did we learn?

 

My wife learned that I was correct when I started prepping over a year ago. We had food, water, power, heat, tarps, ropes and everything else we needed. My neighbors learned that I had enough stocked up to supply the entire area. They ‘borrowed’ three tarps, hundreds of feet of rope and returned none of it. We stored their foods in our freezer, made coffee for them, etc. But I told them that they’d better prepare themselves.

 

Even in Massachusetts, people come together to help out their neighbors when in dire need. My neighbor helped me cut the tree off of my H3. People helped others get the trees off their homes. We helped people tie tarps over their roof to keep the water and snow out.

 

My wife learned that being prepared is worth every dollar spent and every hour invested in packaging food, water, etc. Buying Mylar bags, oxygen eaters, first aid kits, and such is worth every nickel. She learned that having extra water around is awesome. Today, she regularly comes home from shopping with one or two items used for prepping. She likes having firearms and ammo around. She’s learned to shoot, loves it and is a dead eye (I no longer piss her off!).

 

So these SHTF scenarios, although minor in the grand scale of things, really helped my wife wake up to prepping. She has been cured and her rose-colored glasses removed. And the kids have caught on. Although they have been out of the house for nearly ten years, they have bug out bags, first aid kits, etc in their homes and vehicles.

 

All to often the way it goes people don't see the need to prep until they need to HAVE prepped!

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