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awake

Urban Survival --real world experience.

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Mcrot, that's just what I was thinking. All of the hypotheticals don't measure up to a solid first-hand account of what it's really like when SHTF. This was a good reminder about the need to recognize what is going on around you and continue to adapt as a situation evolves. And it's also a scary reminder that you can be caught flat-footed if you just go about your ordinary life and listen to whatever the government and talking heads tell you.

 

I found one line particularly chilling: "At first, the weak perish. Then the rest fight."

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Guest survival101

Thanks, awake. That was an important read for me, and a reminder to try and get back on track. Hope to be on top of my game again in a very short time. Based on this account of life in war time, it can't be short enough.

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Can't thank you enough. Extremely useful and fascinating read just chock full of good advice. Like other said, I need to re-read it several more times just to absorb it all. Some of the biggest lessons are:

 

Don't go it alone, seems like 10 able bodied is a good group number

Keep a low profile in dress, actions, movements and habitation

Do your trading at a remote location

Hygiene/medicines/are as valuable as bullets

Stock up on trading items everyone will need

Get skills that you can market after SHTF

Good people do bad things to survive and it's likely you will need to do them as well

Don't keep all your stocks in one location

 

Wolfe

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The way i see things these days, it's getting harder to trust anyone. I judge them by their actions & not by the feel good lip service they tell me. For me it takes a very long time to trust someone that i've just met or known for awhile. Best of friends can be the worst of enemmies, i've seen it with own eyes in my life time. Oh Ya i might sound abit paranoid. I'd rather be safe than sorry in the long hall. The sharks/vultures/swindlers are out there. Like the saying goes in GOD i TRUST. Everyone else keep your hands where i can see them.

Edited by P210SIG

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I realy HOPE that those who read this take it serious!!!

 

Personaly,Im selling everything that I DONT use to bolster my "TOOTH"..My "tail" is planted and ready..

 

At 58 I have seen to much to ignor the REALITY of "NOT IF but WHEN"

 

JMO..

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i am glad that this article was useful to the group. For me It is slap in the face reality check. I went today and bought several plastic bottles of rot gut whiskey for trade. Rethinking my ammo supplies. think i will read it again.

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"Yes, but coffee and cigarettes were even more expensive. I had lots of alcohol and traded it without problems. Alcohol consumption grew over 10 times as compared to peacetime. Perhaps today it’s more useful to keep a stock of cigarettes, lighters, and batteries. They take up less space."

 

Im thinking, for the purpose of trade, to make smaller portion baggys for things like coffee; using Ziplocs and baggy enough coffee for one good pot per baggy. So instead of trading a whole full coffee container or unknown serving count, You can say.. ok, heres enuf for one pot of coffee. just a thought

 

Or doing the same thing with alcohol. Most would probably just want the whole bottle.

 

Target has these little travel size med kits for $1. (2 mini-gauze, 2 alcohol wipes, and 6 Bandaids in a little plastic box) Fits easy in a pocket. I added 1pair Vinyl gloves and 6more cheap bandaids.

 

Something Ive been doing for my Prep this whole time...rationing rubbing alcohol and Hydrogen Peroxide into small 2oz. bottles. i still think this is a good idea.

Edited by NavyVet_77

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You don't have to break down the coffee...store sells little one shot packets that you can buy. I know I know, its not as cheap...but its good for one or two pots. Its vacuum sealed. So that would/should improve its trade value as well help keep it fresh.

 

I also remember my dads storys of when he was growing up durring the war in Europe. Having to go from farm house to farm house and beg for food with his mother.

 

About the hospitals, I doubt the gangs went in and shot the place up...<they might have to get a point across>...more likely they went in and cleaned the place out of medical supplys. Once the antibiotics were gone, bandages were gone, anticeptic gone...well...not much left for the staff to work with. I guess you could compare it to the field hospitals durring the Civil War here.

Edited by vonBayern

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WOW! K, right now I'm just one step short of freaking out. Definitely have to work on my "tooth" more, lots more1

 

 

Awake, thanks for posting this, was a kick in the rear.

 

Also, I've been meaning to thank you for the "what have you done today" post, it keeps me on track or when I slack off for a day, it gives me the guilts

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This was a real eye-opening read. I'm currently toothless - guess I won't try gumming anyone to death. My husband has recently decided that guns aren't so bad, so things may change a bit here. I'm not terribly well prepared with supplies, though probably better than most of my neighbors. That won't change until I'm back on my feet - nothing I can do about that. The worst thing is, my husband has been eating out of my stash - thinks it's great that I had stuff stockpiled so he wouldn't have to shop much while I'm laid up! On the up side, it does prove (at least to me) that I've put up what he/we will eat.

 

Thanks for posting the link.

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WOW! K, right now I'm just one step short of freaking out. Definitely have to work on my "tooth" more, lots more1

 

 

Awake, thanks for posting this, was a kick in the rear.

 

Also, I've been meaning to thank you for the "what have you done today" post, it keeps me on track or when I slack off for a day, it gives me the guilts

 

You're Welcome. Sorry about the guilt's. That thread just shows how much we all have to share.

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Wow I had to read it twice before it all sunk in. I'd love to have a sit down with that man. Nothing compares to first hand accounts
.

 

 

i have two friends at work that were in the war, they were not on the same side either.

i get to hear stories like this every day and worse. from what the author told, he didnt have it so bad

compaired to some of the stories ive heard.

i use to work with a 17 yr old sniper from that war too. man the stories he would tell!

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