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TheDefaultHuman

Taking a 12 hour Hike, what to bring?

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What would you take with you, whats a big priority?

What should you eat the whole time?

 

Mostly foresty area, bears, moose.

Not super cold out, not sleeping there, just a long hike.

 

No more then 5 miles into the woods probably.

 

Also theres lots of plants and trees and wildlife,

what can I do out there? My house is boring.

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Are you hiking alone? Or with at least a buddy? Either way, let someone who ISN'T hiking with you know where you're starting out, what area you plan on hiking to, and when you expect to be back, and give them instructions for when to call for help if you don't return (for example, if you're four hours late returning).

 

You don't plan on being out overnight, but stuff happens, so you need to make sure that you have at least the bare minimum you'd need to survive overnight if something happens. And you really need to cover the basics:

 

  • Navigation - compass, map, GPS
  • Food and water - take enough for an extra day; water is heavy and if you're going to be near a water source like a river, water filtration devices could be a good alternative
  • Clothing - layers including pants/coat to change into even if the day is shorts weather and a warm hat
  • First aid - make sure you have a decent first aid kit
  • Flashlight - check the batteries; a head lamp can also be handy
  • Fire - matches/lighter, firestarter kit for emergency needs
  • Tools - knife, multi-tool, walking stick
  • Emergency shelter - tarp, emergency reflective blanket, bivy tent, something
  • At least one pair of extra socks, maybe two

 

Other things to consider: insect repellent, chapstick, sunscreen, binoculars, camera, toilet paper and sanitation shovel, Sham-Wow or similar towel, bandanna, gloves, post-hike snack and change of clothing/shoes for when you're back at your car, rain gear, handgun with holster/CCP or bear spray

 

For things to do, look for books that tell you more about plant life, foraging for food, or tracking in the woods. Familiarize yourself with the environment, look for animal signs, see if there's anything edible out this early in the year (note: don't try the mushrooms). Birding can be surprisingly fun, too. Take a notebook and record your observations, draw, journal, just enjoy being outside.

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Oh! And you asked what to eat. It could be a time to try out MREs or other things you've picked up for your preps, especially if you're able to build fires where you're hiking. If not, power bars, fruit, sandwiches, meal replacement drinks all work.

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If you are not an experienced hiker, I wouldn't start with a 12 hour hike! Plan on no more than an hour out and an hour and a half back. Still plenty of time to get in trouble so take all the precautions. Once you are comfortable with the short hike, then go up in duration. I assume you mean 12 hours round trip but remember that it could become overnight very easily so be prepared to spend the night out there.

 

Hiking is one of those things that you really must start with baby steps (yes, pun intended). If you plan on hiking 6 hours out and 6 hours back, that is dawn to dusk! What are you going to do if you start feeling tired at hour 5? You still have to WALK out. Remember 6 hours in may well be 8 hours out since you are tired and not as quick on your feet. I knew a SCUBA instructor who was asked how far he could go into a cave and he answered, less than half the air you have left! Hard and fast rule; if you have to come back you can only go half of your endurance in and it takes more out of you as you come back so BE PREPARED to not make the round trip.

 

Just my not so humble opinion.

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My girlfriend and I did a 14 mile hike in about 5-6 hours. That was with us taking our sweet time and stopping at a deserted beach for a nice picnic.

 

I don't see how 5 miles can possibly take you 12 hours? Not even if its 5 miles in and 5 miles back. On a trail that shouldn't take you more than 6-8 hours tops. If there is no trail then you better cut that distance in half and have LOTS of ways to find your way back. You can mark your own trail with some BRIGHT orange tape. Take a compass and make sure you have at least an extra 2 hours of daylight "left over" your expected travel time. Being in the woods at night is not fun. All the critters come out. It feels like spider city in some places.

 

Definitely take 2 flashlights (1 headlamp), a GPS if possible, some snacks and 2 meals, 2 liters of water per person, a knife, and some sort of signaling device (whistle, flare gun, etc.).

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My girlfriend and I did a 14 mile hike in about 5-6 hours. That was with us taking our sweet time and stopping at a deserted beach for a nice picnic.

 

I don't see how 5 miles can possibly take you 12 hours? Not even if its 5 miles in and 5 miles back. On a trail that shouldn't take you more than 6-8 hours tops. If there is no trail then you better cut that distance in half and have LOTS of ways to find your way back. You can mark your own trail with some BRIGHT orange tape. Take a compass and make sure you have at least an extra 2 hours of daylight "left over" your expected travel time. Being in the woods at night is not fun. All the critters come out. It feels like spider city in some places.

 

Definitely take 2 flashlights (1 headlamp), a GPS if possible, some snacks and 2 meals, 2 liters of water per person, a knife, and some sort of signaling device (whistle, flare gun, etc.).

 

Exit,

Some good recommendations. I prefer to ALWAYS have a whistle - I can puff on that thing a lot longer than I can yell! You could be right about the travel time BUT my experience is that folks new to walking/hiking ALWAYS overestimate the ground they can cover. 4 miles an hour is an easy walk if you're in shape and the terrain is favorable. A sudden shower and muddy/slippery ground can drop that to less than 1 mile an hour in a heart beat. Add to that the possibility of being hurt or fatigued and it gets SLOW fast. I like to recommend that folks set a limit on how far in, Autonomous' 1/3 rule is good, and then leave their 6 hours for the walk out. At least at first they will probably have extra daylight left (let's hope so) but if they run into problems, they have a fall back. As they get more experience, they can adapt to suit their experience.

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My girlfriend and I did a 14 mile hike in about 5-6 hours. That was with us taking our sweet time and stopping at a deserted beach for a nice picnic.

 

I don't see how 5 miles can possibly take you 12 hours? Not even if its 5 miles in and 5 miles back. On a trail that shouldn't take you more than 6-8 hours tops. If there is no trail then you better cut that distance in half and have LOTS of ways to find your way back. You can mark your own trail with some BRIGHT orange tape. Take a compass and make sure you have at least an extra 2 hours of daylight "left over" your expected travel time. Being in the woods at night is not fun. All the critters come out. It feels like spider city in some places.

 

Definitely take 2 flashlights (1 headlamp), a GPS if possible, some snacks and 2 meals, 2 liters of water per person, a knife, and some sort of signaling device (whistle, flare gun, etc.).

 

 

I was mostly just guesstimating. Its forest, and 1/3 of my time would be screwing around.

 

 

 

 

Maybe I'd start out with 4-5 hours or less sure, sounds good, but still I've gone 4 hours exercise without water, its not pretty but its manageable. I don't see why everyone needs GPS's and fancy gizmo's. I would fancy trying my luck with a fat bag of trail mix, a half gallon of water, and an energy drink for food. I would bring pocket knife and blade knife, maybe a machete, theres lots of trees.

 

But honestly as a kid, I would explore the woods like crazy, but its just scary the farther you go out. Same with the ocean. My main concern is big animals and stuff, I am pretty cautious when it comes to not dieing by a stick falling on me, or falling myself or any everyday risk I take walking down the sidewalk, the woods isn't that different.

 

Yes I would definitely need a map and compass, I know that for sure. Maybe I should get a dog? They make a good companion when all your friends are feeling too lazy.

 

I'm sure I could build myself a backpack for $1000 or less to survive in the woods forever (assuming the authorities wouldn't screw with me), because as an animal/organism of earth you have the genetics to survive off the land without money/help. So a walk in the woods shouldn't be that hard right?

 

Don't worry, I'm not gonna be like those few people that claim to be a crazy natureman, then go into the woods and die from starvation or hypothermia.

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Maybe I'd start out with 4-5 hours or less sure, sounds good, but still I've gone 4 hours exercise without water, its not pretty but its manageable. I don't see why everyone needs GPS's and fancy gizmo's...

 

My main concern is big animals and stuff, I am pretty cautious when it comes to not dieing by a stick falling on me, or falling myself or any everyday risk I take walking down the sidewalk, the woods isn't that different...

 

As an animal/organism of earth you have the genetics to survive off the land without money/help. So a walk in the woods shouldn't be that hard right?

 

Don't worry, I'm not gonna be like those few people that claim to be a crazy natureman, then go into the woods and die from starvation or hypothermia.

 

This is why you sound like the idiots my uncle winds up having to spend most of the summer tracking down in the woods around here (he's on the local search and rescue group). There are SEVERAL big things that you need to remember that make the woods different from a sidewalk:

 

  • Lack of other people around if you need help, and without gizmos, no way of contacting them
  • Extremely long distances to walk or be transported if you are physically injured or medically in need - distances that your dog won't drag you
  • No upkeep and maintenance in the woods (unless on certain trails) to ensure that the ground is stable under your feet and what you touch/walk under/lean against won't give out
  • Plants you've never encountered that can be toxic/cause allergic reactions
  • Animals you've never encountered that can be dangerous (and not just bears and cougars)
  • No provided shelter if the weather changes quickly
  • No street lights if you can't make it home by dark
  • You never once mention bringing appropriate clothing or any means of taking shelter should you run into difficulty, which is exactly how people wind up dying of hypothermia while on a simple walk in the woods

 

Yes, most people could just put some water and trail mix in a bag and have their little hike and be just fine. And many people can overnight - even without supplies - and be fine, too. But hello, you're talking to a bunch of preppers here. People who actually PLAN for contingencies and try to make SMART and realistic decisions. Isn't that your natural tendency, too? I did not misspeak to say that someone who doesn't take potential risks into consideration is an idiot, and frankly, the people who are ill prepared and run into trouble out in the forest make me angry because they endanger all of the people who then have to go out and retrieve them (or their corpses).

 

My question is, what do you think it will prove if you head out with inadequate supplies? And why wouldn't you take a few extra steps to ensure that you can handle whatever comes your way, instead of placing yourself needlessly at the mercy of nature, which is indifferent to your survival at best (and may be actively working to ensure you don't survive a la Darwinism)?

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I was mostly just guesstimating. Its forest, and 1/3 of my time would be screwing around.

 

Maybe I'd start out with 4-5 hours or less sure, sounds good, but still I've gone 4 hours exercise without water, its not pretty but its manageable. I don't see why everyone needs GPS's and fancy gizmo's. I would fancy trying my luck with a fat bag of trail mix, a half gallon of water, and an energy drink for food. I would bring pocket knife and blade knife, maybe a machete, theres lots of trees.

 

But honestly as a kid, I would explore the woods like crazy, but its just scary the farther you go out. Same with the ocean. My main concern is big animals and stuff, I am pretty cautious when it comes to not dieing by a stick falling on me, or falling myself or any everyday risk I take walking down the sidewalk, the woods isn't that different.

 

Yes I would definitely need a map and compass, I know that for sure. Maybe I should get a dog? They make a good companion when all your friends are feeling too lazy.

 

 

Default,

Not needing the GPS is great. Of course, I never needed my Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB) either. That didn't mean I didn't carry it!

 

When you NEED it and don't have it, you'll sing a different tune. - Burt Gummer Tremors 2

 

Don't use it, learn not to need it but NEVER be without the guaranteed to get you home tools. The key to EVERY drill is to make absolutely certain that the drill does NOT become the real thing.

 

Just my not so humble opinion, but if you don't have the modern tools, just in case you're not quite as ready as you think, the drill is 'no drill' and you're playing 'you bet your life' you know what you think you know.

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12 hours take your whole BOB field test carrying it.

 

If you need something and it is not in your BOB then you know what your missing

 

Are you new to GPS this would be the time to test it {with backup} take the instructions.

 

Take protection pepper spray or weapon whatever is legal.

 

foul weather clothing for your area

 

toilet paper and a shovel

 

scenario:

 

2 leave on a 12 hour hike at the end of out leg someone is injured and you cannot carry them

all the way back what would you need to leave for them to protect themselves and you need

for protection to return and get help.

 

did you leave a plan with a couple of responsible people of where you were going your start position

what direction expected route and when you expect to return.

 

do you have a way to signal if you have to stay with your injured partner or if you get separated.

air horn, whistle, etc.

 

have you considered all the possibilities flood from up hill from fire have you checked for fire warnings

your local game warden or forest ranger will know if any warnings or dangers exist like an escaped

convict people targeting left vehicles hey it is a scary world out there.

do you have the emergency numbers for these folks they would be the fastest first responders

and have first hand knowledge of the area.

leave a plan in your vehicle on the seat face down others may just want your vehicle.

 

 

do you have lights extra batteries

 

All I can say when I was young all in my pockets was

a sod buster knife

a zippo lighter kept it full, had a can of lighter fluid in the truck inside the lighter 1/2 dozen flints

and a 38 special model 10 S&W and a pocket full of shells, extra box in the truck

old web belt holster and a few pouches for odds and ends.

a pair of binoculars

military poncho and a wool blanket denim jacket leather gloves

always had a couple tubes of crackers and some potted meat and some hard candy

some mustard sardines and can of coffee

A carton of cigarettes would take 2 if I left the truck.

a flask of crown royal bottle behind the seat.

bull whip, rope, and a rifle 22 bolt winchester shells behind the seat.

was 15 and did not have a license.

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(1) I think everyone has made some good comments....it would be prudent to keep them in mind.

(2) Considering there are more accidents in the house and within 5 miles of home than we want to think about, it is wise to have OH SHIT supplies on hand when we are out in the middle of no where. We certainly hope not to need them, but having them could mean the difference between minor inconvenience and being carried out in a body bag.

(3) Prepare for the worst, hope for the best and enjoy the moment.

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(1) I think everyone has made some good comments....it would be prudent to keep them in mind.

(2) Considering there are more accidents in the house and within 5 miles of home than we want to think about, it is wise to have OH SHIT supplies on hand when we are out in the middle of no where. We certainly hope not to need them, but having them could mean the difference between minor inconvenience and being carried out in a body bag.

(3) Prepare for the worst, hope for the best and enjoy the moment.

 

Partsman,

True. When I fell in the backyard and shattered my heel, had I been alone I'd have been in real trouble. I'd left my cell phone inside. My mother fell and broke her hip in the yard and was there for almost 2 hours before she was discovered. Always have your cell with you. Always have a plan B because Plan A won't work and Murphy was a bloody optimist.

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