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John

Bug-In Castle Defense

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John,

Depending on what the SHTF (Schumer (as in Chuck Schumer - jerk liberal senator) Ht The Fan) event is you may have anywhere from 0 hours to 48 hours after TSHTF event. If not gone by then, I think you are stuck for at least 2 weeks. During a hurricane evacuation around here, they tend to pull the trigger on the evacuation 24 hours or less before land fall. If you wait until they call it you're in traffic when the storm hits! During Rita (which missed Houston) it was a 22 hour drive to Dallas and people died during the evacuation. Oh, the storm missed us. Deciding when to go needs to be made in the comfort of your favorite chair while consuming an adult beverage with your team. Then don't second guess it. Some things are like a gun, when you pull the trigger you do not change your mind. As a pilot, I learned that the decision to take a missed approach and go around is irrevocable. Of the dozen or so accidents I investigated, about a third were pilots who decided to go miss and then changed their minds.

As to the group, if at all possible try an extended test run. It might save everyone a lot of heartburn in a real event. During Ike I had my mother-in-law in the house. The stress was huge. She liked to just stand in the fridge and look to see what was there. Without power when the door opened, the gen ran. We had a plan for one opening a day but she blew that. The constant complaining about no TV, no A/C, why can't my cat come out of my room (I didn't help - "go ahead, let him out, the dogs need the exercise and extra protein" - my wife still loves me thought) why won't you drive me home, taking people food for that cat ... I was a wreck. If it had been TEOTWAWKI the cat would have been out side to fend for itself and I would have put locks on fridge etc. As it was, I knew it was only a couple of weeks but it seemed like months!

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Default,

looks pretty good. I think I'd not have my shelter under my crops as that is tractor country. Closer to the house (makes it more accessible as a tornado shelter if that is a concern) and maybe under a chicken coop or barn might serve better for fast access and less impact from roots, rain, weight etc. One other thing, a storm shelter doesn't need a back door, but if at all possible, I'd have an escape tunnel from my bunker to the edge of my property with a hidden exit. Just so as not to get trapped in the bunker. Just a thought.

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Just a thought. Most houses are stick-built with walls that bullets will easily go through. Putting up a partial block or brick wall on the ourside of the walls, up to the level of the bottom of the windows (the top can be disguised with a flower box) will offer a bullet-proof level for defence.

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Sorry if this was stated before, I didn't read through everyone's post. I think that thinking in terms of just your home is pointless. You will not have the manpower to even maintain lookouts let alone defend, and high ground advantages are removed by the ease with which bullets pass through home walls. I used to plan on having a couple of families come over to my home and set up our castle. It wouldn't have worked due to man power constraints. I live in an area just north of Los Angeles with 1.7million people in it. My immediate surroundings hold 20,000. "the valley" holds very few escape routes, but I live within a few miles of a trail that leads into a desolate (and probably well trafficked if SHTF) mountain range. Frankly, we are in a big prison. What if the "wolves" come? Lets pretend that I actually succeed at defending just my property limits... but they attack the 80yr old woman across the street? If we think just in terms of our families and our selves we won't have the manpower to defend ourselves and we will watch our neighbors suffer. Ever heard of the Mosin Nagant and a box of surplus ammunition? BUY SEVERAL. My plan is to set up at minimum roadblocks on either end of my street, with an over-watch position on my rooftop, security/supply patrol up and down the 300yd street, and have a QRF. I could do that if I incorporated my neighbors into the plan. My neighborhood within major boulevards (the convenient 1 mile x 1 mile square the city planners created) could be defended with about 100 people, planning for 8 hour shifts. The population density provides far more than that. It's time to circle the wagons people. Call me naive if you will, but making a difference in others lives matters more to me than maintaining my heartbeat.

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John Doe: I like your line of thinking. I live in a fairly big neighborhood but don't know that many people well outside of the 5-6 houses right around me. I have more than a little concern about exposing myself to others with my interest in prepping especially in terms of stores and gear. What usually happens is you tell and neighbor and without concern they tell somebody else, who may mention even elsewhere. Sooner or later it lands on the ears of somebody who could target the house for investigation, SHTF or not. Yep, that's the definition of paranoia. So be it. I'm not that close to anybody that I would want to weather a major event with except one friend nearly 30 miles away that is more self-sufficient than me with a garden, chickens producing eggs, rabbits, and a working shop. My next door neighbors would not have a clue. I do think though if a neighborhood or one cul-de-sac would pard up they could repell outsiders. I'll keep working on that theory.

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One way to understand what you may need to defend your house is to roll-play. Think like a Perp. Go out to the street, look at your house - look for the vulnerabilities - look for likely places where the homeowner (remember, in this assessment you are the Perp.) will likely have his strongest defenses. And then mentally lay out a plan to break into it - don't attack the strong points, attack the vulnerabilities. To be more objective in your assessment, practice this roll-play on other houses also. To defend against a Perp, think like one (not permanently - just for the assessment).

Edited by LivingGray
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One way to understand what you may need to defend your house is to roll-play. QUOTE]

 

Oops! Sorry about the mispelling - "roll-playing" I was typing faster than I was thinking. Role-playing is the right word. One could roll-play too (could be a lot of fun, depending on who one is roll-playing with) but that's not what I was describing.

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Default,

looks pretty good. I think I'd not have my shelter under my crops as that is tractor country. Closer to the house (makes it more accessible as a tornado shelter if that is a concern) and maybe under a chicken coop or barn might serve better for fast access and less impact from roots, rain, weight etc. One other thing, a storm shelter doesn't need a back door, but if at all possible, I'd have an escape tunnel from my bunker to the edge of my property with a hidden exit. Just so as not to get trapped in the bunker. Just a thought.

 

Yeah I was going to put an exit to outside of my property, but was getting lazy lol. I would probably have one, and if I was super rich a mote with some deadly animal in it as well (100% serious). As for the idea of putting the shelters under a chicken coop, good thoughts, kinda makes sense now, I was thinking under my crops this way it would be completely hidden but this is all just brainstorming. I could probably hide them anywhere anyways.

 

My original plan included watchtowers were all the camera's were but I would need a lot of people to do that, If I were to do it I would have to have a bigger property line but that would be sweet.

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John Doe: Yep, that's the definition of paranoia.

 

John, Sometimes being paranoid keeps us alive. To quote a song by Buffalo Springfield, "paranoia strikes deep, into your life it will creep." I can tell you that without a doubt, being paranoid struck very deep and it kept us alive in Vietnam. In a critical altercation paranoia can be your best friend because it heightens your senses to a point of hyper-alertness. It may not be to our advantage to tell the neighborhood about our paranoia - just keep it there if we need it's benefits.

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First sorry if I repeat what others have said but after reading so many replies things start to blur together. First off, i'm surprised to hear when people say they only have 3-5 days of food. I don't know if they are only counting their "survival" food or all their food. Maybe I buy more than the average family guy buy not counting my suvival long term food but just the stuff in the cabinets would last at least a couple of weeks, even if it might be a bit bare. So if the event was only going to last four days I would do my best to bug in. I live in very urban setting but am minutes away from the country and the way to my BOL. If need be I would take the stake of 2x4s I keep in my basement and board up doors and windwows. Its a good idea to keep a good supply of nails around in case you loose power and can't use your power drill. I wold fill everything I could up with water, put out biohazard tape that I have to help keep people away. Also throw trash out and mess up the yard to make it look like the place has already had the once over. I would put most of our supplies especially weapons up on the second floor as the best and last defense post. In some ways for those who in live apartements, your almost in a better situation for defense because you don't have as many doors and windows to guard especially if you are above the first floor. Plus it would be pretty easy to block the the hallways or make them impassible. Plus there are alot more options for other apartments to check besides yours. If it becomes too heavy than well jump into the 4x4 hit the ramp literally in the front of our house and head to the bol.

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A few months back I lived at a place were management liked to enter unannounced and wouldn't let me change the locks so I started piling 200 pounds of sandbags in front of the door when I was home. They weren't happy about that. After a long argument over pressing charges for trespassing and fire hazards they let me out of my lease. But despite several more attempts by the maintenance workers to get past the sand bag blocked door I had my privacy till the end of the month.

 

Anyway sandbags are a quick way to barricade a door.

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First sorry if I repeat what others have said but after reading so many replies things start to blur together. First off, i'm surprised to hear when people say they only have 3-5 days of food.

Downtown Houston has NO grocery stores in it. Unless you drive to the suburbs you don't go to the grocery store. You eat out or order in but no groceries. A disaster waiting to happen.

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John, Sometimes being paranoid keeps us alive. To quote a song by Buffalo Springfield, "paranoia strikes deep, into your life it will creep." I can tell you that without a doubt, being paranoid struck very deep and it kept us alive in Vietnam. In a critical altercation paranoia can be your best friend because it heightens your senses to a point of hyper-alertness. It may not be to our advantage to tell the neighborhood about our paranoia - just keep it there if we need it's benefits.

A favorite scene in the movie Patton is Scott (as Patton) explaining that he was scared to death of being shot in the nose. Interesting how paranoia works; in Viet Nam it was all about me. Very, very personal - they wanted ME! It did help me stay alive but looking back on it, it was a tad strange - I guess getting shot at is always personal. At least for me (and apparently you) it was personal. And yes, it is still there and occasionally sticks its head out for a look see.

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If you live in a suburban setting, you might want to consider installing metal storm shutters. Not cheap, not if you get good ones, but entirely justified if you live near the coast. Won't stop a bullet, but does offer concealment, not cover, and might stop a Molotov cocktail from penetrating your window in case the naighbors get restless. I do encourage getting to know the neighbors, just so you can figure out which ones most likely to be a threat in case things break down. I am lucky to have some good neighbors next door, folks who we have already worked together with in hurricanes past.

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If you live in a suburban setting, you might want to consider installing metal storm shutters. Not cheap, not if you get good ones, but entirely justified if you live near the coast. Won't stop a bullet, but does offer concealment, not cover, and might stop a Molotov cocktail from penetrating your window in case the naighbors get restless. I do encourage getting to know the neighbors, just so you can figure out which ones most likely to be a threat in case things break down. I am lucky to have some good neighbors next door, folks who we have already worked together with in hurricanes past.

Bill,

I've been looking at those. A neighbor had them for Ike and it sure beat trying to put up plywood. Do you have a vendor recommendation?

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RollTex did the job on our house. They are a local company and fabricate the shutters to your specification. We found them on Angie's List and we could not have been more pleased. Not cheap, but in my opinion, worth the money. We went the plywood route before as well and this is WAY easier and safer. When it came time to install, these guys showed up in multiple cargo vans and humped it from dawn 'til dusk and cleaned up when they were done. When the shutters are not deployed, they are barely noticeable. Here is their website:

 

http://www.rolltexshutters.com/

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Thank you, sir. I'll check them out.

 

Since they are a local company, I don't know if you'd get anything for recommending them. If you want me to tell them who, you can send a private email to me using the private message tab and I'll pass along a phone number we can use to pass the information.

 

That looks like a good system. Now that the season is over, I might even get a deal.:)

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Thanks, Capt Bart. I appreciate the offer, but that is what we are here for, learning and sharing ideas. I've already picked up a ton of ideas off this forum, so glad to help out.

 

BTW, Rolltex seem to be very customer service oriented and we picked them due to their high ratings off Angie's List. I'll bet this would be an excellent time of year to get a good deal.

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Another item useful for hardening the home is very inexpensive (like $10 each) and easy to use. These come in a variety of trade names but is simply a "door stop" arm that connects from the door handle to the floor, functioning like putting a chair under the knob. They really work, at least from the prospective of slowing a would be home invader for a minute or more. Yes, they can batter down the door or break off the door knob, but in the meantime you have warning and a chance to react. As another poster pointed out, the best defense is a layered defense, and these little arms could be just the thing.

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I plan to Bug In as long as possible. I don't want to live in a tarp. I have some of the same thoughts as you. My wife knows how to shoot every weapon I have, she doesn't like it but she does. I try to think in threes. Like you I have gas and have never lost it. BUT if the SHTF I figure that the pump stations will stop pumping. No more gas. I also try to get ready in-case the dollar falls and theirs no money worth a crap. Or times are so bad I can't work and pay the bills. So I have a old cast iron heater and stove pipe in a shed just in-case I need it for heating and cooking. I have woods on my land so I can get that for some time.

I keep storing food and plan on another garden this year, but if It hits next year I figure the hungry people will be in the garden. Unless I plan on killing everyone that is hungry and looking for food The garden will not last. If SHTF and their is a garden it would be a flag I HAVE FOOD

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I have a similar problem, 3 doors and 13 windows, not too far from a major road and close to a irrigation ditch which would draw people. I've given this quite a bit of thought and came up with this: Make it look like it's ALREADY been ransacked. Throw out a bunch of stuff, clothes, chair, whatever. Hopefully if they thing there is nothing left, they'll move on. Thoughts/ideas???

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