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Dangerwolfe

BBIB or Bug Back In Bag - Prepping a Camelbak

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Guest survival101

Hi, Danger. Good pack! Picked up some tips from you, thanks. With regard to food, we do the same as the others, with high calorie meal bars, and some camp meals in a pouch. I have also packed individual tuna packets, packed in vegetable oil. I grew up eating tuna when traveling and camping. It has tons of protein and the oil provides fat. If you get the Safflower Oil pack it tastes great and doesn't contain "bad fats" which if I remember correctly are trans-fatty acids. If you or someone in your party has a blood sugar issue, this is a very good food to carry with you. Strenuous exercise such as hiking, carrying an unaccustomed weight, can exacerbate blood sugar issues. Not a bad idea to carry a couple of individual packs of peanuts, if no one in your party has an allergy.

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Hi, Danger. Good pack! Picked up some tips from you, thanks. With regard to food, we do the same as the others, with high calorie meal bars, and some camp meals in a pouch. I have also packed individual tuna packets, packed in vegetable oil. I grew up eating tuna when traveling and camping. It has tons of protein and the oil provides fat. If you get the Safflower Oil pack it tastes great and doesn't contain "bad fats" which if I remember correctly are trans-fatty acids. If you or someone in your party has a blood sugar issue, this is a very good food to carry with you. Strenuous exercise such as hiking, carrying an unaccustomed weight, can exacerbate blood sugar issues. Not a bad idea to carry a couple of individual packs of peanuts, if no one in your party has an allergy.

 

Hi 101,

 

Thanks for the Kudos, I really read up before I started out and it paid off.

 

I consider bailing wire and a needle-nosed pliers basic and essential, very underrated as potential survival gear. At home I use bailing wire all the time to attach anything and fix all kinds of stuff. Plus you can easily bend up other tools like a fire proof frame to cook on, fishing hooks, trap parts, etc. on and on....

 

Great food ideas; never thought about tuna but certainly have eaten my share right out of the can....peanut packs are also a great and cheap idea.

 

Regards,

 

Wolfe

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Ok, for food ideas you have already had some excellent ideas. A couple more would be the dehydrated backpacking meals if you want to go as light as possible. Someone mentioned peanuts, another good option, but I would go with trail mix instead personally. I make my own, a mix of peanuts, cashews, almonds, MM's, raisins, and dried cranberries. I guess I dont know this for sure, but I think that a mix like that would provide a little better variety of nutrition.

 

You also said that handguns arent legal in France. Are rifles, shotguns, or submachine guns legal? (just wondering what you could legally own) Anyway, something to consider, if your finances permit would be gold/silver coins. If your hoping to buy a handgun after some SHTF event, I would go with gold coins. And I would have at least 4x what a gun normally costs. Because lets face it, people are greedy. If its getting nasty in the world, people will be selling guns for much more than they are worth right now. And if your trying to buy a 'black market' type of firearm, you may need to go 10x or more what they are worth.

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Danger, nice packs. How old are your children? I would consider maybe small Camelbaks for them as well and add some vital extras to theirs for spares like multi tools, Swiss Army Knives (with magnifying lenses), water purification tablets, fire tinder, etc that won't overload them if they are young but if capable, they will add to your tools.

I would also look into some whole food multi vitamins just in case you do have to go without eating a couple days. They won't take away the hunger pangs, but can keep you nourished in an emergency.

I personally carry 2 US military ponchos which can be used to make shelter or rain protection. They are lightweight and very multi purpose. If you don't carry pup tent poles, you can always run para cord/twine between trees to form a "tent" and poncho liners are great light weight blankets.

You can also use the current Camelbaks as your kids BBIBs once and if you do purchase bigger BOBs for you and your wife.

Edited by Regulator5
double checked list and seen maps and compass

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Ok, for food ideas you have already had some excellent ideas. A couple more would be the dehydrated backpacking meals if you want to go as light as possible. Someone mentioned peanuts, another good option, but I would go with trail mix instead personally. I make my own, a mix of peanuts, cashews, almonds, MM's, raisins, and dried cranberries. I guess I dont know this for sure, but I think that a mix like that would provide a little better variety of nutrition.

 

You also said that handguns arent legal in France. Are rifles, shotguns, or submachine guns legal? (just wondering what you could legally own) Anyway, something to consider, if your finances permit would be gold/silver coins. If your hoping to buy a handgun after some SHTF event, I would go with gold coins. And I would have at least 4x what a gun normally costs. Because lets face it, people are greedy. If its getting nasty in the world, people will be selling guns for much more than they are worth right now. And if your trying to buy a 'black market' type of firearm, you may need to go 10x or more what they are worth.

 

Hi Schoeny, thanks for the feedback and ideas.

 

Yes, light as possible is the idea. What I'm learning is that there seems to be many "nice to haves" but not "need to haves" that add lots of weight and bulk, tents and stoves for example and even food. I'm reading up on what's edible locally and building lean-to's etc from the local foliage and how to make things I might need quickly out of junk I find. I don't want to be carrying a 50lb pack in a SHFT situ. Trail mix is a winner definitely.

 

Again, I'm planning to Bug Back In a week's time if we are away from home or forced to leave for a short duration, or just in transit to a Plan B location ....but can extend if needed. I don't plan on spending months in the bush or on the road for Plan A....but will have the knowledge and minimal tooling to do it.

 

Guns in France are owned only by criminals and police short of single shot shotguns, etc. There are "shooting clubs" where it may be possible to at least practice with handguns but I will need to find out more. Here is what I dug up so far:

 

"A pre-requisite for the legal acquisition of arms in France is belonging to gun club for a minimum period of at least 6 months. Then you can apply to have a license to bear an arm and to transport them or to keep them at home under strict conditions, including the requirement for them to be kept in a safe under lock and key. The President of the Club will then have to give his opinion as to the suitability of the candidate. But first an application has to be made to the local prefecture (police authority) with a mountain of paperwork involved. That said, few applications are refused. In this neck of the woods there are some 2000 registered gun club members in the department of the Hérault, 3 times that amount in the larger region of the Languedoc-Roussillon and some 140,000 in France as a whole. "

 

So it seems like it's possible but definitely a slow and political process. I am not yet a citizen so that might also be a requirement. Coins are a very good idea also!

 

Wolfe

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Hi Regulator,

 

My kids are 7 and 9. Indeed, I making two identical camel baks and will take my son out into the forests nearby to teach him all I can. However, it's a very good idea that everyone have a camel bak and I may just get a couple more later on. 4-15lb packs are so much easier to transport than 1 60lb pack, could not agree more. I could lighten up the one for the 7 year old and carry a bit more weight myself.

 

Did pick up a couple multi-tool Leatherman knock-offs. They are cheap but fit well inside the bags. I also carry a swiss army Midnight Manager on my keychain, absolutely the perfect tool and always passes airport security no matter what country.

 

Military Ponchos are a good idea. I'm still traveling....but when I finally get back I'll pick up the rest of what I need to finish the BIBBs, practice in the back yard, then off to the woods for a test drive...

 

Wolfe

Edited by Dangerwolfe

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I would think about putting "child comfort" items in the kids bags. Things that would add peace of mind to them. Snacks, their own compass, first aid kit and other items that they think of. Maybe rain gear and a jacket. A 10 or 15 lbs pack of child specific gear could be very helpful to long term (1-2 weeks) road trip. Most kids in the 7-9 years old range could hack carting around that weight. You could still carry the 40 lb pack with the major kit in it. Any gear that you have with you helps and the kids would be contributing to family survival.

Edited by Ben228
Damn auto-correct!

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Id think, included in that 10-15lb child pack, include each a set of thier own basic survival stuff or like, replacment water-filter for your BOB stuff, give em their own emergency water-filter/purifier and rations and whistle.

 

When young in Rural Kentucky, my friends and I had the best time in the woods, playing with our GI JOE Walkytalkys.

Edited by NavyVet_77

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Hi Ben,

 

Thanks for your suggestions. For rain gear, first and for most the clothing we'll have shall all be fast drying, breathable high-tech stuff or wool, etc. so even if you do get wet, like a dog's fur you still stay warm and dry out pretty quickly. Indeed, will have the hight tech jackets with hood. That's another project though....

 

I will definitely have comfort items in a larger and true BOB if I need to implement Plan B then yes, perhaps Nintendo DS or something like that. So far, I've really tried to steer my kids away from vid games to the extent possible though....I'm really trying to keep the weight down on the BBIB so none of these bags will weigh over 15-20 lbs.

 

The BBIB is just to get us home inside of a week or two and hopefully not stay out for months. I'm pretty creative so if needed I will carve up/make some toys, instruments, dolls, etc, but I think the ordeal of getting back home will keep all of us pretty occupied....

 

Wolfe

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http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreation/Packs/2012-Scout.aspx

 

DW, here is a link to a Camelbak designed for youngsters. Just in case you haven't found any and want to check it out.

 

Thanks regulator. We'll see how the 9 year old handles the full-size Camelbak Mule for a day or two in the woods and day long hikes. One time I returned off of a business trip and my wife had signed us up for a 10 km hike the same day..... So right after she picked me up from the train station off we went.....

 

I must say I was really impressed that my 6 year old daughter (at the time) walked it no problem! She wasn't carrying anything though. To this end, we always stress fitness and healthy eating in our family, no fatties or layabouts. We take the kids to and from school by bike every day, etc. They are used to physical effort.

 

Wolfe

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Hey Wolfe,

 

I was thinking more along the lines of a Mil-Pack Convoy idea. Spread the vital eguipment out so the loss of any one ship/truck doesn't scuttle the whole mission because all of something was lost. Put some of the water purification in each of the packs as well as some of all mission critical items.

 

I was thinking non-electronic toys or other comfort items for the kids in their packs. Kids are resilient and all of that but they are going to need comforting to deal with the thing that drove you out in the first place. How fast can you travel with a catatonic child on each arm? You and your wife will have your hands full dealing with the disaster as it is, high functioning kids can only help. Hell I'd throw some adult comfort items in as well.

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Hey Wolfe,

 

I was thinking more along the lines of a Mil-Pack Convoy idea. Spread the vital eguipment out so the loss of any one ship/truck doesn't scuttle the whole mission because all of something was lost. Put some of the water purification in each of the packs as well as some of all mission critical items.

 

I was thinking non-electronic toys or other comfort items for the kids in their packs. Kids are resilient and all of that but they are going to need comforting to deal with the thing that drove you out in the first place. How fast can you travel with a catatonic child on each arm? You and your wife will have your hands full dealing with the disaster as it is, high functioning kids can only help. Hell I'd throw some adult comfort items in as well.

 

Thanks for the additional input Ben. That's a good idea to spread out the vital stuff. For now I'm just creating two identical bags.

 

Regarding confort I could not agree more. Here's a link to a fabulous very compact short term survival kit put together by this girl. Yep, she's definitely a partier LOL, or a "sporting girl" as the English call them, but her kit takes into consideration "distractions" and ways to keep your mood up. I will use several of her ideas including the tiny iPods and headphones with music, books and bedtime stories for the kids. Tons of great ideas here.

 

Check it out, just excellent:

 

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf2Np19leo0

 

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEgbIDIBkyg&feature=relmfu

 

Wolfe

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