Sign in to follow this  
Partsman

Keeping Your BOV Ready TO Roll

Recommended Posts

One of the first upgrades I do is replace headlights with higher output units. I do this for the simple reason that I like to see as much as possible when traveling at night. You can find several levels of upgrades at your local parts store. I would suggest staying with a white light so as to not add to your foot print. The blue lights and HID units rub many the wrong way .... so I avoid them. /QUOTE]

 

I just wanted to chime in on headlights.. HID conversion kits are usually sold under legitimate company names. However these companies do not endorse the use of conversion from halogen housing to HID. You can thank the Chinese for flooding the market with company rip offs. If you look at the filament in a halogen bulb you will notice the light is around a the elongated filament. Your halogen housing is designed to focus this type of light source. A HID bulb produces light from the arc between two electrodes and the light is a crescent moon at the point of the bulb. This light will not focus in a halogen bulb housing.

When you are driving at night you can see the difference of cars coming towards you. A headlight that is truly HID will have small tight round pattern, where the retro kits will be blue blobs of unfocused light.

Personal i have gone to 80/100 halogen bulbs. Yes these are hotter bulbs. it requires that first you have you lights aimed correctly. You need to replace the bulb connector to a high temp plug. Last thing to have done is replace your wiring to the lights with higher gauge wire.

With two driving lights and this upgraded bulb set up i can bring 400 watts of focused light on the trails when needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FOR YEARS, I carried extra gas in the truck. until I became a full time pilot/flag car driver and am on the road for over a 1,000 miles or more each week. Once you see a passenger car that got rear-ended, carrying 5 gal of "lawnmower fuel", burn the family to death and listened to them scream horribly, you will rethink this idea. It is a terrible price to pay. I do not like traveling the road without extra fuel, leave alone for survival issues, however, to compensate, I now carry an EMPTY 2.5 plastic fuel container, and a good quality, manual siphon set... there will be abandoned cars left behind when people take one and leave the other (I hope). And for your sake, please keep fuel outside your home and garage! Put it in a outside barrel or a simple box with air holes... it's not convenient but you will be alive to deal with the hassle. Keep Safe PLS

Good post.

 

Always keep your vehicle gassed up, with full gas cans in the back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YES, SWITCH TO SYNTHETIC, if your car is "young enough".. Common guidelines are that if you have too high a mileage, and switch, you MIGHT blow seals and other nasty things. There are those that will say otherwise, and I will not argue the point. If in doubt, don't. I just started a 35,000 honda accord with Amsol, but the mechanic (though he would have made a profit), strongly advised me on doing our Murano since it was up to 125,000 on conventional. His attitude was "let's not take a chance, I don't want to have you expecting me to change seals because of this"..

 

DURATION OF OILS: In an emergency, you can push your BOV another 2,000 miles without blowing it up. It will not pamper your engine, but you are not likely to travel more than 500 miles before you have to stop anyway. Wherever you think you are going, it has to be within a tankful of gas, and that includes enough for freeway jams, and hours and hours of idling. Example: Yesterday, south of Washington, DC, I crept 23 miles... took me 2 hours by the watch! If that had been an "evacuation" we would all be dead! Oil changes would not have been a concern. BUT KEEP YOURS UP TO DATE, and move forward.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

GREAT ADVISE, but for those that can't do the headlight conversion and wiring (or afford to pay for it), you can at least look into extra "off-road" lights available everywhere. If you have a plastic bumper, or a streamlined car that you just can't mount those type of light, look into a magnetic set of trailer lights. Remove the trailer lights, and replace them with the higher beam "off road" white lights. Kept handy, if you have to evacuate, put them on the roof and GO. REMEMBER, In a true "emergency", nothing is illegal! You can use whatever you have to evacuate and survive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

EXIT is absolutely right! You can really do 25K in a pinch.

Again though, oils are important, but fuel or the ability to find some, or have some "hidden" along your route is paramount if you MUST go further than one tankful of fuel.

Partsman,

 

I'm also a firm believer in Amsoil products. I put only Amsoil in my car. I get Oil at a discount from them as a preferred customer too. I will probably use their products for the rest of my life.

 

My best friend is an automotive Master Tech. He was the one who introduced me to Amsoil and I can't believe I didn't know about them earlier.

 

I love the fact that I can get 15,000 miles (or even 25,000) out of one oil change. I change at 15,000 just to be safe but its nice to know the oil is rated up to 25k. The oil has also impressed me in other areas. My car use to leak a lot of oil, even since I switched to Amsoil it has leaked much slower. The car also seems to drive better (although that might just be my butt dyno).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PARTSMAN IS RIGHT AGAIN AS USUAL: Folks, anyone can afford $5 for the smaller headband led lights at Lowes, WalMart, etc. We tried one, and we had regular lights all over the homestead; and now we have at least 8 of these things everywhere! All glove boxes in five vehicles, even the RV (2 inside and one move in the toolbox). For anything hands free, they are tops! And they last for a LONG TIME!

One of the first upgrades I do is replace headlights with higher output units. I do this for the simple reason that I like to see as much as possible when traveling at night. You can find several levels of upgrades at your local parts store. I would suggest staying with a white light so as to not add to your foot print. The blue lights and HID units rub many the wrong way .... so I avoid them. You may want to consider adding additional lighting for working at night .... both to the front and rear of the vehicle.....even side lights are useful. All you have to do is observe the alley lights that are now standard on the police light bars. Look at the new led lights as they offer great output with lower draw....which should increase the life of the wiring and switches.

 

Another place I would look to upgrade would be under hood lighting. If you're working on your vehicle at night some low draw lighting mounted in the right place would be more helpful that trying to hold a flashlight while fixing the problem. A 12 volt flourescent stick light would be one possibility or maybe some of the light kits like U have seen used on cycles or show cars would be adaptable to this use. If nothing else toss a headband light in the glove box along with an extra set of batteries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UPDATE ON LONGEVITY USING FUEL STABILIZERS: Our experiments showed, and now our firm procedure is that we can store 50 gallons in a plastic 55gal barrel for one year and not miss a beat when we put it in the engines to run. (ps: using blue plastic eliminates rust and most condensation contaminates) This is with Sta-bil product. I have not stock ownership in this product, but it does work for us. Another is "Sea-foam". Available at Advance and others. We store several 55 gal barrels (way out from the dwellings) in a shed to keep direct sunlight and radiate heat off them, with all windows open. Barrels are NOT vented! (This is why you only put in 50 gals of fuel) While bottle instructions say you can add more Sta-bil to the barrel each year to extend use, (This adds to your overall fuel dump cost of course, we choose to begin using barrel #1, and let #2-5 ride it out. When barrel #1 is empty, we refill and retreat it and move on to #2, etc. while this is also a "rotation", it makes us comfortable that we have 250 gals for shelter-in-place, that at any given moment; WE HAVE A FULL YEAR EXTENDED LIFE EXPECTANCY ON HAND and likely longer. 250 gals would be used up within a year, even with conservative generator or evacuation issues. Yes, to store bulk fuel, it's a lot of money sitting around, but at least the money in not is some bank that I can't get it out of in an emergency!

Great idea NovicePrepper! Fuel would be one of the first things to get hard to get, be it gasoline or diesel.

Many preppers have fuel cache. While this is a good idea, it is of maximum importance to rotate the fuel. Do Not stock pile fuel for long periods. Gasoline more than diesel has a shelf life that can be only a few weeks ...depending on the temperature and humidity. I presonally use Sta-Bil Marine Formula in both my reserve fuel and when I fill up on the road. You can stabalize gasoline for several months with this stuff. Diesel is a bit different....you have got to keep moisture out of your tanks! If you ever get stuff growing in your tank(s) you will regret it.....I know several people who have had this happen and it is bad news. I recommend using Bio-Kleen by Power Service Products in your diesel. You may want to keep a supply of thier 911 product if you are are in cold country as it is good for gelling problems. Remember ROTATE your fuel reserves...20 gallons in the truck twenty gallons back in the cans.

Edited by Dig Deeper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the info Dig Deeper. If you think about it the possiblilty of actually saving on per gallon costs could be a possiblilty. That is assuming you purchased fuel when the price per gallon was down and was able to work through a year replacing as you use it. Anyone know where there would be a graph of fuel costs over time .... could give us best times of year to buy.

 

Anyone else got some historical data to share? Come guys & gals Dig Deeper shurely isn't the only one who is doing this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the info Dig Deeper. If you think about it the possiblilty of actually saving on per gallon costs could be a possiblilty. That is assuming you purchased fuel when the price per gallon was down and was able to work through a year replacing as you use it. Anyone know where there would be a graph of fuel costs over time .... could give us best times of year to buy.

 

Anyone else got some historical data to share? Come guys & gals Dig Deeper shurely isn't the only one who is doing this.

 

this might help...............

http://gasbuddy.com/gb_retail_price_chart.aspx

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This might be a little off target but it does have to do with your BOV. In every vehicle I own I put a hand-pump siphon with a long hose. True, gas might be harder to find but broken down vehicles will have gas and we need to be ready to obtain it however we can. Also, you might want to have some sort of container in case you can’t take the gas from the other car and into your tank.

 

Also, I have a very strong flashlight in each vehicle. They are all rated at over 220 lumens. You never know where your BOV might break down and you’ll need a strong and possibly blinding potable light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This might be a little off target but it does have to do with your BOV. In every vehicle I own I put a hand-pump siphon with a long hose.
you might want to check your local

laws as carrying those implements is illegal in some jurisdictions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wally, only if one gets caught! ;) I have it in my bug out bag and its purpose is obvious. When I last got stopped, the thing that concerned the officer least was a pump siphon. I think he was more concerned with all the 'other' things I told him I was carrying in the form of self-protect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I am a glutton for punishment but here goes.....Hydrogen generators for increasing fuel milage ..... anyone want to share their experiences?

 

Now ...I know someone has tried this..... I know guys who have set these systems up and also continue to run across articles on them in various magazines that I get. SO tell us... OK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wally, only if one gets caught! ;) I have it in my bug out bag and its purpose is obvious. When I last got stopped, the thing that concerned the officer least was a pump siphon. I think he was more concerned with all the 'other' things I told him I was carrying in the form of self-protect.

 

i go for the hammer, punch and dip pan method. but i do wonder how one gets gas from gas station if the power grid goes down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i go for the hammer, punch and dip pan method. but i do wonder how one gets gas from gas station if the power grid goes down.

 

I think Warrior had something in his kit for that. You may want to check out NorthernTool.com as I think they have a 12 volt pump that would work for that to. You could even take a regular add-on style electric fuel pump and rig something you could drop down the fill pipe into the tank....as I remember it's only about 10 to 12 feet to the bottom. A roll of hose, a roll of insulated wire, two gator clips and a hose clamp should put you in business. Just remember the pump pushes fuel so it goes down the pipe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wally brought up a good point...in many areas you can get in trouble for having "tools of the trade" ie burglary. Now we all know a prybar and a slidehammer and a syphon hose are useful things to have in an emergency it is a good idea to keep them in a locked tool box so as to not get harrassed by the powers that be. Keep in mind that a 4-way lug wrench with a 3 or 4 foot pipe next to it is a tool to get the tire off when some idiot over tightened your lug nuts and the bulb for your outboard motors fuel line can be attached to the roll of hose you bought to have at the shop. Remember rule one ... Planning is everything .... a good reason trumps a suspicious outlook.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Really need an edit button! Note to last post. They list two different "cans" # 86619 is with pull outs and # 86622 the top flips up to give full access to the can. For some reason they have both pictured in one version of the catalog but not the other. I have not priced these yet but hope they don't require selling any children to get them ... my 22 yr. old airman said she was not for sale or trade .... never hurts to ask.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • This is a great inspiring article. I am pretty much pleased with your good work. You put really very helpful information.
       
    • here is the survival coupons codes to get a amazing material of survival struggling 
    • Hey all, This is sort of cool (okay really cool) and maybe some of you have heard about it because it's been plastered over FOX and mentioned by POTUS as well as other conservative-leaning news people (Huckabee, Diamond/Silk, Candace Owens, Mark Levin, etc..) and politicians. #walkaway is a movement based mostly on social media. Started last year, by Brandon Straka (pronounced Strawk - like "straw" with a "k"). He's a former 2016 HRC-voting hair stylist, from NE, now in NYC, homosexual, liberal who began to question the MSM and what he was hearing. He got really frustrated as he began to do his own research. Anyway, after having his own awakening to the lies of MSM he had been following, he began an online testimonial campaign in which former liberals can post their #walkaway stories, written or video. Many are now on the "Trump Train." Many have simply left the Left. Still, others have always been non-Left and are members in support. The amazing thing is how many different people from all walks of life are beginning to wake up. Lots are not conservative on all issues, but all have a love for the USA and dislike the demonization of open political and social thinkers and speakers. This group gives solace to people scared to voice their conservative opinions or views for fear of negative professional or personal responses. It now has budding smaller groups in all 50 states and an online discussion group where people discuss current topics or issues (WITH no vitriol, gasp).  Here's the original video from Brandon.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=51UGcghHZsk This man, Brandon has a unique, stylish, well-articulated voice to help move people "in hiding" out into the open and not be silenced. Pretty much any video Brandon does is great. Here is the Facebook page: www.facebook.com/groups/OFFICIALwalkawaycampaign/ As I see fights erupt online, I simply leave #walkaway in the comments. Brandon has a goal of 1 million members! The liberal media has called this campaign "Russian Bots" and "paid actors." It's not!!!        
    • thanks to all who  have served or are serving our great country....243 years in the making....   Trump did a good job today thanking each branch of our military and a long time coming salute to the coast guard too....
    • I can imagine food prices going up this Fall or Winter. Corn is used for live stock feed, & us humans consume a lot of corn based products, as well as corn based biofuel. I’ve been keeping a watchful eye on the mid-west of America, which is flooded by water. Where corn  & other crops are normally grown there. Farmers are quite worried about this years growing season. Time to stock up on extra food if you can, if you haven’t already. Stack it high, stack it deep. Store the foods that you normally eat. What ever the  amount of food you’ve stored,  try to double it if possible. Better extra safe, than sorry.