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Partsman

Keeping Your BOV Ready TO Roll

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The job of keeping your BOV as well as your other vehicles as road worthy as possible is a day to day task. With all the things we all have on own minds it is all too easy to forget to do the checkups and services our vehicles require to continue doing the job we need them to do. There are several ways to keep up with what needs doing, when it needs to be done,and what will be needed to do it. From a hard copy list to a computer spread sheet keeping up is something we must do if we expect the performance we all hope we will never need. I plan to touch on different parts of the puzzle as time allows. I welcome suggestings and your insight on the subject.

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Good post.

 

Always keep your vehicle gassed up, with full gas cans in the back.

Great idea NovicePrepper! Fuel would be one of the first things to get hard to get, be it gasoline or diesel.

Many preppers have fuel cache. While this is a good idea, it is of maximum importance to rotate the fuel. Do Not stock pile fuel for long periods. Gasoline more than diesel has a shelf life that can be only a few weeks ...depending on the temperature and humidity. I presonally use Sta-Bil Marine Formula in both my reserve fuel and when I fill up on the road. You can stabalize gasoline for several months with this stuff. Diesel is a bit different....you have got to keep moisture out of your tanks! If you ever get stuff growing in your tank(s) you will regret it.....I know several people who have had this happen and it is bad news. I recommend using Bio-Kleen by Power Service Products in your diesel. You may want to keep a supply of thier 911 product if you are are in cold country as it is good for gelling problems. Remember ROTATE your fuel reserves...20 gallons in the truck twenty gallons back in the cans.

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One of the first things to ask yourself....What do I know about my vehicle? What does it need to keep on keeping on? Do I have the parts and tools and know how to service my vehicle? Let us look at some of the items needed. Owners manual...interesting for everyday stuff but a factory service manual will break it down much better. On the parts side...do you have the basics? Lets list a few items... engine oil, transmission fluid, gear lube, brake fluid, grease, filters for air, fuel, transmission, cooling system, power steering system, and motor oil. Oh..don't forget brake shoes and or pads (maybe even want kits to repair the wheel cylinders and calipers). Plus electrical items such as fuses, terminal ends for wires, wire in several sizes, tape and or shrink tubing(get the good double wall stuff), crimping tool, wire cutter.

What other replacement parts will you need. Lets say normal wear and tear stuff. Wiper blades, fuel and water pumps, belts and hoses, antifreeze, wheel bearings and seals, u-joints, steering components, ...the list can get a bit long. You can slow the repair on the side of the trail/road by preventative maintenance and by upgrading the parts to HD as you work through the worn parts you find on the vehicle as you do your weekly, monthly, and yearly inspection/services. Lets keep tires for another day as they are a whole nother ball game.

So..Guys & Gals what did I forget...besides the needed tools that is.

Edited by Partsman

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Upgrade your BOV.

Additional trans/engine oil cooler.

Heavy duty suspension.

functional grille guard on trucks.

better lighting

better storage options

run flat tires

skid plates

reinforced bumpers

upgrade to high flow air filters with possible foam pre filter

less restrictive exhaust system and less noisy

ceramic brake pads

12v air pump

 

just a few things to look over.

 

great topic by the way.

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Let's take a short look at air filters and exhaust systems, since they have been mentioned...

 

There are people that say "oh yeah, just get a cold air intake system" which is fine, IF you know what a "kit" is designed for...

 

 

...usually separating a "less than knowledgeable" person from his or her hard earned cash. In MOST of those kits, they do nothing but allow MORE dirt into the engine, because, to "flow more air", these filters have BIGGER HOLES to allow more are to pass, and these holes allow bigger chunks of dirt past, causing excessive wear on valve seats, rings, and other parts.

 

The common claim of "more horsepower" and "greater fuel economy" is also a lie. Use the intelligence God has given and THINK about this-if this garbage was such a good idea, don't you think that we would use them in new cars as an OEM?

 

On the other side of the engine, low backpressure in an exhaust system can also cause failures, due to clogging of catalytic converters not heating up to destroy the particulate matter.

Edited by BobS

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Well, I must say great ideas awake. You have brought up several systems that can and should be upgraded. I hope to address them in future posts. BobS, I both agree and disagree with your view. There are bad intake systems and exhaust systems just as there are those that improve the air flow through the engine. Yes, improved air flow can help the performance of the engine. Should there be a focus on reducing dust infiltration to improve the length of engine life....Yes and Yes. Does it take priority with every kit ...No. You asked the question of "if they're so good why aren't they OEM" .... the simple answer is in many cases NOISE or emissions issues. Can we have our cake and eat it to? I beleave to a certain extent it is possible. It will take research and close study to determine the best products for your particular situation.

Edited by Partsman

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One point on run flat tires... they are a real beyatch to change off the wheel. I can change most truck tires (I have older trucks with 16 inch wheels) by hand without the tire machines shops use and you can do semi and tractor tires this way. Run flats, while they will get you farther from the area, will need replaced eventually if the vehicle keeps moving so extra wheels and tires will be required for long term maintenance/changing. I agree that they serve a great purpose and do it well.

Another thing would be to know what other makes and models' parts are compatible with your vehicle. It may be handy just being able to swap out the whole wheel and tire than breaking a tire down and reseating it if all you needed to do was swap out the entire "system". Some Ford and Dodge trucks were interchangable (96 Dodge and I used Ford wheels from a 80 Bronco for example to have off road and street tires).

Great thread Parts.

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BobS and Partsman

I am not a proponent of cold air intake systems. Yes cold air is more dense and allows for more oxygen and a better fuel burn. However the aluminum that is used in the tubing just transfers heat from the engine to the air intake. In my case i have used a K&n drop in filter with a custom foam pre-filter. I also did what is called a Gotts Mod on the intake. It was a ten dollar-45 minute project that made the intake a true 3 inch ID.

as for my ford exhaust system i removed the muffler which was too restrictive. I replaced it with a flow-master 18 inch muffler. No more noisy than the oem muffler but far less restrictive. What i have been able to achieve is better intake air flow and exhaust. Uncork both ends of the V8 and you will increase torque and horsepower. Exactly what you need to move a 7k pound vehicle plus its cargo.

my BOV is also my daily transport but i keep it Grey as not to draw attention.

Edited by awake

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BobS and Partsman

I am not a proponent of cold air intake systems. Yes cold air is more dense and allows for more oxygen and a better fuel burn. However the aluminum that is used in the tubing just transfers heat from the engine to the air intake. In my case i have used a K&n drop in filter with a custom foam pre-filter. I also did what is called a Gotts Mod on the intake. It was a ten dollar-45 minute project that made the intake a true 3 inch ID.

as for my ford exhaust system i removed the muffler which was too restrictive. I replaced it with a flow-master 18 inch muffler. No more noisy than the oem muffler but far less restrictive. What i have been able to achieve is better intake air flow and exhaust. Uncork both ends of the V8 and you will increase torque and horsepower. Exactly what you need to move a 7k pound vehicle plus its cargo.

my BOV is also my daily transport but i keep it Grey as not to draw attention.

 

Very good awake. What about giving us a description of the Gotts Mod or a link. I totally agree with the quiet muffler....out of sight could just as well be out of hearing out of mind. Rule One...NEVER draw attention to you and yours. Regulator5...good thoughts on the tire wheel situation...tools to break down and repair or swap out damaged tires plus a method of filling them with air should be part of the kit for sure. Say...A belt driven air compressor would be a good add on.....anyone ever see a A C compressor modified to become a air compressor? You are right certain Ford and Dodge rims are the same bolt pattern. The grey area is the size of the center hole in the rim... many forget about that and it is important if you are carrying a heavy load that the rim closely fit the OD of the hub for support, otherwise only the studs are toting the load. On a different note... I wonder who has or uses one of the power chips and what gains if any they have experienced.

Edited by Partsman

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Actually Partsman, the answer is no on both your noise and emissions points. I have run the certifications for Honda, Ford, Chrysler, and Toyota over the years for both NHTSA, EPA, JIS, and other govt agencies around the world, in addition to designing these systems for OEMs on both commercial and military vehicles for the last 35 years plus.

 

:)

 

No system has ever been certified (just little things like SAE standardized procedures trip up the trinkets and trash aftermarket industry) to surpass OEM systems because they don't work without hurting durability over the OEM systems.

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awake, that "less restrictive" exhaust will now allow your engine to run dirtier (the cat will take longer to heat up), will destroy the cat faster (due to the incomplete sulphur dioxide removal/conversion and plugging by carbon compounds), will corrode the system aft of the cat faster (due to higher sulphuric acid content when warming up), and, depending on your state, will earn you a fine for failure to pass emissions tests now.

 

It will take a while, but converting an engine from a 150,000 mile durability to under 100,000 means that exhaust system just cost you one third (or more) of you expected engine life.

 

Can you afford that?

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BobS.

can i afford this? yes. OEM exhaust is stainless and has 138K. I can do all the repair work myself and the parts are affordable. I deal with all sorts of metals everyday and wield as well. Down here in the south the exhaust systems like i have mentioned will be fine for 120k after installation. Based on the average mileage put on it, i will be on to my next BOV. If the cats give it up then i will replace all four of them with high flow aftermarket parts. Just think i might even replace the entire exhaust system from manifold back.You might believe in oem parts but for someone like me that worked for 14 years in a "stealership" i realize that no auto manufacturer builds all their own parts any more. They design them and send the orders out to have them built else where. I can buy 2 to 3 aftermarket parts for the cost of one oem part. Yes i can afford that.

 

Partsman

you asked about the Gotts mod. There are several good vids on youtube. Basically what it does is improve intake air volume. On my vehicle if you follow the intake route you find that it starts collecting air form the fender location. That tube has a id of 2.25 inches as it passes thru the fender. the rest of the tube is 3 inches id. You replace the bottleneck with piece of pvc, a rubber coupling and hose clamp. all items where available at a hardware store. ta da you now have a real 3 inch intake. More air in better/quicker throttle response.

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....and do you understand the different grades of stainless and the corrosion effects on each? As an analogy, you have just claimed that a .22 LR equals a .45 ACP JHP because both bullets contain lead.

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BTW-what part of my comment about my background was not clear-after 37 years of designing, building, testing, and developing military and civilian wheeled vehicles, I know who does what to whom and how often in this business. Please do not assume there aren't people that are not as limited in this area as many "mechanics".

 

My own limitations are in personal mobility requirements for bipeds. In other words, I damn near cannot walk anymore due to blown out knees from a juvenile belief in the infalibility of a parachute to open on command properly.

 

LOL

Edited by BobS

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The goal is (1) know our vehicle, (2) know what it takes to fix it, (3) have the parts it takes to fix it, (5) have the tools to fix it, (6) have the know-how to fix it, (7) know or learn what can be substituted in a situtation that may not get better. We can discuss pros and cons of OEM verse Aftermarket till Hell freezes over....will we be any better off? Not likely. What works now will be more important than what might be better in the long run. Yes, we want our equipment to go as long and as far as possible...but let us recognize the reality...feet could quickly become the only mode of transport. Most of us will (A) hunker down where we are or (B) move to a predetermined location and hunker down there. NOT going to be riding the roads sightseeing.

The vehicle will be used only as needed ....be it for transportation, moving stuff that fell or blew over, or as a power source to use communication equipment. Anyone wants to know...only got about 4 gallons of fuel... sorry cannot give you any and I cannot take you anywhere. Beleave me when I say this....doesn't matter is you have a 1000 gallon diesel tank buried behind the barn and and a full chicken house propane tank behind a false wall in the barn....DO NOT TELL A SINGLE PERSON especially a child.

Edited by Partsman

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O K forgive the rant but felt the need to focus. Yes, fuel stabalizer should be a part of the program....considering the state of the fuel supply these days you may want to do as I do and put it in everything parked or daily driver. Ethanol is BAD NEWS. Talk to anyone who works on small engines or on boat engines and you will get both ears full. For that reason I go for the extra insurance of having it in the tank of my truck as well as in my reserve fuel. I still suggest setting up a rotation schedule and not let the fuel get too much age on it. Gasoline doesn't like hot and humid and diesel will grow slime if condensation builds up in the storage tank. FILTER FILTER FILTER. Do everything you can to keep the fuel at a stable temperature...buried tanks with a roof over them is likely the best method...if you want to feed some CO2 in to push the air out that would likely prevent the humidity condensing in the tanks.....although that is overkill. I would get some "water tell" to put on the end of the gage stick to monitor a buried tank.

Edited by Partsman

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There are several pieces of information on standards used for testing operational parameters, but I am nitpicking, as I have seen and commented on that test and results obtained for two engine companies. Yes, to be fair, I was paid for my review of the study.

 

To cut to the short form answer, the test was specific in it's effect study, procedure, and produced valid results. The missing information in that 14 page thread was of no real interest to non-engineers or non-engine manufacturers.

 

Discounting the idiocy displayed by many of those posts, the test was both important for it's results as well as conclusions. Thankyou for referencing that information, as usually such a study is too technically oriented for the avarage person to evaluate from hearsay.

 

Short answer....ya done good Partsman.

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As I had said earlier, technical info and record keeping should be on the list. Hard copy as well as electronic will allow you to see what has been done and how to do what needs doing. I came across a free record keeping page you may be interested in looking at. http://www.mylilurl.com/defa it allows you to keep up with service work and even send yourself reminders of up coming service. While the hard copy records will likely be of more use if a situation resulting in a grid failure occurs, this should help us keep our vehicles ready until then. Something to think about would be part interchange manuals and parts spec manuals as well as a list of common parts for your vehicles. Most parts supply stores are on computer....both catalog and inventory....so it could be hard to figure out what fits what if the situation deteriorated far enough.

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One of the first upgrades I do is replace headlights with higher output units. I do this for the simple reason that I like to see as much as possible when traveling at night. You can find several levels of upgrades at your local parts store. I would suggest staying with a white light so as to not add to your foot print. The blue lights and HID units rub many the wrong way .... so I avoid them. You may want to consider adding additional lighting for working at night .... both to the front and rear of the vehicle.....even side lights are useful. All you have to do is observe the alley lights that are now standard on the police light bars. Look at the new led lights as they offer great output with lower draw....which should increase the life of the wiring and switches.

 

Another place I would look to upgrade would be under hood lighting. If you're working on your vehicle at night some low draw lighting mounted in the right place would be more helpful that trying to hold a flashlight while fixing the problem. A 12 volt flourescent stick light would be one possibility or maybe some of the light kits like U have seen used on cycles or show cars would be adaptable to this use. If nothing else toss a headband light in the glove box along with an extra set of batteries.

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I will be right up front.....am a beleaver in Amsoil lubricants.....I use them and I set up others to purchase (at a discount) for their use or if a business for resale. Is that the only product out there??? ..... No ..... But, I have used this since 1991... so I know it is a good company with a good product. Want to check it out visit me at Http://www.lubedealer.com/Partsmans-Site .... Nuff said.

 

The oil, transmission fluid, gear lube is the life blood of the vehicle....fuel provides the power but without good clean fluids....YOU WILL STOP SOONER THAN LATER. So, set up a regular maintenance program and just do it. What do you need to consider when changing fluids?

 

(1) What are the recommended specs? 0w20 or 15w40....or something in between for the engine. Transmission fluids are becoming more personalized (every mfg. wants a piece of the pie...so now they nearly all have their own recommended fluid) and in some cases it will have a substantial effect if you use the wrong fluid. Gear lubes are more forgiving...if you use one that is rated for the load and has a limited slip additive in it you will be OK most of the time (have to say that as there are some gear boxes with components in them that just don't like regular gear lube).

(2) How often should the fluids be changed? This is a grey area....so much depends on the use of the vehicle and the product being used as well as the filter system on the vehicle. As I have said FILTER FILTER FILTER....Clean fluids do their job better and longer. I suggest using premium full flow filter(s) plus a by-pass filter for the engine and adding an auxillary filter to the automatic transmission. As far as air filters, I would suggest a premium one with a foam over-wrap (especially if you are in a farming or desert area). Not a lot offered for manual trans or rear ends....But relocating the vent to a higher point should help if you need to do water crossings.

(3) Remember to inspect eveything else while you are under the vehicle...and grease any ujoints that have fittings as well as suspension and steering components. OH Yea....grease the door hinges and hood pivots.

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Partsman,

 

I'm also a firm believer in Amsoil products. I put only Amsoil in my car. I get Oil at a discount from them as a preferred customer too. I will probably use their products for the rest of my life.

 

My best friend is an automotive Master Tech. He was the one who introduced me to Amsoil and I can't believe I didn't know about them earlier.

 

I love the fact that I can get 15,000 miles (or even 25,000) out of one oil change. I change at 15,000 just to be safe but its nice to know the oil is rated up to 25k. The oil has also impressed me in other areas. My car use to leak a lot of oil, even since I switched to Amsoil it has leaked much slower. The car also seems to drive better (although that might just be my butt dyno).

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