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awake

trying to convince family members to Prep.

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So we have touched on this subject before, but i am looking for some help in this area. My situation is with brothers and sisters. No problem with immediate family. What can you do or say? Is it my moral obligation to persist? What am i to do if an event brings them to my door in need? I am torn between being my brother keeper and i told you so.

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Its a hard subject because its your family and you care about them but like the saying goes you can't force people to do anything. My family knows I prep buy I have not confronted them about them doing it because I know them and they would just blow it off. If you think they would Perceptctive to it then approach them but do so as emergency prep to a storm or power outage and not an apocalyptic event because that would probably throw them off the idea. Just go slow and ask if they have any plans if they were to have a house fire or something like that and since you plan for such scenarios you could be helpful to them.

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On a side note I just got my wife fully on board with what I'm doing and it has taken almost a year. I just told her that while I appreciate her thoughts and concerns I'm going to keep prepping because I know it to be the right thing to do for our family and she eventually saw that.

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My parents know that my wife and I prep. While my parents don't officially prep they have bought a generator and dad grows a small garden. He is an avid hunter and fisherman and could provide for himself if need be. My BIL was an easy convert. He was in my basement one day and asked what was in all the 5 gallon buckets and what was all the food on the shelf for. He was hooked after that. He has since began purchasing guns, ammo and food. I have attempted to work on my wifes parent to no avail. I had suggested to store some food, water and means of cooking and heat. They do store food (due to an hoarding issue) but nothing else. During a 10 day winter power outage they had no way to heat or cook. I thought about loaning my Coleman stove but I was experiencing the same outage.

 

I guess the bottom line is that some people are more receptive. I hear alot of people say "its silly" or "nothing is going to happen". All I can say is that during that 10 day power outage my family was fairly warm, bellies were full and TV and lights were thanks to the genny.

 

Maybe you could suggest they start with power outages and the such in mind and work up from there.

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I was shocked recentley!!!

My 16 year old nephew(wifes brothers son) noticed my para cord on my wrist.

"Uncle Matt where did you get that??" I made him and a friend one right there.

Than it was on..he has been watching the "Extreme Prepers"..I explained the difference between Extreme and being prepared!We went out to the garden and I asked how much food do you think it takes to feed your family if Wally world is closed??

He has made a commitement to help this year!!

 

I promised to take him fishing this year,my Wife said if he stays with it I can get him a BOB..

 

There is always HOPE...

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Awake , I find that doing a indirect approach works well . Find a interest they like or introduce them to a new hobby. .. Hiking .. Needs a backpack with food,water etc. like 101matt said he would take nephew fishing, now he can integrate survival smarts and tools , even make that lead to a overnight camping . I did something as simple as buying a vacuum pack to help with keeping food in freezer from getting freezer burned and gf liked it so much , she see what else we can seal to keep fresh , now she's doing aspirin in small doses so she can take them with her and not the whole big bottle. As for my kids , when the electric goes out or we are watching shows/movies they like to watch that has emergency situations happening , I ask them what would they do or what would they need to help them in that situation . I think this method helps cause its their own thought progression, and they form ideas on their own , especially when it's shows on tv that they like to watch since they seem to relate more to them

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My older brother knows that I prep. He busts on me sometimes like Im crazy, but I know he watches Doomsday Preppers. I posed it more to him as a natural disaster situation then full TEOTWAWKI. Im going to store as many supplies as I can. He is like a father to me so if he showed up at my door I would help him and his family as much as I can. Im planning on container gardening this year and hope to get into canning. I think hes better prepared then the average person but not by much.

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I also recently talked to my brother-in-law and father-in -law about prepping with mixed results. Got a better response from father-in-law. He recently purchased a generator and they store a decent amount of water for emergencies. Hes going to teach me to fish this year.

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So we have touched on this subject before, but i am looking for some help in this area. My situation is with brothers and sisters. No problem with immediate family. What can you do or say? Is it my moral obligation to persist? What am i to do if an event brings them to my door in need? I am torn between being my brother keeper and i told you so.

 

All you can really 'do' is repeat your concerns without being overbearing I guess. Force is fairly useless with this type of stuff. As far as helping when it happens, I guess that depends on your stocks, how hard it is to restock, and length of event/time before stability returns. I think the "I told you so" will be said for you when it happens too.

 

 

 

My family knows I have stuff, but only some of them have their own, so I worry at times about how much help I will be able to give if things get really bad also.

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Nice to know that some of you are in the same boat and have made a little headway. My main concern is my mother. She has a tuff spirit and a bit stubborn. She lived thru the dust bowl days is the mid west but shows no interest of even storing some extra food.Its not a money thing, she knows that i will help with anything even including storage of food and emergency supplies. Same old line of "oh the government will help me out". That thought alone scares me. It takes me 40 minutes to get to her on a normal day. Lord help me if it happens. I am strung out with her and others that i would have to rally with.

i will keep the approach light and see if i can make some head way.

 

thanks everyone i was losing hope with this aspect.

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One thing you can try for the ones that have the, "Hi, I'm from the goverment and I'm here to help you." attitude.

 

Ask em how long it took the goverment to help the people in Louisiana and New Orleans after Katrina. Ask em if they know what condishions in the Super Dome were like, or on the bridge.

 

If nothing else it may make em think.

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If things go south they'll be coming to you. If possible I would store extra food for them (but don't tell them). It might suck that they aren't helping themselves. But they are you're family and regardless you will want to help them.

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If things go south they'll be coming to you. If possible I would store extra food for them (but don't tell them). It might suck that they aren't helping themselves. But they are you're family and regardless you will want to help them.

 

X2 on that. started to increase prep. i will always stand with family even when we disagree.

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I had a surprising discussion with my mom last week about this.

 

She and my dad have a well-appointed RV, so in a power outage they have several days' worth of utilities that they can count on, plus they usually have spare propane at home since they have a gas grill in the backyard. But now that they've retired, they spend about six months out of the year just outside of Phoenix, and they completely run through their food stores before leaving either place - by the time they head home for spring or south for the winter, their pantry is likely to be a couple of cans of soup and maybe a box of baking soda, which I find alarming. They do a good job of keeping about a month's worth of medication on hand, but that will be all but meaningless when TSHTF - my dad has COPD and will basically be unable to breathe if/when medication is no longer available.

 

Anyway, I was talking about how I was starting to really work on having extra food on hand, and how handy that is when we have freak weather around here (something that's fairly common in early spring). My mom mentioned that she'd been thinking about that, so I talked her through the merits of having a deep pantry and suggested a few resources, which she was definitely receptive to. I think I could make this into a "girls' project" with her once she and my dad are back in a month or so.

 

I also tried to get her to think through the precariousness of the situation near Phoenix if something truly catastrophic happened - the fact that there are so many people, that their place is fairly un-defensible, and that there are really, really bad people ALREADY doing really bad things just across the border, which isn't all that far away in the grand scheme of things, and who would feel emboldened if there wasn't a strong military/police presence to stop them from coming north. I was hoping to get her to promise to head north if things ever got even a little hairy, but she just got uncomfortable, so I shelved the discussion. I may bring it up with my dad because he's more interested in news and current events.

 

My sister is a lost cause as far as most prepping goes, so I actually prep with her in mind and will be (once I feel I have my own basics covered) bringing in extras to hand out to family members. I know I can't wholly prep for everyone, but I can see having "kits" that could help them in the short- and long-term. I wouldn't be willing to sacrifice my immediate family for my extended family, but I also don't think I could truly just turn my back on family and friends without regretting it forever.

 

I think of this as a little like those airplane safety instructions: secure your own breathing mask and THEN help others. So I'll take care of me first, then my sister and parents, and then I'll do what I can so that I can help others if necessary. If I don't take care of myself, I won't be around to help anyone else.

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I'd say work the "bad weather prep" angle. If you start talking politics, nukes, emp, solar flares, you will probly lose a lot of people quick. Katrina was a huge wake up call for me personally, unfortunately people living in the American suburban bubble don't think that could happen to them, but there's plenty of horror stories out there about post-Katrina stuff. My lady was most def not on board when I started, gave it some time, planted a few seeds (fig.) and here we are, in the past week she bought six books, several cans of beans and 25 lbs of rice on her own. I'm sure most guys around here would agree that even tho we know everything (fact), we are somehow always wrong, I no longer have opinions or positions and I don't get hung up on arguing, I simply listen, suggest the correct solution, and watch the seed grow. "Yeah that sounds good, this might happen though, maybe we could try this, or that" two weeks later who agrees with me because I did not act like I gave a crap? It's the best when she has a great idea that she doesn't realize I suggested word for word in the past.

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Guest survival101

Leadership. Always wish I married into it. Buy a book or the rifle he wants, and he's happy. It's a hobby. Ask for step up on the grocery shopping, a trip to the boonies or the rifle range for practice, hand him a product he didn't ask for, and he it's like trying to drag a small child away from their safe, happy place. Grrrrrrrrr... Somebody save me a place in their bunker plz... I'll bring supplies. :mad:

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I hope this will help a bit. One of my best friends and his family is an adopted brother, so their family is part of our immediate family and they live within short walking distance, less than a quarter mile. His wife cannot emotionally "handle" certain

types of crisis preparations and doesn't like to even to think about terrible calamities , disasters or other issues. So, we work around it. She will start to let me know she's concerned he,s obsessing about surviving apocalyptical stuf-which he DOES do, so I let him vent to me about his concerns, and then he and I can address what he can actually control and what he cannot.

I have to watch my blood pressure because if I start discussing politicians and their lunacy, I could stroke out, and frankly not one of "those people" is worth it. He and I discuss what we can control, what' s in our sphere of influence' little things, like if you had to walk home, do you know which rpute you would take? Or if heading home after an earthquake, how many

bridges and over passes would you have to cross over or under to make it home? We hace some cold winters so, we add into that discussion cold weather and hot weather gear for getting home as well. We try to keep things on a PERSONAL-what-

about-me (and my family) levels only. I also encourage people to at least store a years supply of food and water for economic reasons like job layoffs, illness, injury, etc. This is far more "palatable" for most people than thinking aboutTEOWAWKI or any other scenario that xould be dreamed up. Personally, I am far more concerned about LOCAL issues than wide-spread or regional civil unrest, natural disasters and the like. They are far more likely to occur to US, than worrying about a rogue nation detonating an EMP blast over us someplace. It is far less "expensive" for them to crash pur power grid infrastructure from cyber-attacks like they did back in the ,90s in the Pacific Northwest power grid crash that came out of three knuckleheads in st. Petersburg, Russia. That kind of attack is far more likely to occur I believe and can occur with little or no warning.

Trying to get people excited about civil unrest-riots, bunkering up, and facing "zombies" which I think is truly stupid -just MY

Own opinion is all, (any zombie reference is forbidden in our family becuase it lacks any credibility at all) and other chaos

is a bit like trying to get someone to quit being an Ostich. If that is what they have beem doing all their lives, chances are good they will never change, so work in a positive reinforcement with them, it saves frustration on both ends. I necer tell people (for instance) I am legally carrying concealed, it gets some folks all worked up unnecessarily becuase they hace differentnviewpoints and far different professional experience than I do. Conversely, I "see" ugly things developing long before most folks do, becuase I look for the tell.tale signs and try to avoid them if at all possible. I won't go into any convemience store unless I have to, and not before I've scoped the exterior out, looking for signs it's in a bad neighborhood. i look for graffiti, certain "street uniforms" being sported by the local males, little things like that, leftover warning signs from my time in law enforcement.

I hve nothing to prove by going to fist city with anyone, and a lot of the people arw just plain "icky" now, with all sorts of infectious and communicable diseases, I want to keep my distance. I also encpurage folks to NOT go shopping for that gallon of milk at oh-dark-thirty because you are armed, it's just not smart. Little things is where I start with folks, it definitley gets

Them thinking. If they can teust you with their questions-and that can take some time, let their questions come naturally,

don't force the issue at all. Just been my experience, sorry for the long winded post.

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Guest kevin

everyone will either see the need on their own or they won't.......just because we love them doesn't mean their smart enough to see that our current situation is unsustainable ......but we can always hope they get it before the ark doors close.

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Malcolm,

I always encourage folks to NOT talk about TEOTWAWKI. A lot of folks can not emotionally face the fact that their world may end. You are correct, stressing over things we can't do anything about is a waste of time. Given a world where we are taught that how if feel is more important than what actually is, folks can't deal with the fact that Mother Nature really is out to KILL you!

My son, who lives in an open carry state was in a parking lot at oh-dark-thirty and was accosted by a couple of punks. When he turned to face him and they saw the .40 on his hip, they exited the area post haste. A short term TSHTF because he was PREPARED for that event. Had he not been prepared, he could well have been dead.

Start with the immediate, short term and go from there. When a co-worker gets robbed at an ATM in broad daylight I can make a good case for short term preps. For storms, power outages (several hours yesterday due to a blown transformer - local only but hit me) etc.

Once they've gotten in for a month or three then the rest is easier.

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I just saw a piece on the TV on "coupon shopping". Basically it was buy what is on sale with coupons up to the limit allowed. That will give you up to 3 months supply of that item. You do this to save money and to carry forward to the next sale. Interesting from my point of view was that the "being prepared for unexpected guests" reason as well as money saved was primary. I was thinking, unexpected guest - yeah, like Rita and Ike and Katrina ........

 

It's not prepping. Apparently 'couponing' is a good thing. Go figure.

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Capt Bart, you have such a lovely way of maneuvering around people's obstacles.

 

Can't handle/envision mass panic and a breakdown of society? Then let's talk about hurricane preps, and see where it goes from there...

 

Don't see why you need to defend yourself when there are police? Well, let's talk about a local crime/potential crime and whether an appropriately armed citizen would fare better in that case...

 

It's really an incredibly useful skill, and definitely an idea that the rest of us could bank on. Cheap relatives could be persuaded to prep simply because there are cost-savings if you coupon and buy in bulk, and doing your own preserving/storing saves a fortune. That it has the added benefit of giving you practical post-SHTF skills and supplies doesn't really need to be focused on. Or in my area, there's a sort of rabid green mentality, so being off-the-grid isn't anti-social, it's reducing your own carbon foot print. Having an extensive garden isn't about hoarding your own cache of food, it's about ensuring that your food is organic, not genetically altered, is locally sourced, etc. Heck, at my last job, some of the employees actually created a communal organic garden on-site that was tended during breaks, and it generated so much food that they would give at least two 50-gallon tubs of produce to the local food bank every week during the most productive parts of the season... in addition to bringing home their own fresh produce and sharing with staff members in the lunch room. It would not be at all difficult to get a group to collaborate on a similar venture on private property around here.

 

Anyway, my point is that I'm very impressed. Great idea for gently figuring out who might eventually be receptive to prepping together, as well as expanding the people you know who are well supplied and may not show up at your doorstep, desperate and empty-handed, when TSHTF.

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Guest survival101

Okay, today I found an email from my Dad, dated 2006. He sent to me to make sure I knew how to prepare for pandemic. My folks keep supplies on hand to make sure they can sustain hard times, but their rhyme and reason has never been clear to me. I don't think they have a plan, just always putting something back for "in case." They grew up in the Depression. Dad became a scientist. He was ready for Y2K, a crisis which did not occur. And he tried to make sure I was. And in 2006 he was urging me via this article, to prep. Recently I asked him about prepping, and he said, I don't know what you're talking about. He was serious. When I explained the concept, he was still baffled. He has lost a lot of cognitive function, I think. Then this week I asked my Mom what she would do if Grand Gulf (nuclear power plant) went down. She had no idea. I gave her some ideas, but I'm sure she has no interest. My spouse is nominally behind me. But if it comes to making a commitment to something other than a nifty man-toy, he's not really with the program. I feel absurdly alone. Okay. I understand where you guys are coming from. I may be alone, but I'm not stopping.

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