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AmeriGirlUK

AmeriGirl's Bug Out Bag

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Okay, here is a picture of the two bags I keep in my trunk. I put the water bottle there to give you an idea of the size. The larger bag is for my gear and the smaller bag is for clothing.

 

urbanwomansbugoutbag001yy9.jpg

 

I'm just going to post pics of the items in the larger gear bag because nobody cares to see my undies and socks and clothes! :D

 

This is an overall view of ALL the stuff I have in the gear bag.

 

urbanwomansbugoutbag004yz8.jpg

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Now, I'll show everything in a little more detail. The Kershaw Outcast goes where I go. I keep it by my bed at night, then put it in my bag during the day. I keep the SAK in my purse or on my belt if I'm hiking.

 

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This is something else I don't leave home without. I keep this PSK in the console of my car and when I go hiking, I put it in my pocket. It has EVERYTHING in it!

 

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My windup LED flashlight (I bought 3 of them) and my Brinkmann LED flashlight. I have a windup AM/FM Radio/Cell Phone Charger somewhere...

 

sbugoutbag020we2.jpg

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Here's all my "girlie" stuff and meds which I keep in that zippered bag. Women do NOT like to be sweaty and stinky!

 

sbugoutbag022ij5.jpg

 

Here are some items I keep all together in another zippered bag. Don't you just love my folding saw my aunt Gail and uncle Hank gave me for Christmas? And I love my little Ultralight First Aid Kit too.

 

urbanwomansbugoutbag036ww5.jpg

 

Here are my maps and notepads and pencil/pen. I keep these in a ziplock bag to keep them from getting wet.

 

sbugoutbag026oj1.jpg

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Here's the FUN stuff! My zippered bag with all my firestarting items! Whoo Hoo! I use the pocketknife with the serrated edge for my mag/flint stick so I won't dull my best knives. I love my Vaseline saturated cottonballs. They catch fire in seconds!

 

urbanwomansbugoutbag027yu3.jpg

 

And here's a pic of my keychain. I try not to put too much heavy stuff on it because the weight swinging back and forth while driving will totally ruin a starter switch.

I love my LED Pulsar light. It's VERY bright. I bought several of those and gave them to family and friends.

 

sbugoutbag044rf8.jpg

 

Okay, I'll admit it, there is no "real" food whatsoever here. It's all my favorite junk stuff to snack on! LOL!!! I need some help with what kinds of foods I should keep in my bag. Maybe to last three days for three people. Suggestions are greatly appreciated!

 

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And then I put it all back into my gear bag to go back into the trunk of my car...

 

urbanwomansbugoutbagiz0.jpg

 

AND WHO SAYS WOMEN CAN'T PACK?

 

I welcome any comments, observations, and suggestions

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Very nice! Just to answer your food question, you can survive on 'junk food' for three days no problem. But if you want a little better nutrition, there are generally 3 very good options.

 

1- Mountain House or other similar dehydrated backpacking food. Simply add boiling water and presto, you have an instant meal. Pros, very light, usually fairly tasty. Cons, takes extra water to rehydrate.

 

2- MRE's. If you get Military style ones that come with a self heater they can warm themselves. They are somewhat bulky, but can be opened and taken out of the cardboard boxes to reduce thier size. Pros, ready to eat food, decent even if cold, no cooking or boiling required. Cons, heavier than dehydrated food, and somewhat bulky.

 

3- Mainstay food bars. I have no personal experience with these, but think giant granola bar. They come in different calorie counts, up to around 3600 in a bar. As I said, I have no personal experience with these... maybe someone else can clarify more.

 

Hope that helped answer your question.

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Oh and I should add, while those look like excellent car bags, what would you do if your car broke down/ran out of gas/was rendered inoperable by EMP or solar flare? I see they have a shoulder strap, but have you tried carrying that for even 1 mile? Im guessing the bag would have just about cut your arm off your shoulder by then lol.

 

I would seriously suggest looking into a backpack with either an internal or external frame, but thats just my opinion.

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I use the pocketknife with the serrated edge for my mag/flint stick so I won't dull my best knives....

 

Better to use the back of the knife to 'strike' the firesteel. Just IMO

 

I second the backpack idea.

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Lol, I feel like Im critiqueing here, but I thought of a few more small ideas.

 

Take everything out of its packaging. You have mostly done that, but I noticed a few things still in it. Unless your planning on using the packaging for a fire starter. This will save weight and room.

 

Buy a hacksaw blade, or find a used dull one (either work, and old dull ones are free usually). Put it in a vise and snap it off into 4 lengths of about 3 inches, drill a hole for a lanyard and you have an excellent striker for a ferro rod or your magnesium bar that you dont have to worry about dulling a knife.

 

Pack stuff inside your wide mouth water bottles, it will give you more room in your pack. Usually pack it in a ziplock baggy so its easy to pull it all out at once.

 

Maybe get some chapstick with SPF, and sunscreen. This is dependent on your climate, but for the size and weight, I would deffinitely get the chapstick at least. Ive also heard you can use chapstick like a cotton ball soaked in vaseline, but havent tried it myself.

 

Also some paper coffee filters and a bandana would be good. Place them over the mouth of your canteen to filter out any grit in the water before you purify. Also a hiking water purifier would be a good primary water purifier, with the tablets as a backup, and boiling as a last resort. Or there are the battery operated steripens that kill nastys with UV light.

Edited by Schoeny

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Excellent suggestions! I really do appreciate the input.

 

I do have a great backpack that I use for day hikes. It weighs about 22 lbs when loaded. I should keep it in the trunk of my car in case I couldn't stay with my vehicle, then I could pack some of the stuff from my bug out bag into the backpack.

 

I think the freeze-dried foods would be the best choice for packing purposes. They are super-light!

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Lol, I feel like Im critiqueing here, but I thought of a few more small ideas.

 

Take everything out of its packaging. You have mostly done that, but I noticed a few things still in it. Unless your planning on using the packaging for a fire starter. This will save weight and room.

 

Buy a hacksaw blade, or find a used dull one (either work, and old dull ones are free usually). Put it in a vise and snap it off into 4 lengths of about 3 inches, drill a hole for a lanyard and you have an excellent striker for a ferro rod or your magnesium bar that you dont have to worry about dulling a knife.

 

Pack stuff inside your wide mouth water bottles, it will give you more room in your pack. Usually pack it in a ziplock baggy so its easy to pull it all out at once.

 

Maybe get some chapstick with SPF, and sunscreen. This is dependent on your climate, but for the size and weight, I would deffinitely get the chapstick at least. Ive also heard you can use chapstick like a cotton ball soaked in vaseline, but havent tried it myself.

 

Also some paper coffee filters and a bandana would be good. Place them over the mouth of your canteen to filter out any grit in the water before you purify. Also a hiking water purifier would be a good primary water purifier, with the tablets as a backup, and boiling as a last resort. Or there are the battery operated steripens that kill nastys with UV light.

 

These are awesome suggestions! Thank you for taking the time to do this!

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I do have a great backpack that I use for day hikes. It weighs about 22 lbs when loaded.

 

You may want to look into a larger pack, like an ALICE frame pack or a Kelty. I'm not sure if you are in an Urban area or not, but if you are, considering population density, you probably won't get far in a car. So having a frame pack(internal or external) will make your walk a lot easier.

 

-Maybe put together a little fishing kit, and read up on small game trapping. Food stocks only last so long.

 

-You can cut your starter log into pieces for multiple uses/ease of storage.

 

-Pick up something to use for cordage like paracord, or bank line.(both IMO)

this site has both for reasonable cost;

http://stores.thepathfinderschoolllc.com/-strse-Cordage/Categories.bok

 

 

I would also consider getting a bigger shovel(solid handle design) when you can.**opinion**

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If you do go with a larger shovel, I'd recommend something like this one:

 

Entrenching-Tool-Cover-Both-Dated-1945-/330711862243?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4cfff68be3

 

Edges can be sharpend and used as an emergency ax or weapon.

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I did not see a rod then I looked at your location OMG you have a hatchet your going to prison for life.

can you even have girley products does that not alienate the GLBT's as that would make you

aware of who you are and I am not sure if they do?

 

but great job I am almost jealous just having some fun with ya'

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LOL! I made NO apologies for being a "girlie-girl". I'm happy just as I am. I don't worry too much about all the haters in the world. They are just miserable people who don't deserve one second of my time. :P

 

I'm glad you like the bug out bag. It's so much fun putting one together! I can spend hours and hours at REI or The Bass Pro Shop finding new "stuff" to stuff in there.

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You don't have a pillow in the BOB. ;) Just teasing. I finally broke down last week and bought an inflatable pillow at REI for a backpacking trip this past weekend.

 

And for a pack, get yourself a Gregory. They ride like a dream. My 3 day pack is an Osprey Atmos 50, but I hardly use it anymore because my Gregory Palisade is so much more confortable, even though it's bigger and heavier.

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All good suggestions so far.

 

I'd get rid of the cheap hatchet, or just put it in your trunk and leave it out of the bag. I had one of those Outcast knives, and it is every bit as good a chopper as that hatchet. I'd also ditch the cheap fixed blade you have in the other pic, I have a couple of those and I wouldn't want to rely on them. I'd look at getting a better quality axe with at least a 19" handle or just going with the Outcast and a good saw. Past that the Swiss army knife and leatherman should handle cutting. I use the back of the saw blade on my Trekker swiss army knife or leatherman wave to strike my firesteel also and it works very well. I also have one of those little shovels and it's another place I'd either upgrade or ditch it entirely.

 

I also have one of the cooking pots you show and while it is in my camping kit, it's plenty big for a survival kit you may have to carry. I'd get an esbit stove, plenty of fuel tabs, and a small nesting cookset from Coleman or Snow peak depending on budget.

 

Raingear? An army poncho and liner would be a good addition.

 

Cordage is a good idea also, a roll of braided nylon bankline, 100ft of paracord, and a few zip ties can come in real handy.

 

I'd also look at getting a good quality backpack. I'd go to a camping store and find one that really fits you well and works with your budget. Then I'd get a good raincover for it and keep items you'd want if you had to leave your vehicle in the backpack. Items that you'd leave in your vehicle if you had to abandon it could stay in one of the other bags.

 

You are on the right track, keep up the good work.

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Forgot to add, a few mountain house meals would be a good idea for better food. My favorite is the chicken breast and mashed potato meal. Also a Katadyn or other water filter, plus the coffee filters mentioned earlier for pre-filtering. When using your tarps I'd recommend having bungee straps with them to prevent the grommets from tearing out. Aluminum tent stakes can help to quickly build a shelter rather than having to find or build them and they weigh very little. I pack a spare space blanket to use as a fire reflector also. An emergency bivy like the ones from Adventure Medical will be warmer and more durable than the regular blankets. During winter months a real sleeping bag is an even better idea. A tarp lean-to with a space blanket fire reflector with a leaf or bough mattress and something warm to sleep under can make a pretty decent camp.

 

I'd also add a decent headlamp with an LED bulb and various brightness settings with lithium batteries for hands-free lighting while walking or doing other nighttime activities.

 

What about care for your tools? A little oil and a diamond stone will keep your tools in good working order. That D2 steel is hard and will need a good stone to sharpen.

 

I'll shut up now, that should give you some things to look at the next trip to REI or BP shop.

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