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Need Help Selecting Blades

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Hello,

 

I need some help selecting the optimal blades to compliment the fixed-blade knife I currently have. I intend to use these blades in a wilderness survival setting (various North American biomes) and I am new to wilderness survival in general.

 

I currently have the Ontario Blackbird SK-5, which is a straight-edged spear-point knife. I am looking to get a smaller folding knife that has a serrated blade (or partially serrated blade) and maybe some other features that the SK-5 lacks. I also want to get a machete or hatchet, but not both, and I really don't know too much about wilderness survival to know which would be the better overall choice or if there is an in-between solution.

 

What would you suggest?

 

Thanks in advance.

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For pocket knives I like CRKT and Benchmade, there are about a bazillion and a half folding knives on the market, so I'd suggest going with a reputable maker and just picking one that fits your hand and pocket comfortably. As for a heavy working blade be it an axe or machete.... I'd recommend a pack axe over a hatchet if you go that direction, it's only slightly larger and heavier but can do about 10x the work. As for machetes, get one that was actually designed to be used in a hardwood setting, paper thin latin style machetes don't work too well for serious work in North America. I'm a fan of Condor Tools machetes, http://www.condortk.com/products.php?type=9 The village Parang and Golok are both blades by this maker I've used, I own the Golok, you'd be hard pressed to find an edged tool that can do as much as either of these in such a small package. I recommend carbon steel over stainless, heavy working blades take a lot of abuse and impact when set to task and outside of a few hot-rod stainless grades they aren't really mixed to take that sort of sustained punishment.

 

The big thing with either the axe or machete is developing the skill sets to use them effectively and safely. Give me an axe and I'll split some firewood, that's all the functional skill I really have with one, doing anything else with it and I'm likely to hurt myself. Give me a machete and I'll butcher game, build a shelter, make a bow, fillet a fish, and so on and so on... Having the tool and knowing how to use it are two different things.

 

Hope I helped.

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I am with Vicioustom

 

a hatchet is OK I have the chinese one hammer hatchet nail puller pry bar cheap but takes little room.

the machete with a saw back is a fantastic all around tool just make sure it has a

full tang handle the gerber does not so check and make sure as if the handle breaks

and its a spike tang it is going to take a day to fashion a handle and still not work right.

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Guest kevin

hey snake, check out the "hasp" mykle hawke is going to produce.....i can't decide if its awesome or not.....sometimes simple is better....but mulitasking is a good thing too....dunno

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In terms of a folder I have not found a better one than The Gerber Paraframe, for the price. LOVE IT. My fixed blade of choice is the Gerber LMF infantry, luckily I have one that was made when they were still making them in Oregon.

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Unless you have a strong reason to carry a serrated folder, I'd suggest you stick to a plain edge folder with a heavy duty blade. Easier to (re)sharpen, and there isn't anything a serrated edge cuts better than a properly sharpened plain edge. I've owned both, and carried both, and I've come to realize that the 'partial serrated edge' is a waste of my money. When I want a saw, I'll use a folding saw or a machete with a long sawtooth back. When I want to cut something, I'll use a razor sharp plain edged knife. The serrated area of a typical folder is simply too short to get efficient sawing strokes - I'd be better off with one long swipe from smooth sharp edge than a bunch of knuckle busting strokes with the serrations.

Edited by survivalcyclist

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Unless you have a strong reason to carry a serrated folder, I'd suggest you stick to a plain edge folder with a heavy duty blade. Easier to (re)sharpen, and there isn't anything a serrated edge cuts better than a properly sharpened plain edge. I've owned both, and carried both, and I've come to realize that the 'partial serrated edge' is a waste of my money. When I want a saw, I'll use a folding saw or a machete with a long sawtooth back. When I want to cut something, I'll use a razor sharp plain edged knife. The serrated area of a typical folder is simply too short to get efficient sawing strokes - I'd be better off with one long swipe from smooth sharp edge than a bunch of knuckle busting strokes with the serrations.

 

I basically agree. The only place I've seen an advantage to a serrated blade in a folder is as a rescue knife for cutting webbing (seat belts). With that exception, no argument at all. I carry both types but I've never "needed" the serrated edge.

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hey snake, check out the "hasp" mykle hawke is going to produce.....i can't decide if its awesome or not.....sometimes simple is better....but mulitasking is a good thing too....dunno

 

I will check it out

 

OK been there looked and I like my cold steel bushman better I have a saw blade on my machete and

in my Swiss army explorer so duplication is not needed.and I have had problems with blades hanging with

anything other than a straight edge.

 

and the tanto point has been done to death I am an old hard head the bushman bowie is my kind of knife

I have retired my EK good knife but is considered a dagger or dirk as it has double edge.

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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I basically agree. The only place I've seen an advantage to a serrated blade in a folder is as a rescue knife for cutting webbing (seat belts). With that exception, no argument at all. I carry both types but I've never "needed" the serrated edge.

 

You know Capt. I've seen you mention this before, and I'm a bit torn on that one, I've had to cut people out of vehicles before. With my field knife in all it's razor-like goodness all that was needed was hooking under the webbing and pulling, sliced through it like butter. Now with my folders that get a lot of use and only get sharpened about every two or three weeks (Meaning the edge may be questionable at any given point in time) I've had to do a bit of sawing.

 

All of that said there is a better tool for the job. I had to extract myself from a flipped vehicle while hanging at a precarious angle in the dark and the army was kind enough to have given me one of these a few weeks before http://www.officerstore.com/store/product.cfm/pid_5483_benchmade_7_hook_strap_cutter_with_molle_sheath/ I was one of the few people that carried it, and was glad I did, if I'd tried to cut myself loose with a knife I may very well have impaled myself when I landed (Still busted a finger, others were less fortunate when the road gave way and all the vehicles went tumbling). In fact this handy little tool has replaced a lot of my other cutting tools, I use it to edge leather, have used it to cut a boot off of a casualty, etc... The short of it is these things are just darned handy if you think you'll need to respond to an emergency.

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I'm gonna hijack a bit, sorry, I have 50 bucks to bass pro shops online store, 5$ shipping, I usually carry a folding box cutter for a knife because I always seem to have boxes to cut in the work place and it cuts shtuff nicely. I tend to abuse the hell out of it and am growing tired of it and want a new knife that fits the criteria of $45 from bass pro shops online and is awesome.

*A word on the sawback machete*

Yeah Buddy. I got the Gerber one and I agree with Snake it could be better but for 20 bucks I effin love it. The saw is not bad and I figure good machete throwin is an alright skill to have so there has been significant target practice, mixed results. Like six trees (11in dia.), several square feet of thick bushes, countless overgrown branches, two beer bottles, bounced it off a huge rock a couple times and the thing is still like new, after a some tlc of course. I like testing things.

 

Help me spend 45 bucks at bass pro shops

Edited by IHopeThatitsZombies
I'm mentally disabled.

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I'm gonna hijack a bit, sorry, I have 50 bucks to bass pro shops online store, 5$ shipping, I usually carry a folding box cutter for a knife because I always seem to have boxes to cut in the work place and it cuts shtuff nicely. I tend to abuse the hell out of it and am growing tired of it and want a new knife that fits the criteria of $45 from bass pro shops online and is awesome.

 

You don't say where you keep your box cutter (pocket, belt case, or clipped to your pants) and you didn't mention whether or not you have your own sharpening system either.

 

So, assuming you don't have a good sharpening system, and that you will be carrying your knife in a pocket or a belt sheath, I'd recommend you buy this knife, and the Lansky Sharpening System:

 

http://www.basspro.com/Browning-Micarta-Handle-Folding-Knife-with-Pocket-Clip/product/10207398/147839

http://www.basspro.com/Lansky-Sharpening-System-Standard-Kit/product/41168/71370

 

With those two things, you will always have a sharp pocket knife when you need it. The Lansky is outstanding for sharpening blades under 6 inches, and the Browning knife is sturdy,dependable and easy to open with one hand.

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I basically agree. The only place I've seen an advantage to a serrated blade in a folder is as a rescue knife for cutting webbing (seat belts). With that exception, no argument at all. I carry both types but I've never "needed" the serrated edge.

 

The only time I carried a serrated blade was underwater, and that was for cutting line and kit webbing. Most of the time I just carried EMT shears because they'll cut through monofilament and even light steel cabling (both of which decorate wrecks and reefs).

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You know Capt. I've seen you mention this before, and I'm a bit torn on that one, I've had to cut people out of vehicles before. With my field knife in all it's razor-like goodness all that was needed was hooking under the webbing and pulling, sliced through it like butter. Now with my folders that get a lot of use and only get sharpened about every two or three weeks (Meaning the edge may be questionable at any given point in time) I've had to do a bit of sawing.

 

Tom,

Point taken. My fixed blades will do the job nicely. It is just I can rarely carry a fixed blade so I'm stuck with a folder with the issue you mentioned. In each of my cars I have one of those "break glass, cut belt, wind up flashlight" thingies. Not the best in the world but they do cut webbing and having a punch for the windshield is nice. All my survival knives have a punch/bolt head for breaking out glass but with a folder I need a hammer.

 

I agree IF I have my stuff (I'm in my truck or have a fixed blade on me), otherwise I need the folder to handle the issue. Started carrying one when I was doing ground guide work for airshows and just got into the habit of having 'crash rescue' as a job for my folder.

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