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femvet59

Home heating question

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I don't think we have really discussed home heating questions dring a power failure.

In my neck of the woods coal is not allowed, wood only in certain areas (not mine), so I'm thinking about a Big Buddy heater.

Ideas/input please

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hmmm double check fem the way i understood it was if wood is primary heat source then ok, which if ya aint got power, then it seems wood becomes a primary heat source, either way if gotta stay warm do what ya gotta do and screw the PC crowd, btw im in CA and these clean air fanatics are somethin else!

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hmmm double check fem the way i understood it was if wood is primary heat source then ok, which if ya aint got power, then it seems wood becomes a primary heat source, either way if gotta stay warm do what ya gotta do and screw the PC crowd, btw im in CA and these clean air fanatics are somethin else!

 

I'm up in the Redding area where we tend to get massive wildfires, so they mean business with the wood rule. I've already checked local code, wanted to get a woodburning stove properly installed - nobody would touch it.

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wow thats really sad i'm down fresno way (just got my BOL closed friday yay!) what about relocating or buying a property with exsisting stove or fire place? I hear ya on the fire issue.. my insurance is like an extra 250 a year cuz of it and don't forget your clearances around your property!

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I don't think we have really discussed home heating questions dring a power failure.

In my neck of the woods coal is not allowed, wood only in certain areas (not mine), so I'm thinking about a Big Buddy heater.

Ideas/input please

There are catalytic heaters that run off propane. Always a possibility - have a camping heater like that. Ventilation is essential as they tend to put off some CO along with the heat.

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I don't think we have really discussed home heating questions dring a power failure.

In my neck of the woods coal is not allowed, wood only in certain areas (not mine), so I'm thinking about a Big Buddy heater.

Ideas/input please

 

 

 

Don't know what type of furnace you have,but,

This works for me ,I bought two deep cycle marine batteries,hooked them up to a 1200 watt inverter. I then cut into the power line from my furnace to the electric service and installed a male/ female plug. So now when the power goes off I run a heavy duty extension cord from the inverter to the plug and I have heat for about 24-36 hours , maybe more.

I keep it charged during the winter with a deep cycle maintenance charger and during the summer I hook it up to my solar panels that I got at Harbor Freight for $165.

This works great for my gas furnace which of course has electric solenoids and blowers.

Edited by biblenguns

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I use a gas fireplace, with no frills. Will light and burn as heat with no electricity. Of course this is only good as long as the gas supply is available. For really long term, I am still trying to find something feasible.

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You may want to consider a portable indoor safe propane heater. Amazon.com sells one called the "Mr. Heater F232000 MH9BX Buddy 4,000-9,000-BTU Indoor-Safe Portable Radiant Heater" for ~$90.00. With a propane hose extender and regulater you can connect it to a 20 lb gas bottle. The heater can easily heat two rooms if you seal the rooms.

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femvet59

 

you could do a passive solar hot water heating system and use a 12 volt pump kind of like a

closed swamp cooler system.

calculations on storage capacity to heat the area would have to be done for the square footage.

 

or if you have a central heating system and an attic you could run a radiator in a plenum box

into a cut in the piping

going in through the soffit.with the coiled polybutylene pipe so the radiator would be closed so no

chance for leakage.

 

heating duct from under the floor would require less intrusion but heated water would need to be

stored in the attic or underground in an insulated tank.

 

all this is a modified solar hot water heater

Edited by juzcallmesnake

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Guest survival101

Artic stove? burn wood, paper/yard debris pellets. Inset this in your existing fireplace.

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I'm up in the Redding area where we tend to get massive wildfires, so they mean business with the wood rule. I've already checked local code, wanted to get a woodburning stove properly installed - nobody would touch it.

 

Really?!! In a SHTF situation you would be a good sheeple and do what the PC crowd wants? The best remedy for that is more ammunition. The PC crowd doesn't like guns. The Police will be at home taking care of their families, if they have a brain, instead of the PC crowd. Once again we are talking survival.....what does that mean? Done properly burning wood does not mean that you will burn down the whole country. Sure that there will be some who do not know what they are doing and they will start a fire, so keep fire fighting equipment handy around any open flames.

 

There are multifuel military stoves available which use a multitude of different fuels in one stove. From wood to gasoline and oil. Also there are volcano stoves which use all types of fuel also.

Edited by VIS 9

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Everyone needs to remember that a gas fireplace burns COOLER up the flue than a wood fireplace by several hundred degrees if I remember correctly.

 

IT IS NOT SAFE TO BURN WOOD IN A GAS FIREPLACE!

 

Before trying it, get a professional to clean the flue and determine if it is safe to use. After a major storm (hurricane, tornado type events) even a wood burning fireplace needs to be checked. If the high wind speeds cracked the chimney starting a fire in the fireplace may also be starting a fire in the attic.

 

Be safe, not sorry!

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If you just want something quick a propane radiant heater avoid all the crap of building codes etc

Mr. buddy makes great heaters they run on 1# bottles or tanks even off a propane connection from the

wall.

 

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/NTESearch?storeId=6970&N=0&Ntk=All&Ntt=buddy+heater&Nty=1&D=buddy+heater&Ntx=mode+matchallpartial&Dx=mode+matchallpartial&cmnosearch=PPC&cm_ven=google_PPC&cm_cat=HeatersStoves&cm_pla=generic&cm_ite=buddy%20heater&mkwid=sgSXs30AR&pcrid=8759550311&mt=b

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Everyone needs to remember that a gas fireplace burns COOLER up the flue than a wood fireplace by several hundred degrees if I remember correctly.

 

IT IS NOT SAFE TO BURN WOOD IN A GAS FIREPLACE!

 

Before trying it, get a professional to clean the flue and determine if it is safe to use. After a major storm (hurricane, tornado type events) even a wood burning fireplace needs to be checked. If the high wind speeds cracked the chimney starting a fire in the fireplace may also be starting a fire in the attic.

 

Be safe, not sorry!

 

Capt. Bart,

You are correct that it is not safe to burn wood in a gas fireplace. In my post I was talking about a military 1949 type Alaska tent stove. It has a removable burner (round ring type for liquid fuel). Once the ring is removed, it can be used to burn wood and coal. With the ring inserted it will burn any type of liquid fuel. The stove is made in a box shape and all of the parts store in it when not in use. The stove pipe, which is in sections, should be cleaned after use as not to allow creosote to build up in the pipe.

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Be careful with portable heaters stoves. A lot of them aren't meant to be used indoors because the fuel source releases carbon monoxide when burned. If you absolutely must use it indoors open a window.

 

Good point, you beat me to it. Remember that CO is heavier than air and will pool. DO NOT SLEEP ON THE FLOOR close to a heater that puts out CO. All kinds of bad things can happen, even in tents. You do need some cross ventilation. Your life, quite literally, depends on it.

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I guess I forgot to add

 

at night we do not use heaters as it is a waste of fuel and if your in a tent in the house

trying to heat a small area same problem as soon as you feel hot or flush get up and get moving.

survival life is not laying around and watching tv.

getting warm is to continue working and not get frost bite

 

only a fireplace is an all night heater with proper ventilation / flue setting or you will have smoke

problems and any thing near a fireplace can start fire when a ember pops out so a screen is needed.

 

recently a family attempting to stay warm died in a truck camper shell with a Bar-B-Q pit and charcoal

fire for warmth so it is not only propane it is any fuel if your awake and notice the fire has fuel

IE wood or whatever and it starts to dim consider a lack of oxygen and check.

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